Posts Tagged ‘internet’

‘Expendables 3’ Leaks Online, Pirated Copy Downloaded 189,000 Times in 24 Hours

July 25, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

A DVD-quality copy of actioner “The Expendables 3,” starring Sylvester Stallone, has been downloaded via piracy sites more than 189,000 times over a 24-hour period — three weeks ahead of the U.S. premiere. The leak of the film on the Internet ahead of its theatrical debut, an unusually rare occurrence, could dampen box office for... Read more

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Chris Colfer Doesn’t Want to Know What the Internet Thinks of Him

July 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Chris Colfer Age 24 Accomplishments Star of Fox’s Glee; screenwriter; author of The Land of Stories book series (his latest, A Grimm Warning, was just released) Base Los Angeles What’s the first information you consume in the morning? I immediately turn to my cellphone and look to make sure that nothing awful has happened while I’ve been asleep [laughs]. If I’m lucky and I don’t find anything on my phone, I might sleep a little longer. Where do you get your news? I’m on the CNN app on my phone a lot. My fans keep me very much in the loop on anything regarding me, which I tend to try to not look at too much because that can get a little cuckoo. So you don’t have a Google alert set for your name

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This Is How Your Financial Data Is Being Used to Serve You Ads

July 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Wait, who sees my credit card bill, again? We've done a lot of work

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Nielsen Exec: Don’t Expect to Be Impressed by Impact of Mobile TV Ratings

July 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nielsen Media Research has declared itself "open for business" in terms of tracking TV viewing on smartphones, tablets and other electronic gadgets. But don’t expect those numbers, which will be available for the first time with the new fall broadcast season, to be impressive, statistically speaking. "It will start small and build gradually," Cheryl Idell, Nielsen’s evp of U.S. media, said at the semi-annual Television Critics Association conference kickoff in Beverly Hills. “We won’t see dramatic changes in ratings with this data added in.” That may not be the big splash the advertising community has been hoping for. Claire Browne, vp, director of media research at ad agency RPA in Los Angeles, described Nielsen as "behind the curve" and "playing catch-up" on measuring mobile viewing, a project that’s been in the works for years. "They have to do this to remain relevant," she said. "Consumer behavior is running so far ahead of the research." Nielsen first announced the long-gestating service last fall, promising TV networks a better cross-platform gauge of total viewers so they can set their ad rates accordingly. Advertisers are also clamoring for the data so they can strike the best media buying deals and keep up with the on-the-go consumer who’s increasingly turning to mobile devices for entertainment.

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Univision and Telemundo Are Battling It Out on a Digital Front

July 1, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Alicia Menendez is a digital and mobile junkie. The 30-year-old host of Alicia Menendez Tonight, a weeknight talk program about sex, money and power on Univision and ABC’s joint-venture news network Fusion , is practically fused to her mobile device, even when she’s watching TV. “I just want them in tandem. One augments the other,” she says one evening after filming a segment at the Univision/Fusion Newsport headquarters in Doral, Fla., just outside of Miami. A few miles away in Hialeah, Telemundo novelas Web producer Veronica de la Fuente trawls telenovela content to find fresh social media fodder. With hundreds of thousands of Facebook fans following the more popular soaps, it’s safe to say these aren’t your grandmother’s programs. “Things that never fail: the actresses’ dresses and the handsome guys of the novela,” says de la Fuente. The jobs of these women illustrate the contrasting ways in which Univision and Telemundo are reaching into the digital space. (Both companies have fought for decades to secure Hispanic TV audiences—a fight Univision has dominated.) Where Univision is looking to grow new digital businesses like Fusion and online destination Flama, Telemundo chooses to mine its existing strong suit—telenovelas—for digital iterations. They want the same thing—to attract young and active Hispanic millennials—but are going about it in much different ways. Growing Up Hispanic There’s a good reason the companies are aggressively building out digitally

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Community Is Getting Its Six Seasons (No Movie Yet)

June 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Well, that was close. Sony's offbeat sitcom Community, canceled at the very last minute by NBC, has been renewed at the very last minute (a few hours before contracts with Sony were set to expire, in fact) by Yahoo Screen . Thirteen episodes of the sitcom will air on Yahoo starting in the fall. At the Digital Content NewFronts this year, companies like Yahoo, YouTube and Crackle were voluble about a commitment to premium content; now Yahoo, at least, will be able to say that, like Netflix, it has a sitcom with huge cult appeal (albeit some very low live viewership ) and, unlike Netflix, it's selling ad inventory against that show. Community essentially lived on goodwill and fandom for five years on NBC; after two consecutive half-season orders (during which time the network inexplicably pitted the geeky comedy against the Death Star of geeky comedies, CBS's unbeatable nerdfest The Big Bang Theory), NBC president Bob Greenblatt finally pulled the plug. Showrunner and creator Dan Harmon was initially blas

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ESPN Breaks Record as Fans Watch Instead of Working

June 27, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ESPN metered market numbers for yesterday's 12 p.m. match between the U.S. and Germany got a 6.3 rating, including an hour of pregame starting at 11 a.m. That's great, considering the game kicked off in the middle of a day and much of the viewership would have been in workplaces. Indeed, the sports network's digital platform, WatchESPN, got so many concurrent viewers—a peak of 1.7 million, which breaks the platform's record—that the digital edition of the game sputtered and died for quite a few folks who wanted to contribute to that number. Still, that's more peak concurrents than the Super Bowl. Viewership on Univision's digital platform peaked around 750,000. Fast nationals for ESPN and overnights for Univision are not yet available, but the digital explosion suggests that networks and digital video providers can ill afford to buy data that doesn't include advertisements delivered in the workplace. Whether people are watching on their lunch breaks or surreptitiously in a tiny window when the boss isn't looking, it's become clear that if you're sitting in front of a computer all day with what is probably a faster Internet connection than you've got at home, you're going to watch TV.

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Consumer Reports Poll: Majority Oppose Comcast-Time Warner Cable Merger

June 20, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The proposed merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable is opposed by 56% of the public, with large percentages believing that it will lead to higher prices for cable and Internet service, according to a poll conducted by Consumer Reports. The online survey, conducted in April, showed that just 11% support the transaction, and 32%... Read more

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Netflix Will Stop Telling Customers Verizon Is Making Their Movies Load Slower

June 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix said Monday it would comply with Verizon's cease-and-desist letter, sent to both the general public and Netflix general counsel David Hyman from Verizon general counsel Randal S. Milch. The letter's complaints against Netflix were that the streaming service was misrepresenting the "many different factors that affect traffic on the Internet," including the controversy over whether or not Verizon is obliged to provide free access to its network based on user preference. In response, Netflix said that as part of a "transparency campaign" to tell users when the network they were using was choking Netflix content, "we started a small scale test in early May that lets consumers know, while they’re watching Netflix, that their experience is degraded due to a lack of capacity into their broadband provider’s network. "We are testing this across the U.S. wherever there is significant and persistent network congestion," the company said in a blog post bylined to communications vp Joris Evers. "This test is scheduled to end on June 16. We will evaluate rolling it out more broadly." While this is sort of a non-denial-denial—we don't admit that what we're doing is wrong but coincidentally, we're going to stop doing it—on the heels of the Verizon C&D letter, it comes with yet another dig at Verizon: a post from the company's ISP speed ranker, a fascinating tool you can check out yourself here . With the new site, which appears to dynamically measure average bandwidth—that's actual bandwidth, not advertised bandwidth—you can see that Netflix's data streams a lot slower from Verizon's DSL service (which is definitely incredibly slow), but you can also see, among other things, that the U.S. has some of the slowest streaming speeds in the developed world, below every European country except Ireland and lagging behind much poorer countries elsewhere in the Americas like Mexico and Brazil.

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Netflix Creates the Best Worst Website for Its New Cartoon, BoJack Horseman

June 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix has done quite a bit of clever marketing in its recent past, from the minimalist teasers for House of Cards to its fake listings for shows featured in Arrested Development. The streaming service's newest oddity is part of the promotion for BoJack Horseman, an upcoming Adult Swim-ish show about a talking horse who's fallen on hard times after the demise of his 1990s sitcom.

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