Posts Tagged ‘media’

NBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This Fall

February 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After two years of selling its digital video and display inventory programmatically, NBCUniversal is finally allowing programmatic buys on its linear networks as well. Today, the company announced NBCUx for Linear TV, which will launch as part of this year's upfront. "It's the industry's first national programmatic TV offering at scale," Krishan Bhatia, evp of business operations and strategy, said during a conference call with reporters. It's an extension of NBCUx, which the company launched last year as a digital programmatic offering, after making its digital video and display inventory available for programmatic buying two years ago. "We've seen great success with it, and now we're extending those capabilities to linear television," said Bhatia. He said that starting in the fall, "advertisers will be able to use data and automation to build media plans for our premium linear TV inventory across NBCUniversal's entire portfolio of cable and broadcast networks." The fall start date means the technology won't be available for advertisers to use during the Summer Olympics in August. NBCU's data offerings, which also include ATP, its audience targeting platform, and its addressable NBCU+ Powered by Comcast platform, represent "a sea change in thinking about how we create value for our customers," said Dan Lovinger, evp, entertainment ad sales group. "Our advertiser partners have been asking for help with automating their media planning and buying in a data-informed way, and we expect that by adding premium TV inventory to our offering, we'll provide the help that they're seeking." As part of the new offering, "select advertisers now will be enabled to include traditional TV inventory in their automated media plans via a private exchange using a combination of their own data, third-party data sources and NBCUniversal's premium television inventory," said Lovinger. NBCU will make its inventory and pricing information available to "a select set of demand-side platforms," and the company's client and agency partners can combine that information with their own data sources to build a media plan against their own data sets and target audiences. "Then, those agencies and clients will issue a media plan that will be subject to inventory availability and pricing at the time and approval on our part," said Bhatia. While it automates only part of the linear television workflow process, he called it "a big step in terms of making that process simpler." Lovinger said the company wasn't worried that clients using the technology could ultimately save more money than NBCUniversal would like. "We feel that we've got a complete hold on what we're doing here," he said.

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Les Moonves Is Named Chairman of CBS, Replacing Sumner Redstone

February 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Les Moonves, CBS Corp.'s CEO and president, has been named chairman of the company. He replaces the ailing Sumner Redstone, who resigned Tuesday as executive chairman, but will remain as chairman emeritus. Moonves, who joined CBS in 1995 as CBS Entertainment president, was unanimously elected by the CBS board after being nominated by Shari Redstone, Sumner Redstone's daughter and vice chair of the board. Moonves will continue on as CEO and president. Redstone, who is 92, also served as executive chairman of Viacom (when CBS and Viacom split in 2005, he was chairman of both companies), but there is no word yet about his future at that company. UPDATE: "The Viacom board of directors is scheduled to meet tomorrow," Viacom said in a statement late Wednesday afternoon

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Brands Can Now Find Out in Real Time How Many People Watch Their TV Ads. Here’s How

January 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Advertisers won't have to wait hours or days after this year's Super Bowl to find out how many people watched their spots during the Big Game. TV ad tracking company iSpot.tv has rolled out a new set of metrics that will offer brands real-time data on view rates, impressions and unduplicated reach for their ads. The service, which has tracked ad activity for three years, now provides this data for national and local ads watched on TV screens whether they're viewed live, time shifted, or via VOD or OTT. With all the changes in how audiences watch TV, "more and more ads are becoming decoupled from the programs themselves, and a lot of brands and networks are starting to move towards audience-based buying," said Sean Muller, iSpot.tv founder and CEO. "On top of that, digital has taught brands the power of being responsive with their media in general. So now, brands are really trying to become more responsive with television." The company is utilizing technology embedded into the firmware of 10 million TV sets in the U.S. that detects any kind of content, including ads, on the screens. iSpot.tv tags ads in its commercial catalog using fingerprint technology and tracks them on the screen with ACR, or automatic content recognition, no matter what kind of device is connected to the television

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Broadcast TV Is Still Outpacing Netflix’s Top Shows by Millions of Viewers Per Episode

January 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hit streaming shows on Netflix and Amazon may seem to be pulling huge audiences, but they're still lagging far behind TV's top programs, according to data obtained exclusively by Adweek. Multiplatform measurement firm Symphony Advanced Media—whose data was recently used by NBC as evidence the network was staying well ahead of Netflix—has released a new round of viewership stats showing the biggest shows in streaming still don't measure up to broadcast's top series. Symphony's VideoPulse measurement tool looked at the average 18- to 49-year-old audience per episode within the first 35 days of broadcast, and includes DVR, on-demand and streaming data in addition to live viewing. While some of this data was shared by NBCU ratings guru Alan Wurtzel last week , the data released today offers a more complete picture of the 18-49 audience last fall per episode on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and Crackle's original series. Here's how many people watched each episode of top streaming shows over a 35-day period this past fall, according to Symphony: Marvel's Jessica Jones (Netflix): 4.81 million* Master of None (Netflix): 3.92 million Narcos (Netflix): 3.21 million** The Man in the High Castle (Amazon): 2.12 million* Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp (Netflix): 832,000** Transparent (Amazon): 653,000*** Orange is the New Black (Netflix): 644,000** Hemlock Grove (Netflix): 597,000 Dinotrux (Netflix): 534,000** Casual (Hulu, ongoing series): 491,000 The Hotwives of Las Vegas (Hulu, ongoing series): 336,000 Longmire (Netflix): 139,000 The Art of More (Crackle): 80,000* Bojack Horseman (Netflix): 64,000** Project Mc2 (Netflix): 42,000** * These titles were released later in fall, so the measurement reflects between 31 and 35 days of viewing. ** These titles were released before Sept. 1, when Symphony's measurement began, so the data reflects viewing between Sept. 1 and Oct. 6. *** Measurement only includes 21 days of episode 1 (released Nov. 30), and 10 days for the other nine episodes (released on Dec. 11). Symphony's data shows the continued resilience of Netflix's summer hits like Wet Hot American Summer and Orange is the New Black, which outrated "new" Hulu programming, even though they premiered months earlier. Narcos premiered Aug. 28, just a few days before VideoPulse's measurement began

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From Reducing Ad Loads to Declaring War on Netflix, Here’s How the TV Industry Is Gearing Up for 2016

January 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, have spent the past two weeks at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour, sharing their plans for midseason and beyond. (You can find all of Adweek's TCA coverage here .) In addition to trotting out the new shows they hope will connect with audiences, the networks also addressed the industry's larger issues—chiefly, how to stay relevant in a dramatically-shifting landscape—and how to solve them. Here are the five biggest takeaways from the TCA winter press tour, and the most significant ways the industry will change this year: 1. Reducing ad loads to entice and keep viewers. "TV is the best advertising delivery mechanism ever invented. It's unparalleled for building brands and moving consumers, but we have overstuffed the bird" and diluted the effectiveness of ads, said Kevin Reilly, president of TNT and TBS, and chief creative officer of Turner Entertainment. That's why as part of his dramatic overhaul of TNT and TBS, Reilly is going to reduce the ad load on TNT's three new dramas this year by more than half , which will add eight to 10 minutes of program time per hour. (Turner is pursuing a similar strategy for truTV .) Fewer, more effective ads are essential to "create a better viewing experience," Reilly said. And if networks want to keep audiences from flocking to Netflix, reducing their "overstuffed" ad load is a solid first step. 2. The best way to make a series premiere stand out: Drop the ads. Sensing a trend here? Sometimes reducing ads isn't enough: Some networks are eliminating them altogether in order to make a splash of their series premieres. Syfy led the charge with The Magicians debut last month , and at least one other network is following suit. WGN America will premiere its next two series—Outsiders on Jan. 26, and Underground on March 9—without ads. "In today's competitive landscape, we felt it was important for viewers to get as pure and as uninterrupted an introduction to these worlds as possible," said Matt Cherniss, president and GM for WGN America and Tribune Studios. 3. Even more TV is on the way—for at least one more year. A record 412 scripted series aired last year , along with an additional 750 unscripted series.

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Netflix Returns Fire, Says NBC Has ‘Remarkably Inaccurate Data’ and 18-49 Demo ‘Means Nothing’

January 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix has kept its ratings metrics under lock and key for several years, refusing to share that data even with the creators of its own original series. So predictably, the streaming service was none too thrilled last week when NBC shared Netflix ratings data from Symphony Advanced Media , which measured the 18-49 demographic of each Netflix episode released last fall. Ted Sarandos, Netflix's chief content officer, returned fire today as he spoke at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour and blasted the "remarkably inaccurate data" from NBC and Symphony. "The methodology and the measurement and the data itself doesn't reflect any sense of reality of anything that we keep track of," said Sarandos, who noted that the 18-49 demographic that Symphony measured "is so insignificant to us that I can't even tell you how many 18-49 year old members we have. …It's an advertising-driven demographic that means nothing to Netflix." Sarandos took a shot at NBC, which in addition to releasing that data said that Netflix doesn't yet pose a "consistent" threat to broadcasters . "Why would NBC use their lunch slot with you to talk about our ratings? Maybe because it's more fun than talking about NBC ratings!" said Sarandos of NBC, which is comfortably leading all networks in adults 18-49. "There is not an apples to apples comparison to Netflix watching and any reported Nielsen rating," said Sarandos, though as usual, he declined to give any specific metrics. "I do think that once we give a number for a show, then every number will be benchmarked off of that show," he said , explaining that some Netflix series are "built for 2 million people" while others are "built for 30 million…that puts a lot of creative pressure on the talent that we don't want to." However, Netflix did make an exception to its "no ratings" mantra by recently sharing some metrics about its original movies Beasts of No Nation and The Ridiculous Six. "A movie with no box office is different than a show with no TV ratings," Sarandos said. "We also wanted to give some people some sense that the investment was making sense." About the only data that Sarandos would provide about Netflix viewing: "somewhere in the world, every second of every day, someone is pushing play to start a Netflix original show." Netflix will spend $6 billion on content in 2016, a figure which covers both original and acquired series, and offer "more than 600 hours of new, high quality original content," said Sarandos. That includes returning shows Marvel's Daredevil (Season 2 debuts March 18) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (April 15), Grace & Frankie (May 6), Orange is the New Black (June 17). Additionally, Netflix announced today that Marvel's Jessica Jones has been picked up for a second season. Netflix is also rolling out several new series—including Will Arnett comedy Flaked (premiering March 11), Ashton Kutcher comedy The Ranch (April 1), French drama Marseille (May 5) and Baz Luhrmann's music drama The Get Down (Aug. 12)‚ while also "doubling down" on kids and family series, launching 20 more of those this year. Despite that overwhelming volume of original content, "we don't think there's too much TV. And if there is too much TV, someone else is going to have to slow down, because we have big plans for 2016 and beyond," said Sarandos. And even as it has accelerated its output, "we don't think we've sacrificed an ounce of quality." Netflix, which is now available in 190 countries, said it thinks globally, not domestically.

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Turner Shakes Up Its Ad Sales Division to Streamline Agency and Client Partnerships

December 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How big is the Turner Ad Sales reorganization the company unveiled today? Very, according to president Donna Speciale. "This is basically the beginning of reimagining advertising," she said. That's a tall order, but Speciale has spent more than three years preparing for the moves, which she said will streamline agency and client partnerships while boosting ROI for clients. The biggest change is the addition of a new unit Speciale called "critical." The Client Strategy and Ad Innovation unit will be led by Michael Strober, who was recently promoted to evp after previously serving as svp, entertainment sales.

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Giant Sexting Emojis Welcome a Condom for Threesomes in MTV’s ‘Sext Life’ Ad

December 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Sexytime gets weird, and then weirder, in Y&R New York's amusing new commercial for MTV's Staying Alive Foundation, featuring actors dressed up as common sexting emoji pairs suddenly getting joined by giant condoms. Banana and donut, eggplant and peach, pointer finger and OK sign—these emoji partners all embark on amorous trysts, but apparently (like the teens the spot is aimed at) they aren't using protection. That changes when wrapped condoms join the fun. The tagline is: "Make foreplay a threesome. Add a condom." The campaign, timed to World AIDS Day on Tuesday, includes a condom emoji keyboard built by Snaps, available at safesext.mtv.com. (Yes, Durex has been campaigning to create a condom emoji, but hasn't scored so far, so this is the next best thing for sexts.) The spot was directed by Oscar-winning film editor Angus Wall. The emoji costumes were made by Casey Storm, costume designer for Where the Wild Things Are.

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South Park Hysterically Satirized Ad Blocking and Sponsored Content

November 19, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

South Park's 19th season has been unusually strong, thanks to a season-long storyline involving topics like political correctness and gentrification. "Sponsored Content," last night's episode of the Comedy Central hit, was one of its best yet in 2015. Show creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone hilariously took on several of the issues advertisers have been grappling with, including ad blocking and sponsored content. In the episode, the elementary school's new principal, PC Principal, informs the student editor of the school newspaper, Jimmy, that he can no longer distribute the paper in school until the content is pre-approved. Jimmy refuses and instead delivers it door to door, to the delight of parents who are finally able to enjoy news stories that aren't obstructed by ads. "There's no ads, no sponsored content, no links to click on," says one overjoyed parent, Stephen. He then goes off on this rant about the insanity of reading content online: "Do you know how long it's been since I was just able to sit back and read the news? I got so used to getting news off the internet, but I feel like I'm always trying to chase the news somehow. It's like I'm in a black void trying to reach the news story, but then the next thing I know, I'm reading an ad for Geico.

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How Trevor Noah Is Making The Daily Show His Own, Without Changing It Completely

November 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On Sept. 28, the final piece of the recast late-night lineup clicked into place with the debut of The Daily Show With Trevor Noah . Replacing an icon like Jon Stewart after 16 years would be a daunting task for anybody, much less a relative unknown like the 31-year-old South African comedian. But Noah started strong ("Assured, handsome and with a crisp delivery, Mr. Noah was a smoother presenter than Mr. Stewart," proclaimed The New York Times), and he has improved markedly every night since. When Stewart announced in February that he was stepping down as Daily Show host, Comedy Central offered the job to big names like Amy Schumer before settling on Noah, who started as a Daily Show contributor last December. The network is betting on Noah's long-term potential to reach millennial audiences (see " In Just Nine Months, Comedy Central Reshaped Late Night—and Kept Advertisers Happy "), and so far, so good. While ratings have dipped versus Stewart (which Comedy Central anticipated), more than half of the show's 18-34 audience is new to the show under Noah, according to the network. Meanwhile, advertisers have stayed loyal. According to SQAD NetCosts, The Daily Show with Trevor Noah boasts the second-highest 30-second ad rates in late night, behind only The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. After wrapping his first few weeks in the chair, Noah sat with Adweek to talk about easing into his role, what he thinks about brand integrations, plus the crazy consumerism that has come to define the holidays in America and the world. Adweek: Some worried that you would completely overhaul The Daily Show, but it was clear from your first night that this was the same program that audiences knew and loved. What was behind that choice?

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