Posts Tagged ‘marketing’

How Iron Maiden Made the Boeing 747 Badass Again

June 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Celebrity endorsements are a cornerstone of advertising nowadays, but an industrial manufacturing giant like Boeing seldom gets the chance to play that game. What celebrity is going to tout stuff like cargo hold capacity and cruising range? Well, Boeing's chance came several weeks ago, when one of its 747-400 jumbo jets touched down at the company's manufacturing plant in Everett, Wash., with Captain Bruce Dickinson at the controls. Dickinson is better known as the frontman for Iron Maiden , the British heavy-metal band that's sold over 90 million records in a career spanning four decades. The 57-year-old Dickinson's talent for soaring applies to more than his voice: Since the 1990s, he's also held a commercial pilot's license. Iron Maiden is currently in the middle of a six-continent, 35-city tour in a chartered 747. And Dickinson is doing all the flying. Iron Maiden vocalist Bruce Dickenson (center, foreground) is also a commercial pilot.

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Michelle Obama: Marketing Can Make America Healthier

June 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

I don't think I ever could have imagined that, as first lady, I would appear in an episode of Billy on the Street to promote fruits and vegetables and would wind up slow dancing with Big Bird in a supermarket while Billy Eichner serenaded us with an Aerosmith song. Michelle Obama Headshot: Alex Fine But then again, six years ago, I don't think any of us could have imagined that Fenway Park would have a 5,000-square-foot farm on its rooftop to provide fresh produce for its fans; or that 50 million Americans would visit a government website called ChooseMyPlate to learn about healthy eating; or that sales of kale would jump 50 percent in just four years; or that 1.6 million kids would be in healthy daycares, eating more than 225 million healthy snacks and meals a year; or that more than 30 million kids would be eating healthier school breakfasts and lunches every day; or that the first unanimously chosen NBA MVP, Steph Curry , would choose fruits, vegetables and water as his primary product endorsements. In 2010, when I first launched Let's Move! —a nationwide effort to address our childhood obesity epidemic and raise a healthier generation—the challenge was so big and entrenched that this kind of transformation in how we live and eat seemed nearly impossible. Nonetheless, we were still determined to make a difference, so we engaged leaders from all sectors—educators, medical professionals, elected officials, parents and even kids themselves—to create public-private partnerships and science-based policy to improve access to healthy food. But we also knew we would need to get kids excited about eating that food and inform and empower parents to purchase and prepare that food for their families. And that meant meeting people where they are with fresh, interactive approaches and relevant, inspiring messages. We started by planting a vegetable garden on the White House lawn with local students to help kick off a national conversation around how we eat and where our food comes from. And since then, we've employed just about every medium imaginable to try to cut through the noise and engage kids and families directly—from Vine Q&As that brought about Turnip for What , to appearing on Disney's Doc McStuffins in cartoon form, to Mom Dancing with Jimmy Fallon (twice). We've also worked to use the power of advertising to our favor, which is no easy task when of the nearly $2 billion spent annually on advertising food to youth, less than 1 percent is spent on marketing fruits and vegetables (which, according to current nutrition guidelines, are supposed to fill half our plate at each meal). But we all know that advertising works, so we figured, why shouldn't fruits and vegetables get in on the action? That's the idea behind Partnership for a Healthier America's iconic FNV marketing campaign for millennials that utilizes celebrities like Steph Curry, Jessica Alba, Cam Newton and dozens of others in smart, funny ads for fruits and vegetables. In just the past year, FNV has drawn 1 billion media impressions, and 70 percent of people who saw the campaign said they ate more produce as a result. The same idea underlies a campaign by the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) called "eat brighter!" through which Sesame Workshop is allowing PMA to use Sesame Street characters, without a licensing fee, to promote fruits and vegetables in 29,000 grocery stores (think Elmo stickers on apples). Thanks to our favorite furry friends, PMA reported an increase in fruit and vegetable sales among campaign participants nationwide. Once we got people excited about healthy eating, we knew we would also have to improve how nutrition information is communicated to help folks actually buy and serve those healthy foods to their families. That's why we launched MyPlate —an icon that replaced the old food pyramid and provides clear guidance for how to put together a healthy meal. In addition, for the first time in 20 years, the FDA just finalized a new and improved Nutrition Facts label —with more realistic serving sizes, bigger font to showcase the calorie count and information about how much sugar was added during processing and how much comes from ingredients like fruit—that will soon be on nearly 800,000 food products nationwide

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Amid Rumors of Layoffs, HSBC’s Top Global Marketer to Step Down After 15 Years

June 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Chris Clark, group head of marketing at banking giant HSBC, will soon be leaving the company after more than 15 years. A spokesperson told Adweek, "Chris Clark will be stepping down, but he will remain in the post until a replacement is found." Clark joined the London-based financial company (which is one of the world's largest) in 2001 as head of brand strategy after spending nine years in accounts at WPP's Saatchi & Saatchi, where he worked with such clients as Toyota, Barclays and Birds Eye. The reasons for his departure are unclear, and the company spokesperson said, "There is nothing more to add at this current moment in time." Earlier this week, Reuters and other outlets reported that HSBC would be cutting "dozens" of executive-level jobs in its investment bank unit as recently installed CEO and Goldman Sachs veteran Matthew Westerman aims to make his mark on the organization. According to a report in Business Insider , the company also let several top marketing executives go late last year, including global head of marketing for commercial banking, global banking and markets Amanda Rendle. Clark was not affected by that round of layoffs. HSBC has worked with J. Walter Thompson since 2004, when that shop won a review along with several other WPP units. In 2013, the client divided duties on its business by adding the U.K. offices of Grey and Saatchi & Saatchi to its roster, with the former handling retail promotions in Europe and Latin America and the latter working on the "premier" portions of its portfolio. In a 2012 interview with Campaign , Clark discussed his efforts to reinvent the brand, saying, "There is a lot of jousting at the top of the house which is very cold-eyed and clear-eyed. ... It is a very tough environment sometimes, and a lot of people don't fit." HSBC is among the world's top advertisers. Two years ago, its yearly worldwide marketing spend was estimated to be approximately $575 million. It is not clear at this time whether the departure of the company's top marketer will facilitate another round of reviews.

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Spotify Will Now Let Brands Sponsor the Most Popular Playlists

May 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Remember the old days when you'd give a girl or guy a playlist in the hopes of winning them over? Now, Spotify is letting brands try the same trick. Spotify has begun letting brands sponsor the most popular playlists curated by the music streaming service, offering advertisers a way to match music with a message. Sponsored Playlists, as they're called, match a marketer with a playlist that lines up with a certain audience they have in mind based on campaign objectives. In a blog post today announcing the new offering, Spotify said it will work with advertisers to drive streams to a playlist during the sponsorship through native promotion, brand marketing and social media. "Think content plus context; the right message in the right moment," according to a blog post published today by Spotify. "Cardio or Power Workout are perfect for a footwear brand expanding from lifestyle shoes to workout sneakers. A QSR adding breakfast to the menu? How about Morning Commute? An entertainment company with a summer blockbuster teeny-bopper flick? Teen Party, of course. You get the idea." Spotify will also have in-playlist media packages that include native logo placement, ownership of the first ad break and 100 percent display share of voice (SOV). Sponsored Playlists will only be featured on the free version of the platform. Many of Spotify's more than 400 internally curated playlists already have massive listener bases. For example, the Today's Top Hits playlist has 8 million followers, Rap Caviar has 3 million, ElectroNOW has 2.5 million and Hot Country has 2.4 million. (Just yesterday, Spotify announced that its Discover Weekly playlist is streamed by 40 million users .) Brands including Kia, McDonald's and Target have already begun buying sponsorships during a beta testing. Spotify said Kia—which sponsored New Music Friday to promote the Kia Sportage—used its week to gain a click-through rate that doubled the overall campaign benchmark

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The National Association of Realtors Finds Its Perfect Pitchman in Modern Family Dad

May 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Realtor Phil Dunphy, a key character on ABC's award-winning comedy Modern Family, is the star of Arnold Worldwide's latest initiative for the National Association of Realtors. Dunphy's pitchman status kicked off Wednesday night, in spots airing before and after the latest installment of the show, and during the episode itself, with the character name-checking the NAR code of ethics as a plot point. "We have done only a handful of integrations because they tend to be intrusive and frankly make the show look like it's selling out," Christopher Lloyd, co-executive producer of Modern Family, told Adweek. "This was actually one of the easier ones we've done, since it lent itself to a joke. Phil is bemoaning his career choice as a Realtor, and it's his Realtor skills that ultimately save the day." Lloyd said he wouldn't have approved the concept, "if it seemed like we were just wedging in a pro-Realtor's Association testimonial. We only agreed to do it when we thought of a way to actually use the distinction between what a (NAR-certified) Realtor is and what a real-estate agent is in a funny way." Of course, brand integrations in prime-time programming are nothing new

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Home Depot’s CMO Trish Mueller Resigns After 5 Years in the Top Marketing Role

April 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Trish Mueller has stepped down as chief marketing officer at Home Depot after nearly seven years with the Atlanta-based company. Director of corporate communications Stephen Holmes confirmed to Adweek today that Mueller announced her resignation approximately two weeks ago and that she has been replaced by president of online operations Kevin Hofmann, who will hold both titles. In a statement, Mueller said, "It was an honor and a privilege to work at The Home Depot as CMO for the past 5 years!" She added, "For now, I have decided to take some time off to consider what's next, but I will always 'bleed orange' and be grateful for working for, in my opinion, the best retailer in America." Mueller became vice president of advertising at Home Depot in 2009 after serving as svp of marketing and advertising at Sports Authority. She was promoted to CMO in 2011. Earlier in her career, she held similar positions at retailers including Montgomery Ward, ShopNBC and American Signature-Value City. She has also been an independent director on the board of Dave & Buster's since 2015. Hofmann joined the chain in 2006 as a vice president leading its technology teams with a focus on ecommerce, supply-chain transformation and international operations. He was later promoted to vp of Home Depot's installation division before being promoted again to lead all aspects of its online business in 2013. He previously spent a decade at GE in various leadership positions handling technology, social networking, business intelligence, renewable energy and other corporate functions after working for eight years in research, manufacturing and technology with Dow Chemical.

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Twitter Grows Users and Ad Revenue in First Quarter, but Wall Street Shrugs

April 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter gained 5 million monthly active users in the first three months of 2016, breaking the social media giant's user-growth slump of the past two quarters during which it failed to gain—or actually lost—users. According to the company's first-quarter earnings statement, Twitter reported 310 million MAUs, up from the 305 million it had reported during the second half of 2015. Revenue totaled $595 million for the quarter, a 36 percent increase over the first quarter of 2015. Twitter reported $531 million in advertising revenue in the first three months of the year. That's up 39 percent from the same period in 2015. In the U.S., revenue totaled $390 million, while international revenue accounted for another $204 million. However, the company still fell short of earnings expectations, causing its stock to tumble nearly 10 percent in after-hours trading

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How Hollywood Is Successfully Tapping Into Faith-Based Audiences

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hollywood, sometimes considered the last place to find anything divine, has seen the light lately, releasing a flood of faith-infused entertainment that includes TriStar's Heaven Is for Real, Focus Features' The Young Messiah and a live musical version of The Passion on Fox (which aired on Sunday, March 20). And just in time for Easter, the uplifting family drama, Miracles From Heaven, starring Jennifer Garner and Queen Latifah, is expected to hold its own against the big-budget dystopian thriller The Divergent Series: Allegiant. "Hollywood is churning out faith content with a pace and frequency that has not been seen in a generation," said Chris Stone, founder of advocacy and marketing group Faith Driven Consumer. "There's been a real effort to improve the quality, and we've gone from $2 million movies to $20 million movies aimed at the faith crowd." Among the recent hits: Sony's resurrection story Risen has pulled in a respectable $32 million since its February release, and last fall's paean to prayer, War Room, nearly dethroned Straight Outta Compton for the top box office spot, opening at $11 million on one-third as many screens as the N.W.A. biopic. It eventually made $67 million. God's Not Dead 2, a sequel to the $60 million-grossing original about religious freedom, launches April 1. One of the most anticipated films of the year, Paramount and MGM's remake of the iconic swords-and-sandals epic Ben-Hur premieres in August, the same weekend that Lionsgate opens The Shack, based on a best-selling Christian novel. Marketing for values-centric projects, often aimed squarely at the country's churchgoers, has added sophisticated microtargeting and extensive social media to its arsenal, going "direct to pew" to tap into a traditionally underserved audience, Stone said. Grassroots tactics still lead the way, with studios and for-hire Christian outreach firms setting up church screenings and group ticket sales, gathering pastors and Bible study groups for early endorsements and producing educational and sermon-ready materials. In essence, everyone's using the playbook written during the massive on-the-ground campaign a decade ago for Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ, the most successful faith-based film in history. That approach is often still effective, but there are digital-age updates

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How FX Bids for New Series Without the Big Budget of Netflix

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snap up original series away from linear networks, as well as lure creators with big paydays and promises of creative autonomy, their competitors have had to alter their approaches to bidding for new projects. One of those is FX, which lost out on the bidding for Aziz Ansari's comedy Master of None and the upcoming drama The Crown. Both of those shows went to Netflix after the streaming service "overwhelmed us with shock and awe levels of money and commitment," FX CEO John Landgraf told reporters in January . He also used a "Moneyball" analogy when comparing FX to Netflix, explaining, "Basically, we're competing against payrolls, if you will, a la the Oakland A's and New York Yankees, that are three or four times ours." Because he can't match Netflix dollar for dollar, Landgraf has shifted the focus of his pitches, highlighting other attributes of the network when bidding for shows. Landgraf highlights his marketing team, which has been named PromaxBDA's In-House Marketing Team of the Year for five consecutive years. "I think the talent appreciates that," he told Adweek. Landgraf also emphasizes the personal touch and attention he can give FX's shows versus Netflix, which now has 100 series in the pipeline—55 for adults, 45 for children. "Our network is more of a bespoke organization than a factory. We're at about 18 shows, and that's the most that I can personally pay attention to," said Landgraf. While he could maybe do as many as 20, "I'm at the max in terms of being able to read scripts, watch rough cuts, have a thoughtful input and dialogue." And that's important, even when the network doesn't have much creative feedback in terms of notes for producers. Landgraf said that his deal with Louis CK for Louie specified that the network wasn't able to give him notes.

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After Spoofing SI’s Swimsuit Issue, FX’s Archer Wants You To Turn Off Your Cell Phones in Theaters

March 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

FX has been making a lot of noise with its marketing campaign for Archer's upcoming Season 7, which has already spoofed the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and recreated Magnum P.I.'s opening credits. But now, the network's marketing team is quieting things down for the next phase of its Archer campaign: a new PSA urging movie theaters to silence their cell phones. The spot, which will begin airing Friday in Spotlight Cinema Networks' 200 arthouse venues nationwide, features Archer and Lana, the stars of FX's hit animated comedy. It will run for three weeks, until Thursday, March 31, the day of Archer's Season 7 premiere. This is the third time that Archer's production team, Floyd County Productions, has created a "turn off your cell phone" PSA for Spotlight. "We've done different sequences each year. We change it up and have a whole new setting," said Lance Reiss, svp of marketing for FX. The previous spots were both gold winners in the PromaxBDA Awards' "Promos at the Movies" category, in 2015 and 2013. Last month, the network partnered with Sports Illustrated to feature faux swimsuit shots of its female characters in the swimsuit issue and "The Girls of Archer" branded content online. Because Archer is animated, most of the marketing requires close collaboration between Reiss' team and the show's executive producers, Adam Reed and Matt Thompson, who need to incorporate any marketing-related animation into the show's production schedule. "Yes, they are extremely busy making a show, but the great thing is I think they're marketers at heart too, because they really respond when we come to them," said Reiss. For example, Reed and Thompson came up with one of the first components of this year's campaign: the shot-for-shot remake of Magnum P.I.'s opening credits, featuring the Archer cast, which FX posted in early February to tease season 7, which finds the former spies moving to L.A. to work as private investigators. "So that's part of a collaboration of, they have an idea, can we make it part of our marketing campaign, or we have an idea for our marketing campaign, can they help us out with it? That's where it's really become such a dynamic collaboration between the network and the animation studio," said Reiss. "We help motivate each other, and in the end, I think it benefits the show and keeps the show fresh." And there's more to come, said Reiss. "We capitalized on the SI swimsuit issue, but there are other key themes and events that are going on in the marketplace—political buzz, spring break—so we decided to take our Archer-esque shot at those as well," he said. To capitalize on the country's fascination/revulsion with Donald Trump's Presidential campaign, FX is partnering with Uproxx on a feature—"Who Said It Best: Trump or Archer?"—which will run next week. "It's very timely, and it's perfect in tone with the show, as well as capitalizing on what's happening around us in society," said Reiss, who previously worked with Uproxx last year on branded content featuring "hacked" naked photos from the phone of Archer character Pam Poovey . The network has partnered with the website Total Frat Move to feature a photo submission contest centered around spring break, and Pam Poovey's 10 tips for spring break

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