Posts Tagged ‘media’

NAB’s Gordon Smith Is Confident He Can Turn Things Around in Washington

April 11, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Broadcasters are having a tough time in Washington. A number of efforts are aimed straight at the business from the FCC's recent decision to tighten ownership rules and claw bag big chunks of the broadcast spectrum for wireless, to a very vocal pay TV lobby pushing hard on Congress to reform retransmission consent. With so much going against them, it's easy to conclude that the broadcasting lobby, once the most powerful lobby on the Hill, may be on the outs. Certainly the media has lost the glamour crown to the Internet. But calling the broadcasting industry a dinosaur may be a premature conclusion. Wrapping up the industry's national convention in Las Vegas this week, Gordon Smith, president and CEO of the National Association of Broadcasters, remains confident he can turn things around. "While I may be frustrated, I'm not discouraged because I know how this ends," Smith said. Smith, a former Senator, spent the week talking with broadcasters, FCC commissioners and staffers, even holding a closed-door meeting with FCC chairman Tom Wheeler, who right now is enemy no. 1 among broadcasters. Coming off a very unpopular FCC vote that made it a lot tougher for two TV stations to share advertising sales, Wheeler faced a hostile audience. He put on his best charm offensive to try and convince broadcasters that he wasn't out to destroy the business.

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Dick Clark Productions Is Dramatically Increasing Its Output

April 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This year, dick clark productions will present some 100 televised musical performances, most of them live and in prime time. Roughly double 2013’s count, that tally includes regulars such as the American Music Awards, the Billboard Music Awards and signature Dick Clark’s Rockin’ New Years Eve , and newcomers such as the Hollywood Film Awards on CBS, the People Magazine Awards on NBC and the U.S. version of Israeli singing competition Rising Star on ABC. Adweek spoke with Allen Shapiro, CEO of dcp, and company president Mike Mahan, about sponsors, social media and the live TV revival. (Disclosure: dick clark productions and Adweek are owned by affiliates of Guggenheim Partners.)

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MIPTV: History Is the Future for Documentary Producers

April 6, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

CANNES — “History is doing really well for us,” said Andrea Harrick, director of acquisitions at Blue Ant Media, which runs a bouquet of channels in Canada. Harrick, who was speaking Saturday at MipTV sister event Mipdoc, added that other genres popular with audiences included shows about the paranormal, crypto-zoology, such as shows about Bigfoot,... Read more

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Turner Taps Donna Speciale to Oversee Integrated TV, Digital Sales

March 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the eve of the 2014-15 upfront,

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Aaron Swartz Doc to Open 2014 Hot Docs Festival

March 18, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The 2014 Hot Docs Intl. Documentary Festival will open April 24 in Toronto with the international premiere of Brian Knappenberger’s “The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz” (Film Buff/Participant Media). The 21st annual Hot Docs docu fest, confab and mart will unspool 197 titles from 43 countries. Special Presentations will present the world... Read more

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Anne Sweeney Is Leaving Disney

March 11, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Walt Disney Co. on Tuesday announced that Anne Sweeney is leaving the company, effective January 2015, so that she may devote time to directing. An 18-year Disney veteran, Sweeney currently serves as co-chair of Disney Media Networks and president of the Disney/ABC Television Group. John Skipper is the Mouse House’s other co-chair, and he also is president of ESPN. Sweeney joined Disney in 1996, signing on as president of Disney Channel and evp of Disney/ABC Cable Networks. Before that, she was president and CEO of FX Networks. Sweeney broke the news to The Hollywood Reporter . Shortly, after that story went live, Disney issued an official press release. “I’ve been a part of an amazing evolution in our business and our industry, and have achieved far more than I ever thought possible,” Sweeney said, by way of announcing her decision to move on. “But as wonderful as the experience has been, there has always been a nagging voice in the back of my head pushing me to step out of the comfort zone of the executive ranks and more directly into the creative arena that enticed me to TV in the first place.” Sweeney went on to add that while her plan to walk away from corporate life to pursue a discipline in which she is untutored may seem a bit peculiar, directing a TV series would prove to be the culmination of “a long realized dream.” She then thanked Disney chairman and CEO Bob Iger for his “leadership, guidance and his friendship over the years,” before saying that Iger had offered her an extension on her contract. Sweeney will remain in place through the end of the year, where she looks to “position the TV Group for even greater success.” For his part, Iger credited Sweeney with growing Disney Channel into a global powerhouse while making ABC “a strong, successful content creation engine.” He went on to “applaud Anne for knowing what she wants out of life and for having the courage to follow her dream.” While a short list of executives is rumored to be in line to succeed Iger when he steps down in June 2016, Sweeney’s name is rarely listed among them

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The Story of Kids TV Mastermind Fred Seibert

March 11, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fred Seibert is sitting in his New York office, filled with Legos and comic books, talking enthusiastically about his first big failure. Thirty-two years ago, Seibert was hired away from his agency, Fred/Alan, by Turner executive Scott Sassa after Turner acquired Hanna-Barbera , the animation studio behind series including Scooby Doo and Space Ghost. Ted Turner was in love with his new toy, though others at the company wanted to shut it down. “Ted won’t close the studio because he thinks it’s cool,” Sassa told Seibert at the time. Sassa didn’t want to close it either, though Hanna-Barbera was a seriously distressed asset. Please, Sassa asked Seibert—who had rebranded Nickelodeon a few years earlier—fix this thing. The first decision Seibert made was to green-light two cartoons: Swat Kats: The Radical Squadron (yes, this was the ’90s) and a much better series called 2 Stupid Dogs . Swat Kats, Seibert now admits, was a boring, by-the-numbers action cartoon he thought could capitalize on current trends, while 2 Stupid Dogs had that certain something he hoped could turn into a marketing bonanza: It was odd

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FCC Chairman’s Proposal to Prohibit Joint Sales Deals Strikes Partisan Nerve

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler's proposal to inhibit joint sales agreements between TV stations is already shaping up to be a fight that will split along party lines. With Commissioner Mike O'Rielly's statement released Monday—which supports keeping JSAs as an option for small-market broadcasters—both Republican commissioners have publicly expressed their opposition to Wheeler's proposed change, which will be on the agency's agenda at the end of the month. Wheeler has called joint sales agreements, where one TV stations sells advertising time for another, a loophole in the ownership rules that allow big broadcasters to essentially own a second station without having that count as ownership.

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Turner, CBS Outdoor Tip Off NYC Subway Media Play

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In what’s being billed as the biggest underground digital out-of-home network to date, CBS Outdoor and Turner Broadcasting System have teamed up to bring a little dazzle to the New York City subway system. Under its recently launched Ignite: Innovations Lab initiative, CBS Outdoor has installed 10 big video screens in some of Manhattan’s busiest commuter hubs, including the MTA stations at Times Square, Herald Square and Columbus Circle. Standing 66 inches, or five-and-a-half feet high, and about three feet wide, the new video installations have been deployed ahead of CBS and Turner’s joint March Madness coverage. While Turner will use the screens to promote the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship , it will also stream promos for its entertainment and news programming on TNT, TBS, truTV, Adult Swim and CNN. While the screens have been set up to maximize impressions in advance of March Madness, the deal will keep the units lit through at least March 2015. According to Dennis Camlek, svp, Turner Media Group, the subway screen loops are about five minutes in duration, and all content is fed to the displays from the Atlanta campus. Camlek said that content can be swapped out practically in real time, with a lag of 30 seconds at the most. While the colors and images displayed on the screens are particularly dynamic, there is no associated audio feed. “That was something we went back and forth on,” Camlek said. “But because the MTA’s safety messages are of the utmost importance, we thought we’d hang back on the audio.” Camlek added that while the 10 screens will be seen by a great number of TV viewers—approximately 7 million commuters walk through the NYC subway turnstiles every day—the number of media buyers and other agency personnel that will pass the displays is a nice bonus. “It’s both consumer- and industry facing,” Camlek said

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Meet 12 of the Biggest Young Stars on YouTube

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a way, it all started with Fred Figglehorn, a chipmunk-voiced, fictional 6-year-old with a dysfunctional family, manic energy and anger issues who proved to be catnip to young viewers on YouTube.

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