Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

You Can Now Manage Accounts on Facebook, Instagram and Facebook Messenger Via One App

November 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Social media directors for organizations and small-to-medium-sized businesses have evidently had a hard time simultaneously managing accounts for Facebook, Instagram and Facebook Messenger. So much so, in fact, that a number of them have evidently been juggling multiple iPhones to make it all work. To help with this, Facebook is unveiling a feature today called universal inbox to handle communications for all three channels via the Facebook Pages app . "Some people have been flipping through different apps to manage their various presences," remarked Benji Shomair, global head of pages at Facebook. "And other people would actually have multiple phones open." Universal inbox will let marketers more easily take note of comments, reviews and direct messages being authored by consumers on Facebook, Instagram and Facebook Messenger. In addition, page managers can use their cursor to tap a user's profile and see his or her publicly available information, potentially giving businesses more insights on how to interact with the potential customer

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Adobe Buys Programmatic Ad Player TubeMogul for $540 Million

November 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a deal to bolster its video offerings for advertisers, Adobe has acquired demand-side platform TubeMogul for $540 million. Programmatic-geared TubeMogul works with brands like Dannon and Quiznos to run digital, mobile and video campaigns by powering the ad-tech pipes in platforms like Facebook and Snapchat. According to Adobe, TubeMogul will get plugged into Adobe Marketing Cloud, the company's tool to help brands manage digital campaigns, primarily in display, social and search. As brands' spending on digital video continues to increase, the addition of TubeMogul will theoretically help Adobe grab bigger digital budgets. The deal is expected to close in the first quarter of 2017. "Adobe and TubeMogul will provide a unified advertising and data management solution that enables brands to precisely identify the right segments and plan, execute and measure paid media across any device," TubeMogul CEO Brett Wilson said in a statement.

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Facebook Made $7 Billion Last Quarter and Now Has 1.79 Billion Monthly Users

November 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Facebook just can't stop adding friends. The tech giant yet again beat its quarterly earnings expectations, reporting revenue of $7.01 billion and a total monthly active user base of 1.79 billion. According to Facebook, which released its third-quarter earnings today, revenue increased year-over-year by 56 percent, up from $4.5 billion during the third-quarter of 2015. Earnings per share were $1.09, up from $.57 during the same period last year. (Analysts had estimated revenue of $6.92 billion and earnings per share of $.97.) Advertising revenue also skyrocketed to $6.82 billion, up 59 percent from third-quarter 2015. Mobile advertising now represents around 84 percent of total ad revenue, up from 78 percent in the third-quarter of 2015. Daily and monthly active users on mobile both also increased. Mobile DAUs increased 22 percent to 1.09 billion, while monthly DAUs were up 20 percent to 1.66 billion. "We had another good quarter," Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement. "We're making progress putting video first across our apps and executing our 10 year technology roadmap." Ad revenue from the second quarter of 2016 decreased , falling from $6.24 billion in the second three months of the year.

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Snapchat Beats Instagram and Facebook as the Top Social Platform for Teens

October 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Snapchat's growth as the preferred social platform for teenagers continues to outpace other social platforms, and it's cutting into Facebook usage. According to investment firm Piper Jaffray's new "Taking Stock With Teens" report, 80 percent of teens use Snapchat at least once a month, up from 74 percent in the fall of 2015. While 79 percent of teenagers said that they use Instagram once a month—an increase from 76 percent one year ago—the photo-sharing app's reach is slightly less than Snapchat. Perhaps more interesting is Snapchat's impact on Facebook, which has fought off reports that teens have fled the social network for cooler platforms in recent years. Piper Jaffray's study now suggests that's true when teenage usage for Facebook is compared to Snapchat. Just 52 percent of respondents in Piper Jaffray's study (which includes 10,000 responses) said that they use Facebook once a month, down from 56 percent in fall 2015. Specifically, younger teens are dropping off of Facebook, while Snapchat and Instagram are neck-and-neck for teens between the ages of 14 and 18. Among 14-year-olds, for example, 80 percent use Instagram once a month, while just less than 80 percent use Snapchat. With Facebook, roughly 30 percent of 14-year-olds use the social network each month, the lowest percentage of all age groups to use the site

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Political Campaigns Need to Embrace Digital Media, If They Haven’t Already

October 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Political ad spending is like a river, but many campaigns continue to falter by swimming against the current. This year's election cycle may prove to be the final time political campaigns are run like it's still the early 2000s. Sean Duggan The shifting dynamics of ad spending in American politics is yet another bizarre component of this memorably quixotic election year. This reality is fueled, at least in part, by the strikingly modest spending on the part of Donald Trump's campaign, particularly during the GOP primary. Trump's commanding early primary victories left a vast field of consultants and campaigns questioning the effectiveness of paid advertising. As we speed toward Nov. 8, some answers are finally imminent. And they could ultimately be nothing short of game changing for politics as usual in advertising. Despite the home-stretch acceleration of ad spending on the part of Trump, Hillary Clinton has still outspent her opponent by a lopsided 7-to-1 ratio during the past three months, according to AP estimates. If Trump manages to win—or even make it respectably close—the reverberations throughout the political advertising world will be nuclear in the force of their impact. In recent years, media planning and campaign tactics have ignored—to their ultimate detriment—major media consumption and communication shifts. As a result, consumer marketers are now doing a better job commandeering the modern media landscape than the majority of political campaign consultants. Consider the decisions of media consultants in charge of spending $100 million for Jeb Bush's super PAC. "The super PAC consistently bought broadcast television advertising in the biggest, most expensive markets at the highest possible rates," said Molly Ball in the October 2016 issue of The Atlantic. "It Fed-Exed tablet-like mailers to New Hampshire voters that played a documentary about Bush's life, and put just 1.4 percent of its budget toward digital ads, an abnormally tiny amount for a top super PAC." A mere 1.4 percent for digital? Just let that sink in for a minute. Political spending on digital media was expected to break the $1 billion mark for the first time in 2016, according to Borrell Associates, but at a paltry 9.5 percent of total spending, it would seriously lag behind most consumer marketing categories now earmarking 30 to 50 percent for digital. Notwithstanding the ballot burnout most Americans are already experiencing this election season, the 2020 presidential campaign will unofficially commence before the confetti stops falling for the next president-elect.

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Ubisoft Worked With Facebook to Uncover and Target 3 Different Types of Video Gamers

October 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

To launch the upcoming game Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands, video game-maker Ubisoft is leaning heavily on Facebook to target ads at specific types of players. While that fact alone isn't very interesting, what is interesting is that the social network is affecting Ubisoft's entire marketing strategy, including its TV creative. In May, Ubisoft ran a weeklong campaign promoting Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands—which is billed as its biggest action adventure ever —making it the first video game brand to match up the platform's segmentation tools with custom bits of video. "For the Ghost Recon campaign, we combined a segmentation entirely built on Facebook insights with customized creative—the creative was tailored for each segment we identified through the segmentation analysis," explained Franco de Cesare, head of console and online gaming at Facebook. The campaign targeted three different types of gamers: tacticians, competitors and explorers. Tacticians were identified as people who love science and technology, while competitors like adrenaline and action.

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Quaker’s Month-Long ‘Oatober’ Campaign Includes 31 Different Oat Recipes

September 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Even oatmeal is going digital. To show that Quaker's oats are used to make more than just oatmeal, the PepsiCo.-owned brand is launching a campaign this weekend as part of a month-long effort the brand is dubbing 'Oatober.' Starting tomorrow, Quaker will start pumping out Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest posts with oat recipes, including muffins, cookies and oatmeal. Then on Sunday, Quaker is running its first Instagram Marquee—the social app's year-old takeover ads that let brands hit large audiences in a short period of time. There is also a Tumblr and webpage launching this weekend and a series of sponsored videos with food publisher Tastemade that will roll out on Snapchat, Facebook and Pinterest later this month. All told, Quaker's campaign will include 31 different recipes for the month of October. "Oatober is a digitally-focused campaign because the digital and social space is where people connect with food and share their experiences," said Becky Frankiewicz, svp and gm of Quaker Foods North America. "Food trends online have inspired some of our marketing campaigns, such as overnight oats. You can also find many oat-based recipes on Quakeroats.com." The campaign also includes a big media buy with The New York Times. On Sunday, the brand will run a full-page ad in the newspaper and start an online campaign within the cooking section of the site.

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ANA Asks Facebook to Open Up Its Platform for More Third-Party Measurement

September 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

One week after details about Facebook inflating its video metrics for advertisers were discovered, the Association of National Advertisers has called for an audit and accreditation of the social platform's metrics. The ANA's qualms stem from a report in The Wall Street Journal last week finding that Facebook overestimated the amount of time users spend with videos by anywhere from 60 to 80 percent, according to a letter from Facebook to Publicis Media that the publication acquired. Facebook has since apologized, with multiple execs at Advertising Week discussing the mistake and a blog post from David Fischer, vp of advertising and global operations, explaining how the metric should have reflected the total amount of time spent watching a clip divided by total number of people who watched it. Instead, the faulty metric showed the total time divided by views of videos. In a blog post, ANA president and CEO Bob Liodice, wrote, "While ANA recognizes that 'mistakes do happen,' we also recognize that Facebook has not yet achieved the level of measurement transparency that marketers need and require." The trade organization's specific concern is that Facebook metrics are not vetted by the Media Rating Council—the industry watchdog that creates standards for advertisers to buy media against. Unlike other publishers and media companies, Facebook's so-called walled garden limits the amount of data that brands have into their campaigns, and the company has held back on giving third parties significant access into the platform, meaning that brands have to rely heavily on Facebook for insight into their campaigns. "With more than $6 billion of marketers' media being directed to Facebook, we believe that it is time for them—and other such major media players—to be audited and accredited. That is the standard of accepted practice that marketers and agencies have relied on for decades," Liodice wrote. "Internal viewability measurements employed by digital media owners should not be used for the purposes of conducting outside commerce." Liodice also cited an ANA report from last year that found that 97 percent of marketers think their ad inventory should be measured by a third party

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Microsoft’s Kathleen Hall Explains How Its Marketing Went From Bad to Clio’s Advertiser of the Year

September 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Microsoft has done some truly innovative work this year, and at tonight's 2016 Clio Awards at the Museum of Natural History in New York, the brand will be honored with the Advertiser of the Year award, which is presented to the advertiser that receives the most overall Clio statue points for entries submitted across all medium types. Two campaigns that caught the Clio judges' attention, in particular, were Survival Billboard, an outdoor campaign from McCann London to promote the launch of Rise of the Tomb Raider on Xbox in the U.K., and the Microsoft Xbox Visualizer, a futuristic Halo promotion from twofifteenmccann. Survival Billboard put eight real people atop a billboard and subjected them to various weather elements like snow and rain, as voted on by the public, in a contest to see who would be left standing. The livestreamed survival challenge, which lasted 20 hours and 45 minutes, garnered 3.5 million views in one day. The Microsoft Xbox Visualizer campaign showed people's social media conversations about Halo in real time on a pixelated Halo helmet, with fan reaction including art and video, and had 4.4 million total engagements.

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How the Unlikely Alliance of Ovation’s ‘Versailles’ and Fiat Benefits Both Brands

September 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There's a sexy, lavish new series coming to cable TV, set in the 17th century, that brings a distinctly modern style to the story of King Louis XIV and his royal court outside Paris. But as contemporary as Versailles may be, don't expect the Sun King to hop behind the wheel of a Fiat , though the brand is the exclusive auto partner for the 10-episode show airing on the Ovation network . The partnership between period piece and marketer is playing out in branded content and behind-the-scenes vignettes that weave together the attributes of both, with nary an in-show product placement. It's part of a trend on television where fantasy, sci-fi, period, animation and unscripted series are increasingly creating what might on the surface seem to be unlikely pairings with brands. For Versailles, which centers on the 28-year-old French ruler and his impossibly beautiful courtiers, there's a focus on design, art and fashion, along with the obligatory palace intrigue, backstabbing and bed-hopping. (Think The Tudors with less gore.) "Even though it's a period piece, there's nothing stodgy about it," said Liz Janneman, Ovation's evp, network strategy. "It's a fashion-forward modern classic with a twist for a cultured audience." As it happens, Fiat sees itself the same way, with the partners collaborating on nearly 100 pieces of content that promote both the show and the carmaker's new 500X crossover sports utility vehicle. Those will include exclusive set visits, deep dives with show creators and historical perspectives, but no Fiats ferrying corseted characters. The alliance with Fiat, which is also sponsoring the limited-commercial, two-hour premiere on Oct. 1, isn't about "the literal connection" but the thematic one, Janneman said. Putting two such bedfellows together is "more challenging, but the result is more interesting," she said. Versailles is one of many such examples where marketers might have thought there was no room for them but found instead, via some creative thinking, that even surreal-world shows can include brands. These are what Kevin McAuliffe, branded content veteran who now heads Francis Productions, calls "contextual opportunities" that match a TV property and a brand with "similar belief systems." He said, "It's been an evolution, but brands are less about integration now and more about connecting with a message. You're driving value instead of just being exposed." Geico has used costume-clad marauding men to intentionally comic effect for its recent ties to History's action drama, Vikings, and Fitbit chose an appropriately creepy zombie theme for its link with AMC's massive hit, The Walking Dead. Ford sidled up to The CW's time-traveling superhero show, DC's Legends of Tomorrow, and Fox's comic-based Gotham with commercials and digital shorts featuring the series' actors. The marriage doesn't even have to be within the same species or galaxy, said Marc DeBevoise, CBS Interactive president and COO, who noted that he's considering contemporary brands as partners for the upcoming Star Trek: Discovery. Or it could be closer to home.

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