Posts Tagged ‘media’

Q&A: Malcolm Gladwell on Podcasting, Beer Ads and His Next Move

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Since history is written by the victor, it needs a top-notch editor. And that's exactly why best-selling author and New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell rolled out Revisionist History , a podcast in partnership with Slate's Panoply Media. The 10-episode series that debuted in June aims to shift the lens on events ranging from stolen art to a car manufacturer's fiasco to the American educational system in a bid to poke holes in the way we think about the past and present. With Gladwell at the helm, the podcast was an instant success, reaching the top spot on iTunes even before the first episode aired. As Gladwell prepares for the second season of Revisionist History, we caught up with him in his West Village home to talk about the power of audio, advertising and what's next. Adweek: Why is a podcast the best medium for the types of stories that you want to tell? Malcolm Gladwell: It's so different from writing books. You can tell a different kind of story, and when you can hear people's voices, you can recreate scenes and emotions and all those kinds of things so much more keenly and powerfully. And there's a wonderful directness to the podcasts—that I can do it and put it up online and I can reach all my listeners. There's an immediacy to it that's incredibly appealing. More young people are starting podcasts rather than blogs these days, and it's the fastest growing form of media. What's your take on this? I think you've seen three forms—the printed word, audio and video—you've seen existing conventional institutions being challenged by, essentially, young people working as part of small groups or on their own. The new technologies allow small players to compete in those three worlds. And it's been happening in film for a while now and video. Blogs were the beginnings of that happening in printed form.

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Viceland Suffers From Low Ratings Despite Its Young Audience

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Viceland launched in February, the network struck an agreement with Nielsen to keep its ratings private for six months. Shortly before that window is set to lapse, the first look at those Nielsen ratings are out, revealing that while the audience is a lot younger than that of the channel it replaced, H2, it's also a lot smaller. Viceland's average 18-49 prime-time audience in July was just 45,000, less than half of the 92,000 that H2 averaged in the demo last July, according to Nielsen ratings obtained by The Wall Street Journal . The deal that Viceland, a partnership between Vice and A+E Networks, struck with Nielsen is a common arrangement for many new networks as they try to get their bearings in the first months after launching. Nielsen will still not be publicly releasing Viceland's ratings for at least another week as part of that deal. While Viceland's audience is much smaller than H2's, it's also younger. The median viewer age dropped 17 years between July 2015 and July 2016, from 57 to 40. And Nielsen data found that the average 18-49 prime-time audience for the network's July premieres was up significantly, from 59,000 for H2 to 102,000 for Viceland. Depsite the premiere spin, those 18-49 ratings seem disappointing, especially given the buzz around Viceland. However, A+E Networks president and CEO Nancy Dubuc said she is taking a long-term view. "You have to look at what is the promise of H2 10 years from now, versus what is the promise of Viceland 10 years from now," Dubuc told the Journal. Viceland looked to shake up TV advertising by running more native ads that look like editorial and reducing ad load. The network's programming has just eight minutes of national ad time per hour and two minutes of local time. Shortly after the network launched, execs were already trying to downplay linear ratings expectations. Guy Slattery, general manager for Viceland, told Adweek in March that Viceland content is available on the website, app and VOD in addition to the linear networks, but Nielsen's numbers only reflect its linear ratings. "It's an important metric, but it only captures one piece of the multiplatform approach that we have," Slattery said. "So we didn't want to make it all about that. The headlines tend to go to Nielsen ratings, and we don't feel they're going to capture the viewing of this network, particularly among the demo that we're going after

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Here’s How Olympic Advertisers Are Divvying Up Spend Across Digital and TV

August 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

According to data from MediaRadar, 482 advertisers have run TV ads during the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, with 349 of those brands also running digital display advertising. MediaRadar used data from NBC and aggregated stats from 6,000 websites to crunch numbers from Aug. 1 through Aug. 15. For digital ad buys, the company measures factors like ad type, location, density on the page, media format and frequency to create a metric dubbed a Digital Placement Score. The metric is intended to help compare spend across differing ad sizes and shapes that individual websites and publishers often offer. Video and native ad campaigns, for example, score higher than standard display or banner campaigns. In terms of quantity, DirecTV leads with a total of 19 digital and TV campaigns, with a big chunk of digital dollars supporting the DirecTV NFL Sunday Ticket streaming initiative. The media buy for DirecTV NFL Sunday Ticket includes ads on 30 websites—giving the brand a score of 4,315—while another ad buy for a separate campaign across 45 websites yielded a score of 1,495

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MediaCom Names Deutsch Veteran as Its New Chief Strategy Officer

July 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

MediaCom has hired Anush Prabhu, a longtime veteran of the Deutsch organization, as its new managing partner and chief strategy officer in New York. In 2015, Prabhu appeared on both Adweek's Young Influentials list and its Media All-Stars list . In the new role, he will join the WPP agency's executive management board reporting directly to MediaCom USA CEO Sasha Savic. "Anush brings a valuable combination of media expertise, data chops and analytics experience, coupled with a true sense of how creative and communications can positively impact consumer beliefs and behaviors," said Savic. "His professional DNA is a perfect match for our positioning as The Content + Connections Agency." Before joining MediaCom, Prabhu served as partner, chief channel planning and investment officer at the New York offices of Deutsch. This period marked his second stint with the IPG agency, which he joined as an assistant account executive in 2000 before working his way up to the vp, director of CRM strategy position. He left in 2007 and subsequently held top planning and communications roles at JWT and mcgarrybowen before returning to Deutsch in 2012. Throughout his career, he has worked with a variety of clients including J&J, United Healthcare, Sherwin-Williams, Microsoft and Verizon. "The media agency of the future must be able to navigate and develop client-centric solutions at the intersection of creativity, data and technology," said Prabhu in a statement. "This belief drove my decision to join MediaCom, one of the best, most original and most passionately committed agencies in the world.

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Chobani Tells Inspiring Team USA Stories in Its Multifaceted Olympics Campaign

July 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Olympic athletes need to put good stuff into their bodies in order to succeed. But good food alone won't win them any medals at this summer's games in Rio, according to Chobani's new multifaceted Olympics campaign in which athletes need to eliminate all the bad stuff in order to win. Stemming from the idea that Chobani helps power Olympic athletes with its all-natural products and a belief on the part of the brand's founder that "you can only be great if you're full of goodness," Chobani has launched a huge Olympics push, including TV spots, newly designed packaging, social components and more. The campaign, centered around the slogan "No Bad Stuff," stars a diverse crew of Team USA hopefuls including soccer star Alex Morgan, decathlete Ashton Eaton, boxer Marlen Esparza, paratriathlon competitor Melissa Stockwell and wrestler Jordan Burroughs, among others. The five athletes star in a larger anthem spot as well as shorter 30- and 15-second spots, created in partnership with agency Opperman Weiss, all meant to showcase how Chobani and the athletes don't allow bad things in their products, bodies or lives. "In order for these athletes to really reach their ultimate place of greatness it's not only that they can't let shitty food get into their body—they can't eat sugars and preservatives and chemicals and all that stuff—but they also can't allow negativity into their being and spirit, whether that's racism or hatred or jealousy or pride, all of those things that are blocks to greatness to athleticism," Jeff Weiss, Opperman Weiss co-founder, told Adweek. Chobani carefully selected the athletes featured in the campaign, spending roughly four months finding a diverse group of competitors that not only have the potential to win medals but have also overcome adversity to get to the level they're at today. But beyond selecting athletes with a chance to medal for Team USA in Rio, Chobani also wanted to work with athletes who love its product and consume it regularly, and also "have very strong values, beliefs and work ethics [and are] wonderful community citizens," Peter McGuinness, chief marketing and brand officer at Chobani, told Adweek. In the 30-second spots, Chobani dives deeper into individual athletes' stories, showing consumers how each one overcame adversity—Morgan's coach telling her, at the age of 13, that she would never be a great soccer player, for instance, or Esparza proving that women can kick butt in the boxing ring. Each athlete's story is, of course, inspiring. But perhaps most inspiring of the 30-second spots is Stockwell's

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Why Big Brands Are Suddenly Getting Cozy With Reddit

June 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just six months ago, Reddit—whose famous slogan is "The front page of the internet"—was a dangerous place for marketers because of its reputation as a pool of trolling and harassment. Now, the viral-minded site is trying to flip the narrative and draw in advertisers with new ad targeting and buying technology and an in-house studio that specializes in creating custom content. And heavy-hitter brands including Coca-Cola, eBay and Procter & Gamble have all come on board in recent months. "What makes Reddit distinct from an advertising perspective are the same qualities that make it distinct in organic spaces," explained Zubair Jandali, vp of sales at Reddit. "We have 70,000 active communities—few places on the web have audiences that are as passionate as ours." Data backs up Jandali's claim. The publisher's traffic hit 51.4 million monthly users in May, up from 28.4 million a year before, according to comScore. It's the kind of stat that seemingly flies in the face of accusations that Reddit's audience is too niche—and sometimes too cruel—for brands to take seriously. But the goal is simple: capitalize on the massive momentum around native advertising with a specialized team to create content, much like the in-house agencies that have made big-name publishers including The New York Times, The Atlantic and Vox Media leaders in the space

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How Advertising on Different Types of Media Affects Sales of Consumer Packaged Goods

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The increase in sales that consumer packaged goods brands can expect as a result of ad campaigns varies widely by the media platform used to distribute those ads, according to a new study presented today by Nielsen Catalina Solutions at the Advertising Research Foundation's Audience Measurement 2016 conference in New York. To determine how spending on media directly affects sales, Nielsen analyzed more than 1,400 campaigns from 450 CPG brands in seven categories (baby, pet, health and beauty, general merchandise, food, beverage, and over-the-counter products) over 11 years and compared that with in-store purchase data. To determine which advertising platforms drove incremental sales, NCS isolated households that had been exposed to certain types of media—TV, online display, video, mobile, cross-platform and magazines—and compared their buying habits with those of unexposed households. The study found that magazines showed the highest return on advertising spend (ROAS) across all CPG categories, with an average return of $3.94 for every ad dollar spent. Display ads followed with an ROAS of $2.63. Digital video had the lowest ROAS at just $1.53. It was a different story, however, when the incremental sales driven by each media platform were compared with other audience metrics, including the number of households exposed to that platform and the number of impressions the campaign created. Nielsen found that TV drove the highest incremental sales per exposed household ($0.33), while display drove the lowest ($0.19). Mobile advertising resulted in the most sales per 1,000 impressions (an additional $26.52), while display ads resulted in the least ($16.96). Nielsen also studied the data for specific CPG categories, determining that baby products had the highest ROAS across all types of media, while over-the-counter had the lowest. Broken down by media platform, display advertising drove the highest ROAS for baby products, pet products and beverages, while magazine ads garnered the highest ROAS for food, general merchandise, health and beauty, and over-the-counter products.

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Publisher Reach on Facebook Is Down 42%

June 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers who have noticed their overall reach on Facebook has dramatically declined over the past few months can at least have peace of mind that they're not alone. According to an analysis by SocialFlow, publishers on Facebook have experienced a rapid decline in overall reach during the past few months. The social analytics company examined 3,000 Facebook pages, most of which are publishers who have a collective annual impression count of around 500 billion reaching 600 million unique users. And what it found might be a bit depressing to all the hard working journalists of the world: In May, publishers produced around 550,000 posts that went through SocialFlow's platform—up from 470,000 in April—but overall reach from January to May was down 42 percent per post. That's a "pretty notable drop," said SocialFlow CEO Jim Anderson. "We said, wait a minute, if the reach is staying flat but the posts are going up, the only possible conclusion there is that my reach per post is going down," he said in an interview.

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3 Surprising Lessons a Major Nonprofit Learned When It Analyzed Its Advertising

June 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nonprofits rarely have the luxury of big advertising budgets, and it's not often they get a chance to analyze whether their ads are working. But a new study may help shed some light on the kinds of ads that actually help drive donations. Market research firm Millward Brown and the Ad Council recently set out to study the impact of a PSA campaign for Goodwill. The Ad Council, which relies on donated time and space from media partners, received more than $94 million in donated support for the Goodwill campaign, running from September 2013 to April 2015 and resulting in 363 million pounds of donations. The research wanted to determine whether changing the nonprofit's mix of TV, digital, print and radio advertising could increase donations, said Ellyn Fisher, svp of public relations and social media at the Ad Council. With such valuable data, Goodwill could make sure it was focusing on the right kinds of ads in future campaigns

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These 5 Great Campaigns Won Black and White Pencils at 2016 D&AD

May 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two Black Pencils, three White Pencils and 61 Yellow Pencils were handed out Thursday night in London at the 54th D&AD Professional Awards Ceremony. Winning an ultra-exclusive Black Pencil were U.K. technology startup what3words for "The World Addressed," a campaign to gives every 3-by-3-meter square in the world an address; and Japanese design firm iyamadesign for its spatial design of the "mt expo 2015" on behalf of masking tape brand Kamoi Kakoshi. See videos about those campaigns here: Adweek responsive video player used on /video. Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

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