Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

Google’s Ad Revenue Hits $19 Billion, Even as Mobile Continues to Pose Challenges

July 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Google is still the primary moneymaker for parent company Alphabet. During the second quarter of 2016, Alphabet's revenue hit $21.5 billion, a 21 percent year-over-year increase. Of that revenue, $19.1 billion came from Google's advertising business, up from $16 billion a year ago. Even as consumers shift toward mobile, Google has struggled to make more money from smartphone-size ads that are typically priced less than desktop ads. During Thursday's earnings call, Google said cost per click was down 7 percent from last year. Meanwhile, aggregate clicks on paid ads increased 29 percent from the second quarter of 2015. And Google saw a 37 percent year-over-year jump in paid clicks on its websites.

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Despite Streaming Options, Millennial Women Plan to Watch the Olympics on TV

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The 2016 Summer Olympics are just a few weeks away, and it looks like the TV-friendly time zone of the host city, Rio de Janeiro, will pay big dividends for NBC. With Rio just one hour ahead of the East Coast, NBC Sports executives have consistently said these games will feature the most live coverage for any Olympics that NBC has been a part of. Despite the digitally-charged media ecosystem that NBC finds itself entrenched in—for the third Olympics in row, NBC will offer every event outside of the opening ceremonies live for digital consumption— it appears that at least one audience demographic is ready to watch the games the old fashioned way, and it's not one most would've expected. Influenster , whose 2 million members are comprised mostly of millennial women, surveyed 3,992 women around the age of 25 to find out their viewing habits for the upcoming games. The product discovery and reviews platform found that the overwhelming majority of millennial women that plan to watch the Olympics will do so in front of the television (75 percent) instead of livestreaming the competition (18 percent). Overall, more than half (54 percent) of millennial women surveyed are planning to watch any coverage from Rio. Airing on a tape delay hasn't hampered NBC's ability to pull in gigantic ratings—NBC averaged north of 30 million viewers for its primetime coverage from London in 2012. In fact, Jim Bell, NBC's executive producer for its Olympics coverage, has argued that the decision to make every sport live on a digital platform has actually increased TV viewership. "By providing more content you got more viewers and more interest, it was the rising tide that lifted all boats," he said during a Paley Center for Media event last month. But for NBC, being able to have big-ticket Olympic sports like swimming, diving, track and field, beach volleyball and gymnastics airing in the moment instead of on a delay should only further boost viewership. It should come as no surprise then that many of the American athletes that millennial women are most aware of, or at least the ones they follow on social media, participate in those major events. Of the 57 percent of those who took part in the survey, Michael Phelps (15 percent) and Gabby Douglas (14 percent) were the top two U.S. athletes followed

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How eBay Crafts Its Social Ads to Target Both Geeky Guys and Fashionistas

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Over the past few years, it's become increasingly hard for social marketers to pick which sites and platforms are worth their time and investment and which ones are passing fads (R.I.P. Peach and Yo ). For eBay, its social strategy spans 16 social networks and includes the usual mix of big platforms including Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. But the brand is also putting big money and resources behind smaller, niche sites such as Imgur, We Heart It, Tango and Reddit that target specific audiences. "The ecosystem is fragmented," said Llibert Argerich, global director of social and content at eBay. "There are more and more platforms that cater to more and more specific audiences. Those platforms are fragmented, but they're still very big." Photo-based Imgur, for instance, is geared towards geeky millennial guys and pulls in more than 150 million monthly active users. Meanwhile, female-focused social platform We Heart It hones in on women interested in fashion and lifestyle content, and has more than 40 million users. "I didn't know Imgur 18 months ago," Argerich said. Then in July 2015, eBay ran one of the first promoted posts on Imgur, an online community notoriously averse to advertising. The ad promoted drones and explained the differences between the different types. It generated more than 800 comments. Surprisingly, users weren't turned off from the ads. "We started getting people saying, 'Wow. It's amazing

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Zipcar Can Now Track How Many People See Its Rolling Ad Campaign in Seattle and D.C.

July 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Zipcar is rolling out a campaign in Seattle and Washington D.C. that blends an old-school advertising technique with new technology—it's wrapping ads around cars and tracking how many people see them. The company partnered with Wrapify , a San Diego startup that pays drivers to cover their cars with branding and data-tracking technology. Each car is equipped with sensors that feed live analytics to clients so they can see where their ads appear on the road, and how many people can see them. (Wrapify uses telemetry data from the car to track drivers' real-time location on a map, and pairs it with anonymized data from other sources to understand how many cars nearby see the message.) Think about it as a new way to drive offline traffic. "At Zipcar, we utilize a variety of innovative marketing strategies to reach potential members who are interested in joining a mobility solution that fits their lifestyle," a Zipcar spokeswoman said. "In addition to robust digital, content and field marketing programs, Zipcar is currently testing Wrapify in select markets to complement our out-of-home advertising." Wrapify founder and CEO James Heller sees his service as a bridge between out-of-home advertising and digital marketing. "When I looked at the out-of-home industry and the way it's measured and tracked in terms of impressions or attribution or anything, it's really a shot in the dark and a pay to play," he said. Wrapify, founded last year, is quickly expanding. The company recently opened a New York office, with 35,000 drivers signed up across 10 U.S. cities. Drivers are often paid between $400 and $600 a month, depending on the campaign length, mileage and how much of the car is wrapped. Here's a video from Wrapify that explains how it works: Wrapify even measures offline reach with CPMs, much like tech giants Facebook and Twitter do online. A recent case study conducted by Wrapify showed CPMs cost around $1 each. For one client, PetCo, 4,000 miles of driving logged nearly 8.8 million impressions at $1.13 eCPM (effective cost per mile). A campaign for TriNet that totaled 24,000 campaign miles delivered 66.5 million impressions with an eCPM of $1.08. Heller wouldn't provide details on the exact cost of the campaign but said on average, a 25-car campaign on the road for 12 weeks would cost about $1,600 per car, per month

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Twitter Tests ‘Recommended Video’ Feature During National Shooting Coverage

July 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers have flooded Twitter with video clips this week as they cover police shootings of civilians in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a shooting in Dallas Thursday night that killed five police officers. To help viewers stay informed, Twitter has quietly rolled out a recommended video feature that groups similar clips together, much like Facebook's suggested video feature. The videos autoplay silently in Twitter newsfeeds. When users click on a clip, the sound comes on and a landing page appears with more videos at the bottom. Here's what clicking on a clip from ABC News looked like this morning: Twitter did not immediately reply to press inquiries, but the move underscores the growing importance of social video in covering—and learning about—national tragedies. Recommended videos are only running in Twitter's iPhone app, and only appear when users click on clips directly from the newsfeed. They look similar to a feature Facebook rolled out last year called suggested video that bundles clips and ads into a stream. Similar to YouTube's revenue sharing program, Facebook gives publishers 55 percent of the revenue made from those ads. At the time of press, ads were not appearing in Twitter's recommended video player.

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KitchenAid Brings Aspen’s Food & Wine Classic to Your Home

June 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you're not one of the 5,000 food fans attending this year's sold-out Food & Wine Classic in Aspen, KitchenAid is bringing the culinary world's preeminent event to you. This afternoon, the home appliance brand, which has a 30-year relationship with the annual festival, will launch "Have Dinner With Us," employing Facebook Live and other social content to enable anyone to follow along with cooking demos by headlining chefs in Aspen and to get additional information about recipes, techniques and shopping. This is the first time live video has been produced at the event, founded in 1983. Beyond Facebook, content can be found at the websites of KitchenAid and Food & Wine and via both brands' other social channels. Food & Wine and KitchenAid have a potent social following, with more than 2 million total fans on Facebook and 1.5 million via Instagram. The activation is in partnership with Chris Cosentino, winner of Top Chef Masters, a frequent guest on Iron Chef America and chef/owner of Cockscomb in San Francisco. "This is the quintessential food event in the world," Bill Beck, vp, brand marketing at KitchenAid, told Adweek at the Classic.

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Instagram Ads Now Include Mobile Banners

June 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Slowly but surely, Instagram is turning into a direct-response platform for brands, and now calls-to-action look a little bit more like banner ads than highly styled and edited posts. The Facebook-owned app is rolling out a feature that links ads to profile pages so that when someone clicks on an ad from the news feed, a banner pops up at the bottom of the screen. The banner prompts people to take an action, like to visit a website or download an app. Clicking on the banner pulls up a website within Instagram. Here is how the experience looks from clicking on an ad. According to an Instagram rep, so-called "profile taps" will be included in click reporting for advertisers and are rolling out internationally. In a statement, Instagram said, "We found that Instagrammers were routinely tapping on a company's name from a direct response ad to learn more. Now when that happens, the call-to-action button from that same ad extends to the company's profile page to make it easier for people to discover a business they care about." The call-to-action is Instagram's latest step in turning the mobile app into a direct response channel for marketers since opening up its API last year

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Google Beats Out Apple as the World’s Most Valuable Company at $229 Billion

June 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Alphabet—Google's holding company—is also the world's most valuable alpha dog. Today, Millward Brown and WPP released their annual BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands, which tracks the worth of the world's top brands. According to BrandZ, Alphabet leads the pack because of Google's growth in advertising money, growth in its cloud business and the company's constant innovations. It's the second time the company has topped BrandZ's list in the past three years, after fighting Apple for the No. 1 slot. According to BrandZ, Google's value hit $229 billion this year (up 29 percent year-over-year) while Apple's value dipped 8 percent to $228 billion. Just two weeks ago, a separate report from media buying firm Zenith Media pegged Google as the world's biggest media player, controlling $60 billion in ad spend in the U.S. alone

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How Food & Wine’s New Editor Is Bringing Her Own Flavor to the Brand

June 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Editor of Food & Wine Previous gig Director of inspiration for Conrad Hotels Age 45 Twitter @NilouMotamed Adweek: Food & Wine's last editor, Dana Cowin, had been with the brand for more than two decades when she stepped down earlier this year. What's it like stepping into her shoes? Nilou Motamed: Dana left the brand in great shape. I would say that there's been really a seismic shift in how editors work. Perhaps when Dana became editor, and until recently, you were more of a magazine editor. But I think that one shift as I go forward is having the entire brand under my purview and collaborating really closely with our publisher. What are you bringing to Food & Wine that's new and different? I'm of international descent—I grew up in Iran and in Paris and the U.S.—and I'm a big traveler, so that's certainly important to me. We've always done travel at Food & Wine, but I think we'll do more international travel, more food destinations through the lens of travel. Perhaps because we do so many recipes, we've spent a lot of time focusing inside of the home, but as the Food & Wine lifestyle evolves, it really transcends just being at home and cooking and becomes the lens through which you look at the world, so I want to showcase that more clearly. That means more narratives, more voices. In our September and October issues, we'll have [food writer] Francis Lam and Lauren Collins from The New Yorker. Over the past few years, Time Inc.

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Publisher Reach on Facebook Is Down 42%

June 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers who have noticed their overall reach on Facebook has dramatically declined over the past few months can at least have peace of mind that they're not alone. According to an analysis by SocialFlow, publishers on Facebook have experienced a rapid decline in overall reach during the past few months. The social analytics company examined 3,000 Facebook pages, most of which are publishers who have a collective annual impression count of around 500 billion reaching 600 million unique users. And what it found might be a bit depressing to all the hard working journalists of the world: In May, publishers produced around 550,000 posts that went through SocialFlow's platform—up from 470,000 in April—but overall reach from January to May was down 42 percent per post. That's a "pretty notable drop," said SocialFlow CEO Jim Anderson. "We said, wait a minute, if the reach is staying flat but the posts are going up, the only possible conclusion there is that my reach per post is going down," he said in an interview.

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