Posts Tagged ‘marketing’

Q&A: Frito-Lay’s New CMO on Why the Brand Is Making Doritos Out of Cardboard

October 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Over the years, Frito-Lay has tried some pretty wild things to get the public excited about snacks. From spotlighting its potato farmers to dipping chips in chocolate to letting the public shoot its Super Bowl spots, the $14 billion PepsiCo subsidiary clearly isn't afraid to take a few risks—including manufacturing Doritos out of cardboard. Jennifer Saenz Courtesy of Frito-Lay Just in time for election season, and in partnership with Rock the Vote , Doritos has unveiled "Boldest Choice." The campaign encourages young Americans to vote by reminding them that failing to choose is the equivalent of choosing nothing. How's it do that? With flavorless chips. (We'll explain below.) Like much of Frito-Lay's unusual marketing in recent years, this latest initiative is the work of Jennifer Saenz, who after years of leading innovation strategy moved into the CMO's office in February. Business brought Saenz to New York last week where Adweek met her for a bite and a quick chat. Adweek: The goal of "Boldest Choice" is to get young people out to vote—but how does voting reinforce the brand message for Doritos? Jennifer Saenz: The narrative that we have on Doritos is really about bold action. That bold action can take many forms, whether it's in the form of entertainment or movies or music or, in this case, engagement in the democratic process. What we try to do as a brand is stay relevant in consumer conversation, and the election is a really popular topic.

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NBC Takes Over New World Trade Center Station With GIFs Promoting Superstore

September 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC teamed with Giphy for a Superstore GIF installation that operates through Oct. 16. NBC New York commuters who travel through the new World Trade Center transportation hub were met with quite the spectacle today, the debut of a football field-size GIF installation for NBC's sophomore sitcom Superstore. NBC and Giphy partnered on the campaign, which features GIFs of the show's cast, and which the network hopes will appeal to millennials. The network is advertising on all 19 LED displays of a marble-lined corridor in the World Trade Center transportation hub, which opened earlier this year. It's the first entertainment company to appear in the space. The nine most prominent of the 9-by-8-foot panels are devoted to the Superstore installation, with the other 10 featuring more traditional key art for NBC's other shows. "It's about the length of a football field; it's absolutely insane," said Kjerstin Beatty, svp of media at NBC Entertainment. "Customization is everything. That's the way we're able to connect with audiences in a very fragmented world." The network was looking for a different campaign to mark the return of its first successful sitcom in several years. While most series end up advertising in Times Square, "what World Trade Center represented to us was this beautiful, new canvas for us to create something custom and speak to the tech and advertising communities and the very young workforce that's down there," said Beatty.

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How Play-Doh Went From Being a Household Cleaning Supply to a Beloved Toy

September 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Joseph McVicker was in big trouble. Kutol Products, his Cincinnati company, manufactured a gummy, doughy product that housewives used to remove coal soot from wallpaper. But now it was 1955. Not only were vinyl wallpapers coming onto the market, but homes were switching from coal stoves to oil and natural gas that burned cleaner. Kutol was fast becoming obsolete. Play-Doh lion crafted by Emily Shellenberger; Prop stying and lettering: Dianna McDougall; Photo: Raquel Beauchamp That might have been the end of it for McVicker were it not for his sister-in-law Kay who happened to be a nursery school teacher

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OMD’s Digital Head Wants to Foster Cooperation Between Media and Creative Partners

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig OMD, chief digital and innovation officer Previous gig Meredith Xcelerated Marketing, chief innovation officer, general manager Twitter @dougs_digs Age 41 Adweek: You've been OMD 's chief digital and innovation officer for about three months. What's that role like? Doug Rozen: On the digital side, it's really about ensuring that all clients, as well as ourselves internally, are delivering against the fullest and widest array of digital possibilities. For me, what this comes down to is that digital today is not any particular thing or any specific channel—it really stretches across all [channels] and is about rising above talking about TV, print, radio, desktop, etcetera, as channels, and start talking more about formats like audio, video, visual and how then digital allows those formats to be addressable. Now coupled with that is the innovation side, and innovation is not just big media breakthroughs—although they are awesome and necessary—to me it's about every client [having] an innovation agenda. What do you mean by that

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Fox Sports Is Banking on Skip Bayless to Be Its ‘Undisputed’ Champ

September 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Skip Bayless is considered one of the most articulate, fearless and polarizing figures on sports television today. The sports columnist turned on-air personality gained fame from a partnership with another outspoken figure, Stephen A. Smith, on ESPN2's weekday morning debate program First Take. Bayless, 64, left ESPN and is taking his contrarian viewpoints, including a propensity to bash three-time NBA champion LeBron James and an undying love for ex-NFL quarterback Tim Tebow, to Fox Sports and a new show for FS1 called Skip and Shannon: Undisputed. The program's format mirrors that of First Take, but Bayless gets a new sparring partner in NFL Hall-of-Famer and CBS Sports analyst Shannon Sharpe and a new moderator in FS1 host Joy Taylor. The program will air live on weekday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET. Fox Sports considers the addition of Bayless a coup for the company and believes the news merits a significant multiplatform marketing campaign. Marketing elements for Bayless' arrival include a multimillion-dollar, off-channel media plan including billboards, TV and digital; a digital video stunt in which Bayless and Sharpe debate sports with customers at an L.A. barber shop; a Times Square billboard takeover, which will be up during the series premiere on Tuesday; a social media promotion where fans can tweet at Fox Sports for a chance to win a daily breakfast delivered by GrubHub vendors in local markets; and a 12-foot Skip Bayless bobblehead, which will travel to FS1 college football games across the country this fall. The promotion kicked off Friday at the Kansas State-Stanford game in Palo Alto, Calif.

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Olympic Roundup: Carmelo Anthony Shatters a U.S. Record

August 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Team USA once again had a great night in Rio, staying on top in the medal count (now 32). Here are the most important stories for marketers to know about the last 24 hours of the Olympics: Medal Count: Team USA Still Leads in Both Golds and Overall On Wednesday, Kristin Armstrong won the gold in the women's cycling time trial, and Daryl Homer earned a silver medal in fencing. Also, the United States' Sam Dorman and Mike Hixon brought in a silver medal for the men's synchronized 3-meter springboard event. But the United States' success didn't end there. (SB Nation) Here's the leaderboard as it stood going into Thursday: United States: 32 China: 23 Japan: 18 Russia: 15 Great Britain: 12 Carmelo Anthony Becomes Leading Basketball Olympic Scorer in U.S. History During the first quarter of the United States' game Wednesday, Carmelo Anthony became the country's all-time leading scorer, with 276 points. He ended the game with 31 points, making his total 293. (NBC Olympics) Katie Ledecky Adds Third Gold as U.S. Wins 4x200 Freestyle Relay Americans beat Australia by just 0.90 seconds Wednesday in the 4x200-meter freestyle, giving Katie Ledecky another gold medal - her third at the Rio Olympics. The U.S. was trailing during the first three legs of the race, but then Ledecky entered the pool. (ESPN) Why Do Olympic Pools Keep Turning Green?

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Ad of the Day: Marco Polo Struggles With His Own Pool Game in Geico’s New Campaign

August 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

One of the last places you'd expect to see 13th century Venetian explorer Marco Polo would be in a pool with a bunch of kids during a round of the modern-day water game Marco Polo. But that's exactly where he appears in Geico's latest goofy commercial from The Martin Agency, which juxtaposing the surprise of the off-kilter visual gag with the obviousness of what the the insurer emphasizes as its competitive edge—lower rates for consumers. The theme of the new mini-campaign is, "It's not surprising." In the spot, the famous traveler stands, in full period garb, chest deep in a backyard pool, completely baffled while a handful of children swim around him yelling "Marco" and "Polo." His ineffectual attempts to bridge the gap are entertaining enough. "Excuse me," he says in Italian, "I am Marco Polo." Alas, it's to no avail. But the ad's true highlight is its llama—apparently Polo's ride to the party (which is in itself a bit of a surprise—it made it to South America sometime in the past 700 years, too). It stands outside the pool, peering over the edge at the commotion, face permanently fixed in a state of bored indignation. That's a more subtle role than many of Geico's animal figures, who often stand front and center in its ads—earlier this year, an obnoxious talking alligator showed viewers how to properly dodge a lunch check, building on a long, amusing history of using animals to help sell its policies. This aloof, understated approach works well, and in the end, even the hapless Polo catches on to the rules and joins the fun, making for a charming little last shot. Of course, perhaps most surprising of all is how calm parents and Geico customers Amanda and Keith are about the oddly dressed old man with the pack animal crashing their family afternoon. Then again, maybe saving $645 on car insurance when they have three kids to raise—the new campaign also notably shows actual Geico customers and their actual savings—might well have the same effect on them as popping a couple of Valium

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Fox Finishes Upfront Sales Strong Thanks to Interest in New Shows Like Lethal Weapon

July 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After nursing its wounds during last year's upfront presentation, Fox is in a much more celebratory mood this time around. The Fox Networks Group—which includes Fox, Fox Sports, FX, FXX, National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo Wild and Nat Geo Mundo (but not Fox News Channel)—has wrapped its upfront negotiations with volume increases of around 5 percent in CPM (cost per thousand viewers reached) and gains in the high single-digits to low double-digits, according to a person familiar with negotiations. This is a big reversal from last year's mediocre upfront, where Fox—which had fallen to fourth place in the 18-49 demo despite the arrival of Empire—had CPMs that were down as much as 2 percent below the 2014-15 upfront. Volume had been flat at the time. Fox rebounded slightly this past season to third place among the broadcast networks. For the second upfront, ad sales chief Toby Byrne and his team sold inventory across its entire portfolio (except for Fox News). The group had upfront success with its plans to reduce National Geographic Channel's ad load by up to 50 percent for its new series and specials. Fox had the strongest buyer interest from new fall dramas Lethal Weapon and Pitch, as well as midseason entries 24: Legacy, Star and its revival of Prison Break. Buyers had reacted enthusiastically to almost all of Fox's new shows during May's upfront presentation. The network will premiere all 16 of its fall series during a one-week blitz in September. Fox kicked off the marketing campaign for fall baseball drama Pitch during last night's 87th MLB All-Star Game. ABC finished its upfront sales last week, while CBS and The CW wrapped up their upfront deals on June 27

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Chobani Tells Inspiring Team USA Stories in Its Multifaceted Olympics Campaign

July 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Olympic athletes need to put good stuff into their bodies in order to succeed. But good food alone won't win them any medals at this summer's games in Rio, according to Chobani's new multifaceted Olympics campaign in which athletes need to eliminate all the bad stuff in order to win. Stemming from the idea that Chobani helps power Olympic athletes with its all-natural products and a belief on the part of the brand's founder that "you can only be great if you're full of goodness," Chobani has launched a huge Olympics push, including TV spots, newly designed packaging, social components and more. The campaign, centered around the slogan "No Bad Stuff," stars a diverse crew of Team USA hopefuls including soccer star Alex Morgan, decathlete Ashton Eaton, boxer Marlen Esparza, paratriathlon competitor Melissa Stockwell and wrestler Jordan Burroughs, among others. The five athletes star in a larger anthem spot as well as shorter 30- and 15-second spots, created in partnership with agency Opperman Weiss, all meant to showcase how Chobani and the athletes don't allow bad things in their products, bodies or lives. "In order for these athletes to really reach their ultimate place of greatness it's not only that they can't let shitty food get into their body—they can't eat sugars and preservatives and chemicals and all that stuff—but they also can't allow negativity into their being and spirit, whether that's racism or hatred or jealousy or pride, all of those things that are blocks to greatness to athleticism," Jeff Weiss, Opperman Weiss co-founder, told Adweek. Chobani carefully selected the athletes featured in the campaign, spending roughly four months finding a diverse group of competitors that not only have the potential to win medals but have also overcome adversity to get to the level they're at today. But beyond selecting athletes with a chance to medal for Team USA in Rio, Chobani also wanted to work with athletes who love its product and consume it regularly, and also "have very strong values, beliefs and work ethics [and are] wonderful community citizens," Peter McGuinness, chief marketing and brand officer at Chobani, told Adweek. In the 30-second spots, Chobani dives deeper into individual athletes' stories, showing consumers how each one overcame adversity—Morgan's coach telling her, at the age of 13, that she would never be a great soccer player, for instance, or Esparza proving that women can kick butt in the boxing ring. Each athlete's story is, of course, inspiring. But perhaps most inspiring of the 30-second spots is Stockwell's

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How Iron Maiden Made the Boeing 747 Badass Again

June 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Celebrity endorsements are a cornerstone of advertising nowadays, but an industrial manufacturing giant like Boeing seldom gets the chance to play that game. What celebrity is going to tout stuff like cargo hold capacity and cruising range? Well, Boeing's chance came several weeks ago, when one of its 747-400 jumbo jets touched down at the company's manufacturing plant in Everett, Wash., with Captain Bruce Dickinson at the controls. Dickinson is better known as the frontman for Iron Maiden , the British heavy-metal band that's sold over 90 million records in a career spanning four decades. The 57-year-old Dickinson's talent for soaring applies to more than his voice: Since the 1990s, he's also held a commercial pilot's license. Iron Maiden is currently in the middle of a six-continent, 35-city tour in a chartered 747. And Dickinson is doing all the flying. Iron Maiden vocalist Bruce Dickenson (center, foreground) is also a commercial pilot.

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