Posts Tagged ‘media’

The Company Behind Uproxx Targets the Elusive Millennial Male in New Partnership with Forbes

May 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The millennial male is one of the toughest demographics for brands to attract. Digital media companies struggle to figure out what exactly makes young guys tick. Woven Digital thinks it knows. Led by CEO Colin Digiaro and Chief Creative Officer Ben Blank, Woven is a pop culture-focused digital media and content company that's home to guy-friendly brands such as Uproxx, BroBible, Dime Magazine, and most recently, HitFix. It's presenting its new slate to advertisers tonight, capping off the first week of the Digital Content NewFronts. In person, Digiaro and Blank are laid back, engaging guys who are passionate about their work and confident in Woven's ability to capture this notoriously hard-to-reach audience. Woven claims half of 18- to 34-year-old men have visited the network of sites, which boasts 60 million monthly unique visitors and 120 million monthly video views. Its recent acquisition of popular entertainment news site HitFix will only add to that number. Woven produces a myriad of digital series for Uproxx. The ad-supported episodes are typically 5-to-10 minutes, focusing on a range of topics like science and tech (Luminaries), music (Uncharted), sports (Underbelly) and stories of inspiration (Human). Digiaro and Blank made it clear that millennial males have varied interests, and that these short docuseries allow sophisticated young guys to tell their personal stories and show off their talents and passions. Woven has partnered with Honda, Toyota and MillerCoors in the past, and this fall, it will partner with Forbes for the launch of Forbes Founders, a new video series centered around unique stories of millennial entrepreneurs. "We develop shows and share stories that are many times overlooked by traditional media outlets," said Blank. "Partnering with Forbes to find and highlight some of the most intelligent and intriguing millennial entrepreneurs out there allows us to continue pushing the boundaries of traditional storytelling." Woven and Forbes collaborated to identify and feature interesting, smart and capable millennial entrepreneurs who want to change the way people live and succeed, now and in the future. "Forbes Media is always looking for new and unique ways to engage with its audience," said Tom Davis, Chief Marketing Officer at Forbes Media. "The Forbes Founders video series is aligned with our mission to share interesting stories of success and highlight what entrepreneurs do with that success." The Forbes Founders series is the newest addition to the Woven Digital Original series slate, and will begin airing in Fall 2016 on Uproxx, Forbes and other Woven Digital properties.

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Hulu Is Targeting Living Room Viewers With New Interactive Advertising Deals

May 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hulu spent much of last year improving the quality of its content and striking big deals for new and acquired series like Casual, Difficult People, The Mindy Project, 11.22.63 and all nine seasons of Seinfeld. This year, the streaming service is focusing on improving the experience of watching that content, especially in the comfort of viewers' own homes. Hulu's subscriber base has grown more than 30 percent from last year, and will reach 12 million U.S. subscribers by this month. "Hulu is TV, and the fact that 70 percent of our viewing happens in a living room environment just reinforces that idea to the market," said Peter Naylor, svp of advertising sales with Hulu. That's why many of the company's big announcements at Wednesday morning's NewFronts event at the Theater at Madison Square Garden center around initiatives relating to what Naylor calls the "living room," but refer to any viewing via connected TV devices like Roku, Apple TV, PlayStation or smart TVs. Hulu has teamed with interactive advertising company BrightLine to bring interactive advertising to connected TV devices for the first time. Havas Media will be the exclusive charter agency for the new ads, which debut on Hulu this summer. It will allow viewers to interact with the creative itself much as they would on a computer or mobile device. They can click on the ad and be taken to a site or page with details about a particular brand

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Editor’s Note: Video Is the Latest Battlefront in the Struggle for Consumers’ Attention

May 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In pulling together our annual Video Issue this year, which we publish on the first day of the fifth annual Digital Content NewFronts , I had to gut check our coverage plan several times as news hit during the weeks just before deadline that altered and elevated digital video's place in the media and marketing landscape. Facebook, for example, continues to shape the future. Video is definitely a priority for the social giant, and Facebook Live video content is being created by a wide array of publishers, including Adweek, and viewed there at growing pace and volume. And at its F8 conference earlier this month, Facebook dropped a considerable amount of new innovation into the marketplace that will have a material effect on video and pretty much every modern media form. I'm still noodling over the mashup of Messenger, brands and chatbots. Is it AI-powered marketing at scale?

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Put Away the Selfie Stick and Live Like a Local, Urges Airbnb’s New Campaign

April 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Travelers today, especially those using Airbnb to find lodging around the world, don't want to navigate throngs of other tourists for a glimpse of Times Square or Fisherman's Wharf. According to data from Airbnb, 86 percent of its users pick the platform because they want to live more like a local. That insight of living rather than visiting inspired the brand's latest and largest marketing campaign, "Live There." "Don't go to Paris. Don't tour Paris, and please don't do Paris," the ad's narrator advises over footage of selfie sticks and packed tour boats. Instead, the ad advises, "Live in Paris." The work, from agency TBWAChiatDay is aimed at younger travelers, or at least those young in spirit. It's focused not just on the millennial generation, but also on those who want to eat at local restaurants, meet local artists and avoid tourist traps. According to Airbnb, 52 percent of these younger-minded U.S. travelers find crowds at major tourist attractions to be more stressful than doing a tax return, while 47 percent don't like to be labeled as tourists when they go to a new place. With that in mind, Airbnb CMO Jonathan Mildenhall said he wanted the brand's latest work to push back against the modern tourism industry and capture the idea that people shouldn't simply go to a new place, they should live there, even if only for one night

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What’s Causing Vice’s Huge Fluctuations in Web Traffic?

April 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ever since Vice decided to get into the cable TV game, the self-assured digital news and lifestyle publisher has been under the microscope. That came blaringly to the fore last month when Variety reported that Vice's web traffic plunged in February. But after free-falling 17.4 percent, from 59.5 million unique visitors in January to 49.2 in February, Vice rebounded nearly all the way back in March, drawing 58.3 million uniques. So what caused Vice's huge fall—and subsequent Phoenix-like rise—the past two months? Ironically, it was smaller sites that Vice bundles with its own traffic in an effort to boost its overall numbers for sales purposes.

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How 4 Multichannel Networks Plan to Attract Millennial Viewers

April 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

By now, it's a given that millennials—some of them having cut the cord, others never having had a cord to cut—are consuming an unprecedented crush of video content on a growing array of platforms and devices. And while appointment viewing is largely a thing of the past, it is also accepted that the bond that audiences, notably younger ones, have forged with content creators found on YouTube, Vine, Instagram and beyond is infinitely more unbreakable than their parents' affinity for the likes of, say, Jerry Seinfeld or the cast of Melrose Place or any other TV star from the past you'd care to name. Multichannel networks, built on the power and reach of YouTube and serving as a bridge between creators and brands craving to reach this base of young, hard-core fans, now constitute a 5-year-old ecosystem, one that finds itself all grown-up and yet as always remains in search of the latest, greatest ways to produce and distribute high-quality content—and of course, the next big video star. And their appeal goes way beyond the screen. Take Twaimz , one of the creators for network Fullscreen. Not only do his videos log millions of views, but his recent tour of the U.S. sold out 22 dates, says Fullscreen founder and CEO George Strompolos. "Why is this happening?" he asks. "He has caught the hearts and minds of an audience." On the eve of the annual Digital Content NewFronts where the freshest programming ideas will get pitched and some $3 billion in ad business will be up for grabs, Adweek caught up with Strompolos and top executives from Maker Studios , Defy Media and Studio71 (formerly Collective Digital Studio) to learn about the issues they face as they chase coveted millennial consumers and talent, and all those advertiser dollars. What would you say is the biggest issue you face heading into the NewFronts? George Strompolos: [Millennials] are watching less and less TV every year, but that doesn't mean that they're not consuming entertainment. If you're an advertiser that's used to spending all this money to reach customers and sell products, you're kind of scratching your head and saying, "Where do I belong?" It's our job to translate that and make it easier for a marketer to reach a customer in those new ways

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Launching a Subscription Service of Its Own, Fullscreen Joins a Crowded Streaming Market

March 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The past half decade has seen the rise of the multichannel network, where thousands of creators produce hundreds of hours of content to satisfy millions of subscribers. They are video collectives built on the back of the free service YouTube. But as such networks grow up, they are realizing "free" (or ad-supported only) content won't pay the bills. Defy Media, AOL and YouTube have recently launched paid services. The newest entrant is Fullscreen, the 5-year-old brainchild of YouTube veteran George Strompolos, who's hoping that among his 600 million subscribers, there are enough superfans willing to pay $5 a month for premium content with no ads. And Strompolos knows just who to target. "We're very specifically going after the teen and young audience that grew up in the social and mobile-first environment," Strompolos said. Fullscreen is not looking to compete with big-time SVOD services like Netflix and Hulu. Instead, Strompolos is looking to monetize younger viewers—the 13-30 set—who are already watching. Fullscreen's subscription service, called fullscreen, launches April 26 and will cost $4.99 per month, cheaper than YouTube Red ($10 per month) and more in line with NBCU's Seeso ($3.99) and Defy Media's Screenjunkies Plus ($4.99). It will be available on iPhone, iPad, some Android devices and Chromecast. So, what sets Fullscreen's subscription service apart from the others? Strompolos says it's all about community. "[Other services] do a really good job of giving you content," he said, "but they haven't necessarily succeeded in creating an environment where people discuss content." Strompolos wants the service to feel more like a hangout where subscribers chat about the content and become creators themselves. "They can make GIFs and riff off the content, really create the foundation for a community," he said. The service will feature a mix of original content from Fullscreen creators and licensed content. The originals are anchored by Grace Helbig and Hannah Hart's revival of Sid and Marty Krofft's 1970s TV series, Electra Woman and Dyna Girl; Paul Scheer and Jonathan Stern's Filthy Preppy Teen$; and Jack & Dean of All Trades

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Viceland Launches VR Partnership With Samsung and Downplays Weak Early TV Ratings Data

March 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As it nears its one-month anniversary, Viceland is expanding its stable of advertising partners by striking a new virtual reality deal with Samsung. But the network is also downplaying early ratings data that indicates soft initial audience interest in the cable network that replaced H2. Viceland and Samsung unveiled a major partnership today to create new virtual reality content for both companies' platforms. The companies are enlisting big names in film, music and gaming to create VR projects for Samsung Milk VR, Samsung's virtual reality content service which is exclusive to the SamsungGear VR headset. The first one will focus on VR pioneer Chris Milk (founder and CEO of Vrse) and highlight his work in the VR space. The partnership launches with this two-minute spot, which will air tonight on Viceland. As part of the partnership, Viceland and Samsung will co-produce a documentary series about the VR creators as they work on these projects. They will premiere as native ads on Viceland prime-time programming, while 30-second versions of each documentary will run during Viceland commercial breaks. "We want to pioneer storytelling 'beyond the frame' and to connect with audiences in completely new, and emotional, ways," said Eddy Moretti, Vice's chief creative officer and Viceland's co-president, in a statement about the new efforts. The new partnership is part of Viceland's efforts to shake up TV advertising by reducing ad load and running more native ads . Viceland hopes to have native ads—which are created by Vice Media to look more like editorial content—represent half its ad inventory within the year. "Vice has always been more successful when it's done native advertising and interesting custom partnerships with brands, and then you extend that idea to this TV network also," said Guy Slattery, general manager for Viceland, told Adweek earlier this month. Early ratings woes? The announcement comes three days after an International Business Times report said ratings had plummeted since Viceland replaced H2 on Feb. 29. According to the story, which cited data from Rentrak, Viceland's average daily viewership over its first three weeks (55,000) is 77 percent lower than H2's numbers during its final three weeks (241,000). A Viceland spokesman said that Rentrak data was "inaccurate," noting that it doesn't focus on the 18-34 demo that Viceland is targeting, which is much younger than the 25-54 demo that had tuned in for H2.

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How Millennials Consume TV Depends on Which Stage of Life They’re In

March 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There's a reason that millennials are so hard for advertisers to pin down: Their media consumption is in constant flux, given that adults in that 18-34 demo are in "rapid transition." That's according to Nielsen's Q4 2015 Total Audience Report, released this morning, which delved into the media consumption habits of advertising's most elusive, and often mystifying, demographic. The report found millennials who have started a family spend significantly more time watching TV—an average of an hour per day more than those who don't have children or still live with their parents. "It's not about age, it's about life stage," wrote Glenn Enoch, evp, audience insights for Nielsen, in the report. "18-34 year olds are not a monolithic group with a common set of technologies or behaviors. Their lives are in rapid transition as they join the workforce, move into their own homes and start families." The Total Audience Report, which is not to be confused with the Total Audience Measurement ratings that Nielsen is rolling, broke millennials into three separate life stage groups: Dependent Adults (those who are living in someone else's home, usually a parent or parents), On Their Own (those who are living in their own home, with no children) and Starting a Family (those living in their own home, with children). For example, 97 percent of 18-year-olds live in someone's else home, usually a parent or parents. But 90 percent of 34-year-olds live in their own home, while 60 percent of those have children. In the middle of the demo, roughly one-third of 26- and 27-year-olds falls into each of the three life stages. Those three groups had very different media preferences during Q4 2015: Nielsen The On Their Own group is more likely than any other millennial group to have a multimedia device, high-speed internet and laptops, as well as access to an SVOD service like Netflix, Hulu or Amazon. Seventy-eight percent of On Their Own Millennials have subscription video on demand (SVOD) services like Netflix and Hulu, compared to 64 percent of Dependent Adults and 58 percent of Staring a Family. On Their Owns spent more than 94 hours using PCs, tablets and smartphones in November 2015, which was around 10 more hours than all 18-34 adults that month and 18 more hours than Dependent Adults. Starting a Family millennials are more likely to own DVRs (47 percent), DVD players (69 percent) and tablets (65 percent). That group also spends the most time at home of the three groups, and not surprisingly, it watches the most live TV (3:16 per day, in hours: minutes) and also has the most total TV screen use (4:40). The average 18-34 person spent 2:45 watching live TV each day in Q4 2015, and another 1:23 using TV-connected devices, for a total of 4:08 of TV time each day. The Starting a Family group spent 3:16 a day watching live TV, an hour more than On Their Owns (2:06), while Dependent Adults watch less live TV (2:32) and spend less time with TV overall (3:44). On Their Owns have the lowest ownership of traditional sources of video and spend the most time outside the home.

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FilMart: Media Asia Strikes Output Deal With China’s iQIYI

March 17, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Chinese streaming giant iQIYI to co-produce and invest in Media Asia film slate.

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