Posts Tagged ‘marketing’

10 Brands That Changed the World [Video]

November 20, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Read More

The Legendary George Lois Works With His Son and Grandson

November 14, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Read More

Comedy Central Is Dismantling Its Digital Wall

October 14, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Can a network merge its digital unit with the rest of the corporate structure? Comedy Central thinks it can—today, the network is announcing it’s done exactly that. The next question, of course, is how the agency and client worlds will react. “We basically dismantled the department formerly known as digital,” said Michele Ganeless, president of the network. “We had a digital team that made digital content and digital marketing and scheduled the digital platforms, and then ... we realized that our audience doesn’t think of it that way. And we shouldn’t, either.” Accordingly, David Bernath is now evp, programming and multiplatform strategy, and Walter Levitt is now CMO. (Kent Alterman became president, content development and original programming earlier this year.) Across the network, among employees who manned Twitter feeds or posted fan art to Facebook accounts, Ganeless said, “Everyone who was speaking directly to our viewers now works in marketing.” But how does all this work with an agency world that is still to some extent siloed into digital and linear groups? Gibbs Haljun, managing director, media investment at GroupM, says it should work pretty well given that most agencies are already requiring their digital and linear divisions to work closely. “Everybody, regardless of whether the groups are separate or not, has to work closely together,” said Haljun. “You’re going to have video that lives on three different plans. It’s going to live on print in my iPad editions, it’s going to live on TV, and it’s going to live on digital video.” Naturally, it behooves a network that targets the 18-34 demo keep up with the times. Nielsen decided back in February to redefine what constituted a TV watching household and began including connected TV viewing

Read More

Comedy Central Is Dismantling Its Digital Wall

October 14, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Can a network merge its digital unit with the rest of the corporate structure? Comedy Central thinks it can—today, the network is announcing it’s done exactly that. The next question, of course, is how the agency and client worlds will react. “We basically dismantled the department formerly known as digital,” said Michele Ganeless, president of the network. “We had a digital team that made digital content and digital marketing and scheduled the digital platforms, and then ... we realized that our audience doesn’t think of it that way.

Read More

New AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Talks About Where the Online Ad Market Is Headed (Video)

September 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Lauren Goode/ATD AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Earlier this week, Bob Lord, the new CEO of its AOL Networks, sat down at AllThingsD global HQ for a chat with me about his new job. A well-regarded industry veteran who was most recently global CEO of Razorfish and CEO of Publicis Groupe’s digital technologies division, he is now in charge of the suite of marketing and advertising services and technologies at the New York company. The job is largely centered on selling premium display, video and mobile network ads for the Web portal via its automated technology systems. As I noted when Lord was hired at the end of August , “AOL is hoping to use tech means to boost its business, but results have been harder to realize. While revenue rose in the recent quarter, profits declined. Lord is a good choice to help push AOL forward, with much ad tech experience over the years, especially at Razorfish.” Here he is talking about all that and more, including a book he recently co-authored, titled “Converge: Transforming Business at the Intersection of Marketing and Technology,” in a video interview: [ See post to watch video ]

Read More

New AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Talks About Where the Online Ad Market Is Headed (Video)

September 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Lauren Goode/ATD AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Earlier this week, Bob Lord, the new CEO of its AOL Networks, sat down at AllThingsD global HQ for a chat with me about his new job. A well-regarded industry veteran who was most recently global CEO of Razorfish and CEO of Publicis Groupe’s digital technologies division, he is now in charge of the suite of marketing and advertising services and technologies at the New York company. The job is largely centered on selling premium display, video and mobile network ads for the Web portal via its automated technology systems. As I noted when Lord was hired at the end of August , “AOL is hoping to use tech means to boost its business, but results have been harder to realize. While revenue rose in the recent quarter, profits declined.

Read More

The Color Purple: Yahoo Tries to Excite Consumers With Month-Long New Logo Reveal

August 7, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

In yet another flashy PR effort under Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, the company’s marketing arm has ginned up an effort to get consumers talking about a new logo it plans on launching in a month and had previously signaled it was working on. While it has apparently already selected a new design, the Silicon Valley Internet giant is going to keep us cooling our heels and will be showing off 30 different logos. There will then be a big September 4 reveal under an effort called, of course, “30 Days of Change.” The first possible — which looks kind of skinny to me to rate — is above. The company has changed its logo since it was founded in the mid-1990s, but not in a dog’s age. While the anticipation is not quite like waiting to see what happened in the recent season finale of “Game of Thrones” — will it be fuchsia or will it be violet or will it be purple is not quite the same as the Red Wedding — we’ll try our best to get all psyched. But, to do so, I am definitely going to need a very big dose of Carly Simon:

Read More

Why Wall Street Should Care About Marketing Data

July 26, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Image copyright leungchopan Today’s CMOs are making major investments to reach their target audiences across dozens of touchpoints — on their own websites, through search, display advertising and email, and increasingly on social channels and mobile devices. The problem is, most of the technology platforms marketers are using to accomplish this don’t talk to each other. What’s more, many of the groups within the organization running these programs are just as siloed. This means that the things marketers learn about customers in one channel often don’t translate into sound strategy decisions for other channels. I’ll give you an example. Today, if someone clicks on a display ad, reaches a landing page and fills out a form, the CRM or marketing automation system can capture that lead and track that it came from display advertising. What marketers can’t yet do is take advantage of the information exchange in the opposite direction. What if they could use the rich information stored in the CRM system — such as how far along a prospect is in the sales pipeline — to make the display ad creative and messaging more relevant? Marketing executives know they need to get their systems and people to talk to each other. In fact, a new study by Accenture Interactive, “ Turbulence for the CMO ,” reveals that 70 percent of top CMOs think they have five years to fundamentally overhaul their companies’ corporate marketing operating model to achieve competitive success. Big marketing technology companies know this too, and it is why companies like Salesforce, Oracle and Google are duking it out to own the customer data and CRM system. They want to be at the center of the value created by unlocking this marketing data and getting at an integrated view of a prospect or customer. Think about how powerful it would be to serve up personalized Web content based on the ads someone has previously been exposed to, events they’ve attended, or when they’ve most recently engaged with a sales rep, or, to easily target email or display ads to just those people who engaged with a social campaign.

Read More

Nearly Everything is Branded at Comic Con

July 18, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Attendees may show up San Diego Comic Con as superheroes, but they turn into advertisements as soon as they walk through the fan-stuffed door and into the too-small convention center. As folks settle in to wait for the doors to open, they awkwardly flirt, adjust their free backpacks—each of which comes with a detachable cape advertising a Warner Brothers property (from The Lego Movie to DC Comics to The Vampire Diaries)—and admire or mock the costumed attendees nearby. The guy who came as Waldo is going to have to put up with people yelling "There he is!" for the whole four-day weekend. Branding opportunities abound. The skirted silhouette on a ladies room door wields a knife and instead of "Women," the Bates Motel-branded sign says, "Normas." Even the free (if extremely spotty) WiFi server is labeled, "Teen Wolf Free WiFi.” "It's all about brands trying to outdo each other," explained Fearless Media's Cara Scharf. Indeed, the brand activations around the convention range from the mundane to the spectacular. Legendary Entertainment, the company behind both "Pacific Rim" and "Man of Steel," has an exhibition that is somewhere between a museum and a ride at Disneyland. The first part of the marketing stunt is an exhibition of memorabilia with all things Godzilla on display. After a few minutes of milling around, an "emergency" forces attendees into another room where giant windows open onto a rainy street being stalked by a monster who peers angrily through the window at lizard-lovers. The fans are then armed with mini-posters and released into the wild. Veterans of the convention are surprisingly uncynical. In fact, plenty of the exhibitors are fans themselves. Take Kevin Shinick, showrunner for Cartoon Network's Mad Magazine and serial Comic Con-goer. “It has gotten to the point now—this is my sixth Con, I think—where they're like family reunions," said Shinick. "There are people you don't see except for once a year." Shinick canvasses the Con for new talent—plenty of young hopefuls bring their portfolios—but he also gets to participate in Cartoon Network's huge presence. It's another Warner Brothers property, and Warners has a dominant status at the convention befitting its control of DC Entertainment, Turner, the Hobbit franchise and sundry other shows out of its television production arm. New movies are being promoted enthusiastically—there's a huge exhibit for The Hobbit that looks like the movie's final setting of the Lonely Mountain, but Marvel and its parent corporation, Disney, aren't exactly lying down on the job, either. You can't walk ten feet without seeing a poster for Thor: The Dark World, and the Con is swarming with folks talking about the ABC's upcoming Agents of SHIELD. But the reason all these expensive activations are here—and there's no way the Godzilla blowout is less than a five-figure investment—is to see what the fans are interested in

Read More
Digitally Delivering Social Good

Digitally Delivering Social Good

Participant Pictures Executive Headshots

Participant Media is the company behind a few notable films that have been released in the past few years, including An Inconvenient Truth, Waiting For Superman, Food Inc, Good Night & Good Luck, Charlie Wilson’s War, Contagion, The Help, and others. TakePart.com serves as Participant Media's digital arm, and is a leading source for delivering the most important issues that shape our lives through socially relevant news, features, opinion, entertainment and information. It is now one of the largest cause-oriented communities online, and much of its success in promoting social good through the internet is due to another guest that will be joining Do Good Better: Innovation in

Read More