Posts Tagged ‘media’

Unruly’s 2017 Predictions on Changing Media Consumption Behaviors

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January 9, 2017  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Here’s what you need know. In 2017, media consumption behaviors will only continue to change as emerging technology continues to evolve - staying on the cutting edge of these consumer behaviors is a big task! Unruly, a digital video distribution agency with a focus on emotional intelligence, has released their social and digital consumption predictions for 2017. Unruly’s managing director Oliver Smith will will be a featured speaker at our upcoming Engage: LA conference. The  report covers the following: Augmented reality has the scale but VR will have deeper impact. Vertical creatives will be the rule rather than the exception in 2017. Audio will have

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Tinder Is Reminding CES Attendees That Real-Life Love Beats Virtual Reality

January 6, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While Consumer Electronics Show attendees scope out the hottest virtual reality at the Las Vegas Convention Center this week, Tinder is promoting another kind of VR—very real. In a video released on Thursday, it seemed for a second like maybe the dating app was launching some sort of virtual reality experience. (After all, VR has been touted time and time again as an empathy machine , and what romance-seeker couldn't use a little more of that?) "We're always looking for new ways to bring people together," the narrator says quietly, as more and more of the product is revealed. "Not in feeds or comment sections. Real together. Shared experience.

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Impact Marketing in Today’s Political Climate

Do Good Better 2017
January 2, 2017  |  Blog  |  No Comments

In today’s global climate, smart marketing strategies are ones that can help solve some of the world’s biggest problems. With this challenge, we all know that behavioral change and scale are key. Here’s what a few of our Do Good Better 2017 speakers and impact marketing innovators have done to not only expand bottom lines and further their business’s profile but to increase customer loyalty, build goodwill all while actually changing the world and solving some tough problems. Jay Curley, Senior Marketing Manager for Ben & Jerry’s: Jay Curley is the Senior Global Marketing Manager for Ben & Jerry’s. Jay leads the development

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Media Consumption in the Age of Fake News

Media Consumption in the Age of Fake News

Bogus Fake News
December 12, 2016  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Fake news has been in the real news a lot lately. It’s a multifaceted conversation with many sides to the argument. In a clickbait economy, how do we focus on honest reporting without censoring or suppressing voices? How are Google and Facebook’s crackdowns on fake news outlets going to affect digital advertisers? We rounded up the stories you need to read to be fully in the know as this conversation will ultimately shape the way digital media is created, distributed and marketed. What if fake news affects your business? Huffington Post has your reputational clean-up game plan here. Will fake news have

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How Ashley Madison Became So Attractive to Subscribers Again

November 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

These days, Ashley Madison doesn't have to cheat to get ahead. So says Rob Segal, who has worked hard to refocus the site's image and rescue its reputation since April, when he left WorldGaming to join Ashley Madison's parent company, Ruby Corp. (formerly Avid Life Media), as CEO. Launched 15 years ago, Ashley Madison became famous (some would say infamous) as the go-to online resource for users (mostly men) seeking partners (mainly women) for affairs. Disaster struck in July 2015, when a breach of its database exposed the identities and information of some 32 millions users, tarnishing the brand's "good" name. Plus, Ashley Madison itself had been cheating: many of the "women" on the service were in fact bots deployed by its sales force to deceive men. Some doubted Ashley Madison would survive, but ownership banished the bots and shored up security to thwart future data hacks. (The site implemented more discrete credit card processing and stricter monitoring procedures.) And the board hired Segal, 49, a marketer by trade, who launched a big push to reposition the service as a lifestyle brand and social network for folks open to exploring aspects of human sexuality, from swinging and group sex to BDSM.

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Presenting the Hot List—the Year’s Top Magazines, TV and Digital Media

November 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It was the year that Donald Trump dominated and demonized the media. That magazines built around news and analysis (New York, The New Yorker, Time) made the greatest impact, and produced the most eye-catching covers. That The People v. O.J. Simpson, Stranger Things and Samantha Bee ruled the tube—and that Megyn Kelly found herself on both sides of the news. This was also the year that digital platforms, players, obsessions and innovations—from Snapchat to Pokemon Go to Facebook Live, DJ Khaled to Chrissy Teigen—commanded our attention. Here, we present Adweek's annual Hot List, featuring our editors' picks for the year's top magazines, television and digital media, and the executives and content creators who dictate where the business is and where it's headed. Take Amazon's Jeff Bezos, our 2016 Media Visionary, who not only has changed the way we shop but, via his ownership of The Washington Post, is helping to save journalism in a perilous time of real-vs.-fake news. Here, we also present the winners of our annual Hot List Readers' Choice Poll, which this year generated more than 1.2 million votes at Adweek.com. As ever, all the terrific content being produced out there is made possible by the smartest, most creative leaders in the business—aside from Bezos, individuals like Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, FX's John Landgraf, and Hearst's David Carey and Michael Clinton. It is on them that we cast praise, and on them that a vibrant, forward-leaning media industry depends. Check out all this year's honorees: Hottest Magazines Media Visionary: Jeff Bezos Magazine Executive Team: Hearst's David Carey and Michael Clinton Magazine Editor: New York's Adam Moss Hottest TV Shows and Networks TV Executive: FX's John Landgraf TV Creator: Full Frontal's Samantha Bee TV News Anchor: Fox News' Megyn Kelly Hottest Digital Brands and Products Digital Executive: Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg Digital Creator: Casey Neistat This story first appeared in the November 28, 2016 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.

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2 Students Turned November Into Brandsgiving With These Incredible Mockups

November 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do you show brands you're grateful for them? If you're Cat DeLong and Micah Wilkes, creative directors for the Brigham Young University AdLab, a student-run, professionally-mentored ad agency, you spend November producing creative for 30 brands. Their project, Brandsgiving, is simple: Pick 30 brands you love, then each day randomly select one and spend an hour developing art and copy that conveys its message. Drawing inspiration from Communication Arts magazine and Brent Anderson, creative director of TBWA/Chiat Day Media Arts Lab, the pair wanted to create visual expressions for brands representing a variety of industries and styles. The project would improve their abilities to generate and produce work at a clip that's standard for a professional in the industry. As for how they split the work—DeLong is the copywriter of the duo while Wilkes, who has a passion for typography, design and illustration, does the design for each piece. The team is especially proud of the work it did for Jif and Delta (see below), as well as TruMoo. "We felt they were on brand, but coming at their brand from a totally different angle," they said. "It would have been really easy to create a whole campaign for them because they were strategically smart." They plan on submitting their favorites to Comm Arts and other brief shows, as well as using them in portfolios for competitions like One Show to vie for a coveted Pencil award. With graduation right around the corner, they've attended Advertising Week in New York and have a trip planned to Los Angeles in December to meet with various agencies. "I think we were especially fond of Wieden+Kennedy New York, Droga5 and McCann Erickson New York," DeLong said.

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How Data Can Fuel Improved Relationships Between Marketers and Agencies

October 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How essential is data in any marketer's relationship with an agency? According to a new study from the Association of National Advertisers, data plays a key part of that relationship, with 80 percent of marketers indicating they use data "often or always" when handling partnerships with agencies. The ANA conducted its latest survey, "Using Data to Manage Agency Relationships: What's Important to Marketers," with help from Decideware. Polling 92 client-side marketers, the survey found that 82 percent of marketers said data improved the overall client/agency relationship, while 90 perfect felt it improved their agency's efficiencies. "Data helps build better relationships between the client and agency, helping both parties focus on outcomes. And at a time where there are transparency issues in the industry, the use of data enhances trust," ANA Group evp Bill Duggan said in a statement. One area where data is most useful for marketers is managing media and budgets, but is typically least useful on the creative and production side. With these findings, the ANA created a set of implications or guidelines for using data that marketers and agencies should think about in the future. When it comes to media, data is key, especially now that transparency is a major issue for clients. Based on the findings, the ANA suggests that advertisers "assume greater internal stewardship of their media investments," and that they "set up metrics to track performance." When it comes to creative, the ANA suggests that clients should be paying more attention to how data can help track "the number of rounds of revision that work undergoes prior to final approval, the average length of time that each approval step takes and even 'soft' metrics like the quality of the brief." The impact of that data may allow the client to potentially reduce agency fees and speed up work flow

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Donald Trump’s Lack of Ad Spending Is Leaving a Hole In Local Media’s Pocket

October 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The presidential debates provided plenty of free airtime. Gif: Dianna McDougall; Sources: CNN, Shutterstock The presidential election has been momentous and memorable: the first woman nominee of a major party, a businessman/reality show candidate, leaked emails, bigly, Ken Bone and Billy Bush. But local media will remember the 2016 race for what it didn't provide: significant ad revenue. Media forecasting firm Magna originally projected this year's political ad spend to be 15 percent above 2012, which would have set a new record. But current forecasts put the ad buy in line with the 2012 campaign. "[Donald Trump] is not nearly spending what Mitt Romney or John McCain's campaigns did eight years ago," said Mark Fratrik, svp and chief economist for BIA Kelsey. "That disappointed the outlooks of local media companies." Local TV ad sales were underwhelming despite a 10 percent increase this year. "Good, but it fell below our anticipations," added Vincent Letang, evp of global market intelligence for Magna. Around $2.8 billion was booked in local political TV ad sales this year, up 3 percent from 2012 dollars. It's particularly not impressive because a total of $20 billion was spent on local TV ads overall, excluding political ads. "When Trump was a candidate in the primaries, he spent very little," said Letang. "We thought once he got the nomination and gained more access to GOP fundraising, he'd spend closer to what Romney did during his general election [of 2012]. That didn't happen." But it's not just Trump's underwhelming spend that surprises analysts. "We all thought Virginia would continue to be a battleground state for the campaigns. But it just isn't

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How Jeff Bezos Is Turning the Washington Post Into a Digitally Driven Publisher

October 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

SAN FRANCISCO—When Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos took over the Washington Post in 2013, many wondered what a tech exec's leadership would look like at a 140-year-old newspaper. But with a growing digital business and new practices in the newsroom, the Washington Post's executive editor, Martin Baron, talked about how the paper approaches its deep reporting—like having 20 reporters cover this year's presidential election—during a panel at Vanity Fair's New Establishment Summit. "Jeff came in not only with financial power, but he came in with intellectual power and I think forced us to think more profoundly about how the internet changed the way that we deliver information to people," Barron said during an interview with Vanity Fair's special correspondent Sarah Ellison. Baron said the paper talks to Bezos once every two weeks for about an hour, and one of the first things he did after buying the paper was getting the newsroom to think differently about aggregation and curation. "One of the first things he talked to us about is, 'Look, you do these big, narrative stories. You do these deep investigations, and then some other media outlet in 15 minutes [has] rewritten your story, and they've grabbed your traffic. How are you going to think about that?' That's a hard question to answer," Baron said. That conversation left Baron with the impression that Bezos' ownership "will not allow us to do the deep, narrative stories—but that's not what happened." Instead, the paper started aggregating itself with staff members looking for parts of stories they could pick out and compile into one story. The publisher has also started aggregating from other news outlets.

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