Posts Tagged ‘marketing’

It’s Time Marketers Rethink Their Commitment to Content

January 19, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Eighty-six percent of B-to-C marketers in a recent study say they will be including content marketing in their budgets this year. That makes plenty of sense because it's no secret that as consumer attention scatters across channels, devices, times and places, simply hammering people over the head with paid advertising is becoming harder to do. Adam Kleinberg The word "content" means something is more than an ad. Content implies value—perhaps utility, education, empowerment or entertainment. Regardless, content is powerful for brands because a value exchange is at play. The more value brands put in, the more value they get out—in currencies of attention, intention, loyalty, and ultimately, sales. Of course, content has very little value if it sucks. In fact, if your content marketing is lousy, it can actually hurt your brand. Doing content marketing well requires commitment on many levels. The same Content Marketing Institute (CMI) study mentioned above shows that 90 percent of the organizations deemed "most successful" were characterized as "extremely committed" to content marketing. That's compared to 37 percent of such commitment from organizations classified as "least successful." "We're committed," you might be saying, "We've allocated budget and a team to getting this done." Good on you. However, there are a number of dimensions of commitment that need to be attained to maintain a content marketing operation that delivers high value for your customers and your brand. Commitment to Insight It is trite to say, "quality matters," but what kind of content actually is good content? Too often the output of content marketing programs is a fire hose of crap across every imaginable channel that people don't actually want.

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Adweek Unveils 3 Departments Featuring Insights, Data and Future-Forward Businesses

January 3, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In this age of inexorable disruption the embrace of rapid change has moved well beyond table stakes to become the basis for any chance of survival. Adweek feels this pressure in our digital products on an almost daily basis. But we also have the privilege of producing a weekly magazine and that too must change in order to remain as competitive, relevant and profitable as possible. It's a car we have to fine-tune even as it speeds ever faster through the twisting roads of the brand-marketing ecosystem. So with that in mind, in this issue, our first of 2017, Adweek editor Lisa Granatstein is introducing three new departments—Whiteboard, Dashboard and Talent Pool—that truly reflect topics of crucial importance for our audience: role modeling success, data, insights, and talent acquisition and deployment.

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Impact Marketing in Today’s Political Climate

Do Good Better 2017
January 2, 2017  |  Blog  |  No Comments

In today’s global climate, smart marketing strategies are ones that can help solve some of the world’s biggest problems. With this challenge, we all know that behavioral change and scale are key. Here’s what a few of our Do Good Better 2017 speakers and impact marketing innovators have done to not only expand bottom lines and further their business’s profile but to increase customer loyalty, build goodwill all while actually changing the world and solving some tough problems. Jay Curley, Senior Marketing Manager for Ben & Jerry’s: Jay Curley is the Senior Global Marketing Manager for Ben & Jerry’s. Jay leads the development

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For Trojan, Inventive Packaging Made the Sale When Advertising Wasn’t Allowed

December 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The year 2016 saw a lot of talk about the state of American manufacturing—about jobs making stuff for great American brands. And while most of the discussion centered on products like General Electric light bulbs and Carrier air conditioners, it’s worth pointing out one brand that’s received very little press—even though all of its manufacturing takes place in the U.S. (in Colonial Heights, Va.); even though untold numbers of the 500 million products it turns out yearly are used every day of the week. Well, maybe more like every night of the week. The product? Trojan condoms. Condoms are big business in the land of the free

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For Trojan, Inventive Packaging Made the Sale When Advertising Wasn’t Allowed

December 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The year 2016 saw a lot of talk about the state of American manufacturing—about jobs making stuff for great American brands. And while most of the discussion centered on products like General Electric light bulbs and Carrier air conditioners, it’s worth pointing out one brand that’s received very little press—even though all of its manufacturing takes place in the U.S. (in Colonial Heights, Va.); even though untold numbers of the 500 million products it turns out yearly are used every day of the week. Well, maybe more like every night of the week. The product? Trojan condoms. Condoms are big business in the land of the free. According to Zion Research, Americans are forecast to spend nearly $1.6 billion on them by 2020

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Despite Post-Election Depression, Social Chatter Around Black Friday Is Mostly Positive

November 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Despite the negative nature of pre- and post-election social, Americans seem to at least be on the up and up when it comes to shopping. According to an analysis of social conversations conducted by the Marketing Cloud social team at Salesforce , nearly 80 percent of all Black Friday conversation have been positive in nature in the 30 days leading up to it. Salesforce—which so far has tracked 934,000 mentions of Black Friday and Cyber Monday—said 78.6 percent of posts have been positive, with leading topics including deals, the season and online shopping. The volume of social conversation about Black Friday seems to keep growing, with 2016 up 30 percent over 2015. (Last year, overall volume was up 20 percent over 2014.) So who's doing all the shop talk? According to Salesforce, 56 percent of dialog is coming from women. Also notable is that the higher percentage of mentions isn't coming from social-savvy millennials—the largest group has been consumers between the ages of 25 and 34, with the 35- to 44- year-old demographic also contributing more than other groups

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Ad of the Day: Ram Trucks Salutes Blue-Collar Workers in Big, Poetic Ad for Thanksgiving

November 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ram Trucks is giving thanks this holiday in classic Fiat Chrysler style with a big, sweeping, poetic paean to blue-collar American workers—in a 90-second spot from The Richards Group, airing Thursday, that gives praise to waitresses, janitors, mill and factory workers, fishermen and more, as well as the work they do. The spot honors the "true everyday heroes" who may often struggle to make ends meet but always "labor to make their families and this nation strong," according to press materials. Each line of the poetic voiceover begins with the word "praise," lending an almost religious feel to the sacrifices these men and women make—the grueling workdays that help make their family time at home possible. The spot will air on Thanksgiving Day during the NFL games on CBS and Fox. "Appropriately airing on Thanksgiving Day when families across the country take time to reflect and give thanks, 'Praise' is the Ram brand's tribute to hard-working Americans and the story of people who are the backbone of our country," said Olivier Francois, global CMO of Fiat Chrysler. The spot evokes the famous Ram "Farmer" ad that ran on the 2013 Super Bowl, which Francois references in speaking about the "Praise" ad. "Just as the brand paid homage to American farm families a few years back during a Super Bowl telecast, we always look for opportunities to build unique, impactful creative around a defining cultural moment that allows us to reach large audiences in a very effective way

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What Marketers Can Learn From America’s Election Shock

November 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If my Facebook newsfeed is any indication, the world of advertising is currently filled with hand-wringing, astonishment and in some cases, all-out despair. There are tears and complete shock that we seem to have gotten it all wrong. Liz Ross The results of the presidential election were shocking to many, especially with election forecasters putting Hillary Clinton's chance of winning at anywhere from 70 percent to as high as 99 percent. How they got it so wrong is a cautionary tale not just for pollsters, but for marketers as well. The absolute No. 1 takeaway we should have tattooed on our collective forehead is that data, and the subsequent algorithms we use to parse that data, do not understand human emotion, especially the most intense forms—love, hate, anger, joy and loneliness. Emotions, which define who we are as humans, do not fit on an election forecaster's data chart just as they cannot be summarized through an evaluation of our Amazon purchases or our online surfing behavior. Our digital selves only represent a piece (a small but growing piece) of who we are. While the digital footprint of those of us in cities is growing exponentially, we must not project our own behavior and patterns on those in other parts of the country. My running joke is that people on the West Coast all believe the U.S. will soon have its toilet paper delivered by drone and people on the East Coast believe that everyone buys their toilet paper one roll at a time. Neither of these things is true, of course, and the reality is that most of the people in the middle of the country live different lives than those on the coasts. So if we want to know something or claim to know something about a person or a community, we sure as hell better be tuned in to their humanity and not just their statistics. We are in advertising, one of the most amazing industries in the world—an industry of creative thinkers, eccentrics and people who challenge the status quo. We are also an industry filled with optimists, and no time in history have we needed optimism more than we do today. So let's be the optimists we are, and use this moment of national tension as a learning opportunity. Here are four ideas for how marketers can do things differently as a result of what we learned from the election: • Stop using the word "consumer." It is a pejorative term, indicating that there are mindless people waiting in the world for messages and information from brands. No one in the world simply consumes; they are complex humans who make choices every single day. Regarding them as actual people will make our marketing better

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Why the CMA Awards and Country Music Fans Are So Appealing to Brands Now

November 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you're looking for evidence of country music's broadening appeal, look no further than the opening act of tonight's CMA Awards—Beyonce. But while country crossover acts have been around for quite a while, more brands are getting involved with the CMA, tonight and year-round, because they want to tap into the genre's increasingly diverse, and increasingly urban, fan base, as marketing execs attested today at the CMA Marketing Summit in Nashville, Tenn., ahead of tonight's show. Forty-two percent of U.S. adults are country fans, and that fan base has grown 30 percent over the past 10 years, with 23 percent growth in the West Coast market, including Los Angeles, and 25 percent growth in the mid-Atlantic region, including New York, according to the CMA. There also has been a 33 percent growth in African-American country music fans and an 18 percent growth in Hispanic fans in the past decade. "The country consumer isn't the stereotype that's been around for a lot of years," said Damon Whiteside, svp of marketing and strategic partnerships at CMA. "The audience is getting younger and more diverse, and 35 percent of our audience is millennial, which makes it more powerful for brands

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Ad of the Day: Stephen Curry Vows to Avenge NBA Finals Loss in Under Armour Spot

October 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Under Armour doesn't seem to mind when its star athletes fall just short of a championship. It makes for a better story when the next chance comes around. UA and its agency, Droga5, have crafted a few of these redemption stories already—the famous one with London 2012 underachiever Michael Phelps ahead of Rio 2016, and Super Bowl runner-up Cam Newton's recent spot ahead of the Panthers' 2016-17 season. Now, it's time for UA's biggest star, Stephen Curry, to avenge his loss to the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals in June, a devastating finale to an otherwise dream season for Curry and the Golden State Warriors. (Curry set a record for 3-pointers and was the league's unanimous MVP, while the Warriors set their own record by finishing 73-9.) Curry, 28, tweeted out the new video, made by Droga5 and MJZ director Harmony Korine, about an hour ago. It's a dark, gritty, neon-hued spot that acknowledges, among Curry's notable 2015-16 successes, the one big failure—and aims to make it right. Or as the spot puts it: "Make that old." There's nothing too revolutionary going on here. Fans—who are actually local youth basketball players—are seen gathering to celebrate Curry's achievements, then exhort him to do even better. Curry broods, then enters a glowing-pink practice court and gets to work.

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