Posts Tagged ‘marketing’

Visa Spends at Least a Third of Its Marketing Budget on Digital

February 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Visa is one of the longest-running Olympics sponsors , with 27 years of support behind the games. This year, the marketer is ramping up its use of mobile and social platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Vine, Tumblr and YouTube to connect with consumers and reinforce its new aspirational message, as embodied in the new tagline: “Everywhere you want to be.” Visa CMO Kevin Burke, who has overseen the development of three Olympics programs for the company, spoke with Adweek about why global sports is a good association for Visa and how its use of digital media is changing how Visa tells its brand story. What are you doing differently at the Sochi Winter Games? London 2012 was the tipping point. The games and brands were more social, mobile and digital than ever before, and now the bar is raised even higher. Mobile is at the heart of it for us in terms of delivering content and allowing consumers to engage with it everywhere.

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Mobile Apps Still Feel Risky, But Don’t Let That Stop You

Mobile Apps Still Feel Risky, But Don’t Let That Stop You

mobile-phones
February 10, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Talk NYC is continuing its new contributor series with Vaino Leskinen, Head of Mobile, TBWA's Digital Arts Network LA — 2013 was the year of mobile and 2014 will be one as well. Flurry, a mobile analytics vendor, claims that Americans spend an average of 2 hours and 38 minutes per day on smartphones and tablets. Moreover, Business Insider says mobile accounts for 20% of ecommerce traffic and 11% of ecommerce sales. Mobile has arrived and a huge chunk of the action is in applications.

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Take the Subway in New York? Then you Know Lucas

Take the Subway in New York? Then you Know Lucas

Screen shot 2014-02-08 at 9.07.49 AM
February 9, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Few subway ads have created the uproar that Venmo, a new money exchange app, has in the past few months since rolling out their all-encompassing "Lucas uses Venmo" campaign. If you take the subway, you know what we mean. Besides the wonderfully horrible Dr. Zizmor ads that all New Yorkers have come to love and look for, we can't remember a campaign that has been as polarizing as this one from Venmo.

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Want to Sell Something? Know Thy Audience...

Want to Sell Something? Know Thy Audience…

A group of young adults drinking alcohol from a jug, ca. 1900
February 8, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

In a seemingly innocuous tale about how Irish whisky has had the comeback of spirits comebacks, Esquire lets its readers in on a very important tip for anyone trying to market a brand, product or event: if you want the world to buy what you're selling, you have to know how to talk to your audience.

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Storytelling Needs to Evolve With the Times

Storytelling Needs to Evolve With the Times

Screen shot 2014-02-08 at 8.07.27 AM
February 8, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Do you create content on a daily basis? Then you need to watch this talk from 99u and Gary Vaynerchuk, because there are some hard truths being shared for anyone using social media as a marketing tool.

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Moonshine Leaves the Woods for Store Shelves

February 4, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Despite grumbling from some quarters that the Discovery series Moonshiners —which shines the camera light on the bootleggers of backwoods Appalachia—is a dramatization, one component of the show just got real: Tim Smith, the series’ bibbed-overall-wearing star, has gone into retail. Prost Beverage has inked a deal with Smith to sell his booze under the name Climax. Said Smith in a statement: “My moonshine is legit, and it’s still the real deal.” If Smith sounds defensive, it may be because concessions are inevitable when turning country hootch into a store brand. Climax comes in peach and grape, and its 79 proof is far tamer than the 150 proof stuff that stills often spill. To make the leap, Prost enlisted the aid of brand development agency Beardwood & Co., which designed packaging that manages the competing ends of looking haute and hillbilly at the same time. When it comes to moonshine, “there are a lot of Mason jars, XXXs and jugs with handles,” said Beardwood managing partner Ryan Lynch. “We wanted to tell the true story of Tim’s distilling with authenticity, but no clich

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Marketers Are Pushing Hard to Be Seen at This Year’s Super Bowl

January 27, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Bud Light’s Rob McCarthy huddled with his marketing team in New Orleans on the eve of last year’s Super Bowl

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Viacom’s Branded Content Play Is the Latest Among Cable Giants

January 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Viacom is doing at scale something that TV entertainment companies—especially those with a wide footprint in the unscripted world—are treating like the advertising success of the future: It's creating a full division devoted to branded content. (The Nickelodeon family of kids' networks isn't a part of this—those channels operate under very different advertising rules.) The new group is called Viacom Velocity and will work closely with the marketing divisions of every adult network in the Viacom portfolio, including Comedy Central, MTV, VH1, Spike, TV Land and BET. The original content part of the unit—creative solutions, run by Neils Schuurmans, formerly evp of marketing and exec creative director at Spike—will serve partly as a think tank for new ideas. One example is Comedy Central's recent half-hour prime-time special with Kevin Hart—called Serve & Protect—which led into Hart's new movie with Ice Cube, Ride Along. The other part of the venture will be working with existing talent. Evp Dario Spina will head the integrated marketing half of the equation, working on content that "weaves in and out of our existing programming," as Spina puts it. Both involve a significant amount of production oversight, as well as air traffic control between very different brands. "This is something we've been doing informally for the last few years and it's really reaching a tipping point of scale," said company ad sales head Jeff Lucas, who is also refreshingly frank about why the company is announcing the new unit now: "As we're approaching the upfront, we want to make some noise to get out there and broaden it." Indeed, it's a good time to formalize this setup—throughout television, it's harder every year to sell clients on a purely spot-based buy. Viewers skip ads, they pirate, they wait for the DVD set or the streaming air date, or they buy by episode on digital. But Lucas says this is the way forward. "We've spent years investing in content based on deep research," he told Adweek. "We can get closer to the creators of that content than anyone." (Both Spina and Schuurmans report to Lucas.) Network executives at several companies have been trying to do this on different levels for years—a few years ago at NBCUniversal, Lauren Zalaznick (who left the company late last year) instituted cross-network demo buys for women and Hispanic viewers that forced the sometimes internally competitive NBCU family to play nice together when it came to pleasing ad clients. Ad sales president Linda Yaccarino created a "client solutions group" with similar aims in October. Discovery purchased Revision3 last year in a bid to create more deeply branded properties that aligned with its existing linear networks; thus far its Animalist and Test Tube digital platforms (half-siblings of cable channels Animal Planet and Science) have yielded several sponsorships. And Turner has Funny or Die and a particularly deep client-network setup at Adult Swim—with the exception of reality, comedy content is the easiest to integrate.

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Viacom Is Creating a Full Division Devoted to Branded Content

January 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Viacom is doing at scale something that TV entertainment companies—especially those with a wide footprint in the unscripted world—are relying heavily on for growth: It's creating a full division devoted to branded content. (The Nickelodeon family of kids' networks isn't a part of this—those channels operate under very different advertising rules.) The new group is called Viacom Velocity and will work closely with the marketing divisions of every adult network in the Viacom portfolio, including Comedy Central, MTV, VH1, Spike, TV Land and BET. The original content part of the unit—creative solutions, run by Neils Schuurmans, formerly evp of marketing and exec creative director at Spike—will serve partly as a think tank for new ideas. One example is Comedy Central's recent half-hour prime-time special with Kevin Hart—called Serve & Protect—which led into Hart's new movie with Ice Cube, Ride Along. The other part of the venture will be working with existing talent. Evp Dario Spina will head the integrated marketing half of the equation, working on content that "weaves in and out of our existing programming," as Spina puts it. Both involve a significant amount of production oversight, as well as air traffic control between very different brands. "This is something we've been doing informally for the last few years and it's really reaching a tipping point of scale," said company ad sales head Jeff Lucas, who is also refreshingly frank about why the company is announcing the new unit now: "As we're approaching the upfront, we want to make some noise to get out there and broaden it." Indeed, it's a good time to formalize this setup—throughout television, it's harder every year to sell clients on a purely spot-based buy. Viewers skip ads, they pirate, they wait for the DVD set or the streaming air date, or they buy by episode on digital. But Lucas says this is the way forward. "We've spent years investing in content based on deep research," he told Adweek. "We can get closer to the creators of that content than anyone." (Both Spina and Schuurmans report to Lucas.) Network executives at several companies have been trying to do this on different levels for years—a few years ago at NBCUniversal, Lauren Zalaznick (who left the company late last year) instituted cross-network demo buys for women and Hispanic viewers that forced the sometimes internally competitive NBCU family to play nice together when it came to pleasing ad clients. Ad sales president Linda Yaccarino created a "client solutions group" with similar aims in October. Discovery purchased Revision3 last year in a bid to create more deeply branded properties that aligned with its existing linear networks; thus far its Animalist and Test Tube digital platforms (half-siblings of cable channels Animal Planet and Science) have yielded several sponsorships. And Turner has Funny or Die and a particularly deep client-network setup at Adult Swim—with the exception of reality, comedy content is the easiest to integrate. But Viacom has been doing this sort of thing well and for a long time: Spike, in particular, has been a focal point—it does Dick Clark-style countdowns to the release of new Call of Duty games, and the whole organization united to promote Relativity's raunch-comedy anthology (which is poised to sweep the Razzies this year).

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Oracle Acquires Cloud Marketing Player Responsys for $1.5 Billion

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Marketing software in the cloud is still pretty hot. Software giant Oracle proved it today by saying it will spend $1.5 billion to acquire email marketing company Responsys for $27 a share. The deal works out to a 38 percent premium over Responsys’ closing price on Thursday. The company went public in 2011 at $12 a share. Responsys has been mentioned often as a likely acquisition target since Salesforce.com acquired ExactTarget in June for $2.5 billion. That leaves Constant Contact, another email marketing company, available — its shares rose by more than four percent today in the wake of this deal. And while we’re at it, it’s worth mentioning that shares of Marketo, another cloud-based marketing company, are up by more than nine percent this morning. Oracle said it will combine Responsys with another recent acquisition, Eloqua, which it bought a year ago today for $871 million . The result will be a marketing cloud product that serves both the business-to-business and business-to-consumer ends of the spectrum. The deal will close early in the new year. Here’s Oracle’s original announcement: Oracle Buys Responsys Creates the World’s Largest Modern Marketing Cloud by Adding Leading B2C Marketing Orchestration Platform Redwood Shores, Calif. — December 20, 2013 Oracle today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Responsys, Inc. (NASDAQ: MKTG), the leading provider of enterprise-scale cloud-based B2C marketing software, for $27.00 per share in cash or approximately $1.5 billion, net of Responsys’ cash. Responsys is used by the most respected B2C brands across the globe to orchestrate marketing interactions across email, mobile, social, display and the web, at massive scale. The addition of Responsys extends Oracle’s Customer Experience Cloud, which includes Commerce, Sales, Service, Social and the Oracle Marketing Cloud. By bringing together Responsys and Oracle Eloqua in the Marketing Cloud, for the first time CMOs that support industries with B2C or B2B business models will be equipped to drive exceptional customer experiences across marketing interactions and throughout the customer lifecycle from a single platform. The Board of Directors of Responsys has unanimously approved the transaction.

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