Posts Tagged ‘nbc’

NBC and American Express Team Up Again to Replace More Today Show Ad Time

October 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After replacing 30 minutes of prime-time spots with branded content on Leap Day, NBC and American Express are teaming up again next week. But this time, the partnership will feature longer Today segments instead of linear branded content. The weeklong partnership, which will once again highlight American Express' Blue Cash Everyday Card, begins on Monday, and will add 27 total additional minutes of programming to Today for the week. Monday's and Friday's shows will feature additional three-minute segments in place of the usual ad pods: in the "trending" portion of Today's 8 a.m. hour and the opening chats in the 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. hours. On Tuesday and Thursday, the 10 a.m. chats will also be extended by three minutes, while the 9 a.m. chat will be three minutes longer on Wednesday. Unlike the Leap Day campaign, this partnership won't include any linear branded content to replace the eliminated ad pods. "The content is all Today show content as we choose," said Mark Miller, evp, news advertising sales, NBCUniversal, with American Express having no say. However, those segments will include a verbal acknowledgment of American Express' role in eliminating what would normally be an ad break. An American Express bug will occasionally be featured on screen, most frequently during the 10 a.m. segment, hosted by Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford. All video the week of Oct

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A CEO by the Age of 40

October 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Search the term "wunderkind" and several entries about Jeff Zucker will no doubt turn up. The ink had barely dried on Zucker's Harvard bachelor's degree when he joined NBC as an Olympics researcher ahead of the 1988 Seoul Summer Games. In 1989, he parlayed that into a gig on the Today show, and was named its youngest-ever executive producer in 1992. He was 26. "Looking back on it, I can't believe they gave me the job," Zucker said. "I lived and breathed every aspect of the show 24/7, and I loved every minute of it. I was young, and I made some mistakes, and doing so in the bright spotlight of media attention wasn't always easy. But I did my best to learn from them, and not make the same mistake twice." In his early 30s, two bouts of colon cancer proved to be only a minor a setback

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Facetime: End of Summer Roundup

September 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The media world was out in full force, enjoying the last days of summer on both coasts. In Los Angeles, the Emmy Awards took everyone's attention, while in New York magazines were in high gear. More below

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NBC Takes Over New World Trade Center Station With GIFs Promoting Superstore

September 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC teamed with Giphy for a Superstore GIF installation that operates through Oct. 16. NBC New York commuters who travel through the new World Trade Center transportation hub were met with quite the spectacle today, the debut of a football field-size GIF installation for NBC's sophomore sitcom Superstore. NBC and Giphy partnered on the campaign, which features GIFs of the show's cast, and which the network hopes will appeal to millennials. The network is advertising on all 19 LED displays of a marble-lined corridor in the World Trade Center transportation hub, which opened earlier this year. It's the first entertainment company to appear in the space. The nine most prominent of the 9-by-8-foot panels are devoted to the Superstore installation, with the other 10 featuring more traditional key art for NBC's other shows. "It's about the length of a football field; it's absolutely insane," said Kjerstin Beatty, svp of media at NBC Entertainment. "Customization is everything. That's the way we're able to connect with audiences in a very fragmented world." The network was looking for a different campaign to mark the return of its first successful sitcom in several years. While most series end up advertising in Times Square, "what World Trade Center represented to us was this beautiful, new canvas for us to create something custom and speak to the tech and advertising communities and the very young workforce that's down there," said Beatty.

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All 5 Broadcast Network Presidents Share Their Fall TV Playbooks

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After a season where none of the five broadcast networks grew their 18-49 audience (and ABC, Fox and NBC lost viewers in that demo), they will try to reverse that trend in the 2016-17 season, which officially kicks off Sept. 19. Over the next six weeks, the nets will roll out 20 new shows, plus 61 returning series. Adweek sat down with each of the network chiefs to talk about their strategy for the new season. Adweek: What's your most improved time slot this fall? Glenn Geller, president, CBS Entertainment: We have a real opportunity this year to grow a number of time periods: Fridays at 8 [with MacGyver], Tuesdays at 9 and 10 [with Bull and the relocated NCIS: New Orleans] and Mondays at 8 [with Kevin Can Wait and Man With a Plan]. Robert Greenblatt, chairman, NBC Entertainment: Thursdays at 9. Thursday is a night that we're reconfiguring, and Chicago Med is a really strong show that I hope will bring an audience with it to that time period. It wasn't doing badly with [The] Blacklist, but with Blacklist at 10 and Chicago Med in front of it, that time period could be improved. Gary Newman, co-chairman and co-CEO, Fox Television Group: I would expect it to be Wednesdays at 8, with Lethal Weapon. Channing Dungey, president, ABC Entertainment: Wednesdays at 10, with Designated Survivor. Mark Pedowitz, president, The CW: Mondays at 8 [with Supergirl, which The CW picked up from CBS].

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Chuck Todd on Why Donald Trump Probably Won’t Skip the Presidential Debates

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The longest-running show on American television is having a moment, once again. NBC's Meet the Press is beginning its new season with a formula that hasn't changed much since it debuted on Nov. 6, 1947: A moderator interviews a newsmaker, usually a politician or candidate, followed by a discussion of the top political and policy issues of the day. These days the moderator is Chuck Todd, a political wonk who got his start in politics briefly working for the 1992 presidential campaign of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). "Basically, I was the runner to go to the bank to deposit checks," he explained. After 15 years at National Journal's The Hotline, including six as editor in chief, the late Tim Russert recruited Todd to NBC as political director. In 2014, Todd took over Meet the Press from David Gregory after it fell to third place in the ratings. Since then, Todd and his team have brought the show back to No. 1 in the ad-friendly news demo, beating out ABC's This Week, CBS' Face the Nation and Fox News Sunday. Todd, meanwhile, still has some unfinished business, which includes completing his degree from George Washington University. Adweek: We're in the home stretch now. The presidential candidates have their late-game strategies. What's the plan for Meet the Press in these final eight weeks? Chuck Todd: The challenge is the speed with which the waves are going to come at us and the struggle to filter out what matters and what doesn't.

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‘Rogue One’ New Trailer Premieres During Olympics (Watch)

August 12, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Disney dropped a new trailer for the Star Wars spinoff film “Rogue One” during Thursday night’s Olympics coverage on NBC. Watch the trailer above. Starring Felicity Jones, “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” opens in theaters December 16, 2016.

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Why You Likely Won’t See Too Much Political Advertising During the Olympics

July 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the torch about to be lit at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, all eyes are on NBC. And with the TV-friendly time zone—Rio is only an hour ahead of the East Coast—NBC is looking to set records for viewership and advertising dollars. But even as NBC is looking at a bigger haul for ad revenue than it had in 2012—in March, the network surpassed $1 billion in national broadcast, cable and digital sales, four months earlier than it did four years ago—don't expect an onslaught of campaign ads from Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. Unless, that is, you happen to live in one of the 10 to 14 swing states that will likely determine which party wins the White House this year. It would seem that the massive audience the Olympics provides—NBC drew more than 217 million viewers over the 17 days of the 2012 London Games, including an average of 31 million per night in prime time—would be an ideal chance for candidates to get their messages out. But with only so many political dollars to go around—Borrell Associates projected north of $11 billion in political advertising for the 2016 cycle—campaigns value efficiency over audience size, especially with all the ways available to reach voters, many of which didn't exist just four years ago. "[Voter groups] can be found and targeted in way more efficient ways," said Lenny Stern, co-founder and CEO of SS+K, the agency behind youth vote campaigns for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. Thanks largely to technology, marketers today have better ways to directly target specific audience segments rather than casting a wide, pricey net. The average cost for a 30-second spot for Rio is $100,000, Kantar Media estimates, which would be a slight increase over the previous two Summer Olympics. But for prime time, that price could be as high as $1 million, according to The Wall Street Journal. "Finding voters in Virginia, Ohio, Florida or Wisconsin in the most efficient way is much more important than some scaled, amazing platform that grabs a lot of eyeballs," Stern argued. The 2016 presidential election is anything but typical; you would have to be living under a rock, that was living under another rock, to not be familiar with the two candidates. After all, one is a former first lady, and the other is a reality TV star. "You're not introducing [voters] to new people," Stern said. "Here, you're really trying to target … people who are your supporters, or who are persuadable." Campaign money swings into battleground states Election ad dollars may not flow heavily on a national level—political advertising accounted for just 1 percent of all commercial inventory during the London Games—because for many campaigns, that spending occurs at the local station level. "You also bring into play on the Senate, House and local races," said Jon Swallen, CRO at Kantar Media. "There is a bigger pool of political advertising." Kantar found that in 2012, the spending was much higher in key battleground markets than in non-battleground states. Political ads only accounted for 1.5 percent of all local station inventory during the games. For example, political ads took up 38 percent of Reno, Nev., NBC affiliate KRNV's inventory.

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Despite Streaming Options, Millennial Women Plan to Watch the Olympics on TV

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The 2016 Summer Olympics are just a few weeks away, and it looks like the TV-friendly time zone of the host city, Rio de Janeiro, will pay big dividends for NBC. With Rio just one hour ahead of the East Coast, NBC Sports executives have consistently said these games will feature the most live coverage for any Olympics that NBC has been a part of. Despite the digitally-charged media ecosystem that NBC finds itself entrenched in—for the third Olympics in row, NBC will offer every event outside of the opening ceremonies live for digital consumption— it appears that at least one audience demographic is ready to watch the games the old fashioned way, and it's not one most would've expected. Influenster , whose 2 million members are comprised mostly of millennial women, surveyed 3,992 women around the age of 25 to find out their viewing habits for the upcoming games. The product discovery and reviews platform found that the overwhelming majority of millennial women that plan to watch the Olympics will do so in front of the television (75 percent) instead of livestreaming the competition (18 percent). Overall, more than half (54 percent) of millennial women surveyed are planning to watch any coverage from Rio. Airing on a tape delay hasn't hampered NBC's ability to pull in gigantic ratings—NBC averaged north of 30 million viewers for its primetime coverage from London in 2012. In fact, Jim Bell, NBC's executive producer for its Olympics coverage, has argued that the decision to make every sport live on a digital platform has actually increased TV viewership. "By providing more content you got more viewers and more interest, it was the rising tide that lifted all boats," he said during a Paley Center for Media event last month. But for NBC, being able to have big-ticket Olympic sports like swimming, diving, track and field, beach volleyball and gymnastics airing in the moment instead of on a delay should only further boost viewership. It should come as no surprise then that many of the American athletes that millennial women are most aware of, or at least the ones they follow on social media, participate in those major events. Of the 57 percent of those who took part in the survey, Michael Phelps (15 percent) and Gabby Douglas (14 percent) were the top two U.S. athletes followed

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NBC Sets Fall Premiere Dates and Will Use ‘The Voice’ to Launch Its 3 New Series

June 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Because NBC's No. 1 series, Sunday Night Football, stretches well past 11 p.m., the network can't use it to help any of its new shows this fall. Instead, the network is making the most of its No. 2 show, The Voice, which it will deploy to launch all three of its new fall series, NBC announced today. The Voice, with new coaches Alicia Keys and Miley Cyrus, kicks off Season 11 on Monday, Sept. 19. Then NBC will air two episodes of its new Kristen Bell-Ted Danson comedy, The Good Place, which moves to its regular 8:30 p.m. Thursday spot on Sept. 22. (Trailers and descriptions of NBC's three new shows can be found here.) New drama This Is Us will debut Tuesday, Sept. 20, after The Voice's Tuesday airing and will remain at 10 p.m. for three weeks until moving to its regular 9 p.m. slot on Oct. 11

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