Posts Tagged ‘international’

Keds and Refinery29 Are Hosting a Pop-Up Market for International Women’s Day

March 8, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you're in New York and head down to 90 Orchard Street today, you'll see a street mural that shows five women and reads, "Be Bold for Change," which is an international theme for Women's History Month. The artwork is just one part of a multi-prong partnership between Keds and Refinery29 to celebrate International Women's...

Read More

A Bookstore Is Brilliantly Visualizing Gender Imbalance by Flipping Around All Male-Written Novels

March 8, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Even if you're a frequent bookstore peruser, this sight be a surprise. Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio, is cleverly "illustrating the gender gap in fiction" by reversing all novels from male writers so that each book's identity is hidden. The move comes just in time for International Women's Day on Wednesday (though, as part...

Read More

How Some Publishers and Platforms Are Participating in ‘A Day Without A Woman’

March 7, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Many popular publishers and platforms will be supporting their female employees on March 8, International Women's Day. Organizers of the Women's March, which took place the day after President Trump's inauguration, also helped put together a plan for people to find ways to participate in a women's strike. A Day Without A Woman was designed...

Read More

Advertising Leaders Say Britain’s Exit From the EU Is Disappointing but Manageable

June 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—As the United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union sent aftershocks through global markets today, the ad industry's top leaders were all in the same place to hear the news. Like thousands of their colleagues, the heads of advertising's largest holding companies are all in Cannes this week for the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Two of the industry's most influential corporations quickly released statements about the "Brexit" decision, with the recurring theme being one of disappointment mixed with optimism after the polarizing decision by British voters. The final result was 52 percent in favor of leaving the EU and 48 percent against, with young voters overwhelmingly casting their ballots to remain a member of the 28-state group. British Prime Minister David Cameron announced at a press conference this morning that he will be stepping down because "the country requires fresh leadership" after the vote.

Read More

A Million Euro Coins Will Feature a Missing Child’s Face Thanks to a Nonprofit and Its Agency

May 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On May 3, 1996, 2-year-old Liam Vanden Branden wandered out the door of his grandmother's house in Mechelen, Belgium. The blond-haired, blue-eyed boy was wearing a gray pullover, green jeans and ecru shoes with the Tom & Jerry cartoon characters on them. This is the last information known about Vanden Branden, because that rainy Friday was also the day he disappeared. He hasn't been seen since. But starting this week, millions of Europeans will see Liam—or, at least, an image of him.

Read More

Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision. What's the biggest difference culturally between the two companies? What I have really enjoyed about being a part of Comcast NBCU is that we have a real mentality of running our businesses as owners, not renters. We really believe in making the investments in our businesses that will deliver long-term results

Read More

Hong Kong Festival Youth Prize Won by ‘Life’

April 3, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

First time director, Zhang Hanyi’s “Life After Life” won the Firebird youth award,at the Hong Kong International Film Festival.

Read More

Netflix Returns Fire, Says NBC Has ‘Remarkably Inaccurate Data’ and 18-49 Demo ‘Means Nothing’

January 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix has kept its ratings metrics under lock and key for several years, refusing to share that data even with the creators of its own original series. So predictably, the streaming service was none too thrilled last week when NBC shared Netflix ratings data from Symphony Advanced Media , which measured the 18-49 demographic of each Netflix episode released last fall. Ted Sarandos, Netflix's chief content officer, returned fire today as he spoke at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour and blasted the "remarkably inaccurate data" from NBC and Symphony. "The methodology and the measurement and the data itself doesn't reflect any sense of reality of anything that we keep track of," said Sarandos, who noted that the 18-49 demographic that Symphony measured "is so insignificant to us that I can't even tell you how many 18-49 year old members we have. …It's an advertising-driven demographic that means nothing to Netflix." Sarandos took a shot at NBC, which in addition to releasing that data said that Netflix doesn't yet pose a "consistent" threat to broadcasters . "Why would NBC use their lunch slot with you to talk about our ratings? Maybe because it's more fun than talking about NBC ratings!" said Sarandos of NBC, which is comfortably leading all networks in adults 18-49. "There is not an apples to apples comparison to Netflix watching and any reported Nielsen rating," said Sarandos, though as usual, he declined to give any specific metrics. "I do think that once we give a number for a show, then every number will be benchmarked off of that show," he said , explaining that some Netflix series are "built for 2 million people" while others are "built for 30 million…that puts a lot of creative pressure on the talent that we don't want to." However, Netflix did make an exception to its "no ratings" mantra by recently sharing some metrics about its original movies Beasts of No Nation and The Ridiculous Six. "A movie with no box office is different than a show with no TV ratings," Sarandos said. "We also wanted to give some people some sense that the investment was making sense." About the only data that Sarandos would provide about Netflix viewing: "somewhere in the world, every second of every day, someone is pushing play to start a Netflix original show." Netflix will spend $6 billion on content in 2016, a figure which covers both original and acquired series, and offer "more than 600 hours of new, high quality original content," said Sarandos. That includes returning shows Marvel's Daredevil (Season 2 debuts March 18) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (April 15), Grace & Frankie (May 6), Orange is the New Black (June 17). Additionally, Netflix announced today that Marvel's Jessica Jones has been picked up for a second season. Netflix is also rolling out several new series—including Will Arnett comedy Flaked (premiering March 11), Ashton Kutcher comedy The Ranch (April 1), French drama Marseille (May 5) and Baz Luhrmann's music drama The Get Down (Aug. 12)‚ while also "doubling down" on kids and family series, launching 20 more of those this year. Despite that overwhelming volume of original content, "we don't think there's too much TV. And if there is too much TV, someone else is going to have to slow down, because we have big plans for 2016 and beyond," said Sarandos. And even as it has accelerated its output, "we don't think we've sacrificed an ounce of quality." Netflix, which is now available in 190 countries, said it thinks globally, not domestically.

Read More

ATF: ‘Lip Sync Battle’ Strikes The Right Notes Across Asia (EXCLUSIVE)

December 3, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Viacom International Media Networks has struck a deal with the Philippines GMA for American format “Lip Sync Battle.”

Read More

A French Company Is About to Become America’s 4th Largest Cable Provider

September 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After 42 years, the Dolan family will no longer control Cablevision. The New York-based cable operator announced this morning it has agreed to sell to Altice Group, a European telecom company controlled by French cable entrepreneur Patrick Drahi. Altice will pay $34.90 a share, making the deal worth $17.7 billion including debt. The acquisition also includes Newsday Media Group, publisher of Newsday and amNewYork, but does not include the Madison Square Garden Company, which owns the namesake arena and the New York Knicks and New York Rangers. It's the second U.S. deal for Altice this year. The company announced plans to acquire Suddenlink Communications, which operates in 17 midwestern and southern states, in May. Cablevision, which predominately serves the New York metro area and Long Island, has about 3.1 million subscribers. Altice says that with Suddenlink and Cablevision combined, it will be the fourth largest U.S. cable provider, behind Comcast, Charter and Time Warner Cable (the latter two of which are attempting to merge). "The deal underscores the increasingly global nature of premium video content and distribution, a trend that is also illustrated by the international growth path that Netflix is on," said Eric Schmitt, evp of TV and media at cross-channel marketing firm Allant. This morning's deal caps a frenzied two years of cable consolidation as subscribers continue to drop cable in favor of going over the top—Cablevision lost 16,000 cable homes in the second quarter while adding 14,000 Internet-only customers. And that's not going to make customers who are increasingly dissatisfied with their cable service any happier, notes Stephen Beck, founder and managing partner of management consultancy cg42. "Cablevision was not as bad from a brand vulnerability perspective as a Comcast or Time Warner, but they had substantial frustrations that customers were experiencing," said Beck, who has found 33 percent of cable customers are not happy with their service. "The frustration rates are higher than any category that we've studied," he said. "Will nontraditional players and OTT providers continue to benefit from the soup of misery that the cable companies seem to want to create for their customers?" Altice has invested heavily in broadband and Internet services for its other global operations. With Cablevision and Suddenlink, it hopes to have the heft to keep what it pays for programming in check. Schmitt said the heat is already high on networks, and this deal could bring it closer to a boiling point; Suddenlink dropped Viacom's channels earlier this year when the two couldn't come to carriage terms.

Read More