Posts Tagged ‘media’

Broadcast TV Is Still Outpacing Netflix’s Top Shows by Millions of Viewers Per Episode

January 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hit streaming shows on Netflix and Amazon may seem to be pulling huge audiences, but they're still lagging far behind TV's top programs, according to data obtained exclusively by Adweek. Multiplatform measurement firm Symphony Advanced Media—whose data was recently used by NBC as evidence the network was staying well ahead of Netflix—has released a new round of viewership stats showing the biggest shows in streaming still don't measure up to broadcast's top series. Symphony's VideoPulse measurement tool looked at the average 18- to 49-year-old audience per episode within the first 35 days of broadcast, and includes DVR, on-demand and streaming data in addition to live viewing. While some of this data was shared by NBCU ratings guru Alan Wurtzel last week , the data released today offers a more complete picture of the 18-49 audience last fall per episode on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and Crackle's original series. Here's how many people watched each episode of top streaming shows over a 35-day period this past fall, according to Symphony: Marvel's Jessica Jones (Netflix): 4.81 million* Master of None (Netflix): 3.92 million Narcos (Netflix): 3.21 million** The Man in the High Castle (Amazon): 2.12 million* Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp (Netflix): 832,000** Transparent (Amazon): 653,000*** Orange is the New Black (Netflix): 644,000** Hemlock Grove (Netflix): 597,000 Dinotrux (Netflix): 534,000** Casual (Hulu, ongoing series): 491,000 The Hotwives of Las Vegas (Hulu, ongoing series): 336,000 Longmire (Netflix): 139,000 The Art of More (Crackle): 80,000* Bojack Horseman (Netflix): 64,000** Project Mc2 (Netflix): 42,000** * These titles were released later in fall, so the measurement reflects between 31 and 35 days of viewing. ** These titles were released before Sept. 1, when Symphony's measurement began, so the data reflects viewing between Sept. 1 and Oct. 6. *** Measurement only includes 21 days of episode 1 (released Nov. 30), and 10 days for the other nine episodes (released on Dec. 11). Symphony's data shows the continued resilience of Netflix's summer hits like Wet Hot American Summer and Orange is the New Black, which outrated "new" Hulu programming, even though they premiered months earlier. Narcos premiered Aug. 28, just a few days before VideoPulse's measurement began

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From Reducing Ad Loads to Declaring War on Netflix, Here’s How the TV Industry Is Gearing Up for 2016

January 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, have spent the past two weeks at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour, sharing their plans for midseason and beyond. (You can find all of Adweek's TCA coverage here .) In addition to trotting out the new shows they hope will connect with audiences, the networks also addressed the industry's larger issues—chiefly, how to stay relevant in a dramatically-shifting landscape—and how to solve them. Here are the five biggest takeaways from the TCA winter press tour, and the most significant ways the industry will change this year: 1. Reducing ad loads to entice and keep viewers. "TV is the best advertising delivery mechanism ever invented. It's unparalleled for building brands and moving consumers, but we have overstuffed the bird" and diluted the effectiveness of ads, said Kevin Reilly, president of TNT and TBS, and chief creative officer of Turner Entertainment. That's why as part of his dramatic overhaul of TNT and TBS, Reilly is going to reduce the ad load on TNT's three new dramas this year by more than half , which will add eight to 10 minutes of program time per hour. (Turner is pursuing a similar strategy for truTV .) Fewer, more effective ads are essential to "create a better viewing experience," Reilly said. And if networks want to keep audiences from flocking to Netflix, reducing their "overstuffed" ad load is a solid first step. 2. The best way to make a series premiere stand out: Drop the ads. Sensing a trend here? Sometimes reducing ads isn't enough: Some networks are eliminating them altogether in order to make a splash of their series premieres. Syfy led the charge with The Magicians debut last month , and at least one other network is following suit. WGN America will premiere its next two series—Outsiders on Jan. 26, and Underground on March 9—without ads. "In today's competitive landscape, we felt it was important for viewers to get as pure and as uninterrupted an introduction to these worlds as possible," said Matt Cherniss, president and GM for WGN America and Tribune Studios. 3. Even more TV is on the way—for at least one more year. A record 412 scripted series aired last year , along with an additional 750 unscripted series.

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Netflix Returns Fire, Says NBC Has ‘Remarkably Inaccurate Data’ and 18-49 Demo ‘Means Nothing’

January 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix has kept its ratings metrics under lock and key for several years, refusing to share that data even with the creators of its own original series. So predictably, the streaming service was none too thrilled last week when NBC shared Netflix ratings data from Symphony Advanced Media , which measured the 18-49 demographic of each Netflix episode released last fall. Ted Sarandos, Netflix's chief content officer, returned fire today as he spoke at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour and blasted the "remarkably inaccurate data" from NBC and Symphony. "The methodology and the measurement and the data itself doesn't reflect any sense of reality of anything that we keep track of," said Sarandos, who noted that the 18-49 demographic that Symphony measured "is so insignificant to us that I can't even tell you how many 18-49 year old members we have. …It's an advertising-driven demographic that means nothing to Netflix." Sarandos took a shot at NBC, which in addition to releasing that data said that Netflix doesn't yet pose a "consistent" threat to broadcasters . "Why would NBC use their lunch slot with you to talk about our ratings? Maybe because it's more fun than talking about NBC ratings!" said Sarandos of NBC, which is comfortably leading all networks in adults 18-49. "There is not an apples to apples comparison to Netflix watching and any reported Nielsen rating," said Sarandos, though as usual, he declined to give any specific metrics. "I do think that once we give a number for a show, then every number will be benchmarked off of that show," he said , explaining that some Netflix series are "built for 2 million people" while others are "built for 30 million…that puts a lot of creative pressure on the talent that we don't want to." However, Netflix did make an exception to its "no ratings" mantra by recently sharing some metrics about its original movies Beasts of No Nation and The Ridiculous Six. "A movie with no box office is different than a show with no TV ratings," Sarandos said. "We also wanted to give some people some sense that the investment was making sense." About the only data that Sarandos would provide about Netflix viewing: "somewhere in the world, every second of every day, someone is pushing play to start a Netflix original show." Netflix will spend $6 billion on content in 2016, a figure which covers both original and acquired series, and offer "more than 600 hours of new, high quality original content," said Sarandos. That includes returning shows Marvel's Daredevil (Season 2 debuts March 18) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (April 15), Grace & Frankie (May 6), Orange is the New Black (June 17). Additionally, Netflix announced today that Marvel's Jessica Jones has been picked up for a second season. Netflix is also rolling out several new series—including Will Arnett comedy Flaked (premiering March 11), Ashton Kutcher comedy The Ranch (April 1), French drama Marseille (May 5) and Baz Luhrmann's music drama The Get Down (Aug. 12)‚ while also "doubling down" on kids and family series, launching 20 more of those this year. Despite that overwhelming volume of original content, "we don't think there's too much TV. And if there is too much TV, someone else is going to have to slow down, because we have big plans for 2016 and beyond," said Sarandos. And even as it has accelerated its output, "we don't think we've sacrificed an ounce of quality." Netflix, which is now available in 190 countries, said it thinks globally, not domestically.

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Turner Shakes Up Its Ad Sales Division to Streamline Agency and Client Partnerships

December 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How big is the Turner Ad Sales reorganization the company unveiled today? Very, according to president Donna Speciale. "This is basically the beginning of reimagining advertising," she said. That's a tall order, but Speciale has spent more than three years preparing for the moves, which she said will streamline agency and client partnerships while boosting ROI for clients. The biggest change is the addition of a new unit Speciale called "critical." The Client Strategy and Ad Innovation unit will be led by Michael Strober, who was recently promoted to evp after previously serving as svp, entertainment sales.

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Giant Sexting Emojis Welcome a Condom for Threesomes in MTV’s ‘Sext Life’ Ad

December 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Sexytime gets weird, and then weirder, in Y&R New York's amusing new commercial for MTV's Staying Alive Foundation, featuring actors dressed up as common sexting emoji pairs suddenly getting joined by giant condoms. Banana and donut, eggplant and peach, pointer finger and OK sign—these emoji partners all embark on amorous trysts, but apparently (like the teens the spot is aimed at) they aren't using protection. That changes when wrapped condoms join the fun. The tagline is: "Make foreplay a threesome. Add a condom." The campaign, timed to World AIDS Day on Tuesday, includes a condom emoji keyboard built by Snaps, available at safesext.mtv.com. (Yes, Durex has been campaigning to create a condom emoji, but hasn't scored so far, so this is the next best thing for sexts.) The spot was directed by Oscar-winning film editor Angus Wall. The emoji costumes were made by Casey Storm, costume designer for Where the Wild Things Are.

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South Park Hysterically Satirized Ad Blocking and Sponsored Content

November 19, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

South Park's 19th season has been unusually strong, thanks to a season-long storyline involving topics like political correctness and gentrification. "Sponsored Content," last night's episode of the Comedy Central hit, was one of its best yet in 2015. Show creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone hilariously took on several of the issues advertisers have been grappling with, including ad blocking and sponsored content. In the episode, the elementary school's new principal, PC Principal, informs the student editor of the school newspaper, Jimmy, that he can no longer distribute the paper in school until the content is pre-approved. Jimmy refuses and instead delivers it door to door, to the delight of parents who are finally able to enjoy news stories that aren't obstructed by ads. "There's no ads, no sponsored content, no links to click on," says one overjoyed parent, Stephen. He then goes off on this rant about the insanity of reading content online: "Do you know how long it's been since I was just able to sit back and read the news? I got so used to getting news off the internet, but I feel like I'm always trying to chase the news somehow. It's like I'm in a black void trying to reach the news story, but then the next thing I know, I'm reading an ad for Geico.

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How Trevor Noah Is Making The Daily Show His Own, Without Changing It Completely

November 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On Sept. 28, the final piece of the recast late-night lineup clicked into place with the debut of The Daily Show With Trevor Noah . Replacing an icon like Jon Stewart after 16 years would be a daunting task for anybody, much less a relative unknown like the 31-year-old South African comedian. But Noah started strong ("Assured, handsome and with a crisp delivery, Mr. Noah was a smoother presenter than Mr. Stewart," proclaimed The New York Times), and he has improved markedly every night since. When Stewart announced in February that he was stepping down as Daily Show host, Comedy Central offered the job to big names like Amy Schumer before settling on Noah, who started as a Daily Show contributor last December. The network is betting on Noah's long-term potential to reach millennial audiences (see " In Just Nine Months, Comedy Central Reshaped Late Night—and Kept Advertisers Happy "), and so far, so good. While ratings have dipped versus Stewart (which Comedy Central anticipated), more than half of the show's 18-34 audience is new to the show under Noah, according to the network. Meanwhile, advertisers have stayed loyal. According to SQAD NetCosts, The Daily Show with Trevor Noah boasts the second-highest 30-second ad rates in late night, behind only The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. After wrapping his first few weeks in the chair, Noah sat with Adweek to talk about easing into his role, what he thinks about brand integrations, plus the crazy consumerism that has come to define the holidays in America and the world. Adweek: Some worried that you would completely overhaul The Daily Show, but it was clear from your first night that this was the same program that audiences knew and loved. What was behind that choice?

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This New Measurement Tool Shows Millennials Are Watching as Much TV as Anyone

September 22, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the new TV season kicks off with 22 new shows debuting over the next month, networks and advertisers will begin to make sense of which series are clicking with viewers and which ones will get axed. But in the current TV marketplace of fragmented viewership, networks have been complaining that Nielsen no longer provides an adequate measurement of who's really watching their shows. "We're not getting measured accurately and were losing a lot of people," said Alan Wurtzel, NBCUniversal's president of research and media development, during an industry meeting this morning. Wurtzel estimated that 15 percent to 35 percent of viewers who watch on other platforms are not getting counted. "And it's only growing," he added. VideoPulse, which was unveiled this morning, is a new TV multiplatform measurement tool from Symphony Advanced Media looking to finally crack that code. It's a cloud-based service that captures live media usage by individuals across OTT, VOD, Web, mobile, gaming devices, DVR and linear TV. Data comes from the 15,000 users who have already signed up to be tracked; Symphony hopes to have 50,000 within the next year. The data VideoPulse has already gathered goes against the idea that millennials aren't watching TV—they just aren't watching the way previous generations did. According to traditional TV measurement from Nielsen, millennial viewing has dropped 30 percent over the past five years. But VideoPulse found that 25 percent of viewing among millennials is on DVRs and over-the-top services and happens outside the Live+7 window, not measured by Nielsen. "There has been a significant void in understanding how consumers are using nontraditional media platforms, but innovation has finally arrived in the media-measurement space," said Charles Buchwalter, president and CEO of Symphony Advanced Media. Buchwalter says the product will "track the cross-media, cross-platform behavior of consumers in the fastest growing mode of TV and video viewing, allowing the market to extend beyond the current industry-accepted norm of Live viewing plus seven days ratings." The product—which is available immediately for advertisers, agencies and media companies—is already undergoing beta testing by NBC, Viacom, Warner Bros. Media Research and A+E Networks. "Our industry has been disadvantaged by legacy-measurement approaches that have failed to evolve with consumers' increasing use of media platforms," said Liz Huszarik, evp, Warner Bros. Media Research & Insights. "We are hopeful that by working with Symphony Advanced Media's VideoPulse that we can capture an accurate picture of consumers' total TV/video usage across platforms and devices with a transparency that's been missing from other vendors." VideoPulse also includes data from streaming services—most notably Netflix—which so far hasn't been divulged

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How FX Is Facing Down the Challenges of Promoting Season 2 of The Strain

July 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Devising a marketing campaign for the return of 2014's top-rated freshman cable scripted series among adults 18-49 might seem easy—all those viewers will simply come back for more, right? But FX isn't taking anything for granted when it comes to promoting The Strain's July 12 return. That's because no matter how successful Season 1 was—Guillermo del Toro and Carlton Cuse's vampire thriller was the No. 8 overall scripted cable series in the demo with 2.4 million viewers in live-plus-seven—marketing a show's second and third seasons is a tougher challenge. "For us, Season 2 and Season 3 are more important, because Season 1 you have the benefit of newness. It's like a romance—it's very easy to fall in love the first three months," said Stephanie Gibbons, FX's president of marketing and digital media. But after that, "all these other shows are competing for attention and love

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Brian Williams Gives Interview to Matt Lauer to Begin His ‘Comeback’

June 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Brian Williams will be permanently pulled from the anchor chair of NBC Nightly News but will remain with the network, according to multiple reports. NBC News is not commenting as the details of Williams' role have not been finalized. CNN, which was first to report the news last night, now reports Williams has taped an interview with Matt Lauer, describing it as a "comeback attempt." Williams, who'd just signed on for another five years with Nightly News in December, saw his job come to an abrupt end a month later when it was revealed he had been fabricating stories about his coverage during the early days of the Iraq War. An investigation revealed other tall tales Williams told mostly on late-night talk shows. "By his actions, Brian has jeopardized the trust millions of Americans place in NBC News," NBCUniversal president Steve Burke said as he suspended his multi-million dollar anchor for six months. "His actions are inexcusable, and this suspension is severe and appropriate." While the suspension has become permanent, Williams will stay with the network, likely returning to MSNBC in a role that hasn't been defined yet

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