Posts Tagged ‘enterprise’

Juniper Profit Surges as Revenue Climbs

October 22, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Juniper Networks Inc.’s third-quarter profit more than quadrupled as the network-gear company recorded an uptick in revenue and lower expenses. Juniper — along with rival F5 Networks Inc., which reports third-quarter results Wednesday — reported signs of weaker demand earlier this year. Juniper on Tuesday, however, suggested that markets are improving, with Chief Executive Kevin Johnson saying the company continues to see strong demand from its service-provider customers and is gaining traction in enterprise sectors. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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Managing Platforms Is a Human Art

October 21, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Image copyright Pictofigo In March 2012, I left the suburban enclaves of San Jose and went on safari to Kenya. Early in the trip I toured the Ngorongoro crater, filled with African lions, rhinos, hippos and giraffes. But my favorites were the monkeys. I loved Curious George as a boy. Seeing George’s real cousins, I asked our tour guide, “Can I give a banana to the monkey?” I had become the real-life Man with the Yellow Hat. The tour guide responded with an immediate and stern refusal, “Absolutely not.” He explained with a calm voice, “If you give a banana to a monkey you will destroy our ecosystem. You will teach monkeys to beg, and not forage, for food. You will pose danger to your fellow safari goers who might not have bananas to offer. And your action will cause other actions, for the plants, the wolves, the trees and everything else. You must not give a banana to the monkey.” He was right, and I knew it. Prior to visiting Kenya, I had managed the seller platform at eBay for over eleven years.

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SAP Profit Jumps but License Business Struggles

October 21, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

SAP AG, the world’s biggest business software maker, Monday reported a jump in third-quarter profit, but currency swings caused a slowdown in revenue growth and its core business in software licenses continued to slide as customers migrated to Web-based products. Net profit at the Walldorf, Germany-based company rose to €762 million ($1.04 billion) in the quarter ended Sept. 30, up 23 percent from a year earlier. But revenue increased just 2 percent to €4.05 billion, markedly slower than the 14 percent growth rate recorded a year earlier. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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Oracle Beats IBM to Become No. 2 Software Company by Revenue

October 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Here’s another interesting change coming in the wake of IBM’s disappointing earnings report on Wednesday : The size of its software business has slipped enough that it has ceased to be the second-largest software company in the world by revenue. That honor now apparently goes to software giant Oracle. Who says so? Oracle, naturally. It issued a press release Thursday night, claiming the second-place spot for itself. Given IBM’s recently announced quarterly results, we would like to take this opportunity to point out that Oracle’s software business has been growing faster than IBM’s software business and now Oracle has moved up to become the number two software company in the world while IBM has slipped to number three

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Global Internet Bodies Turn Their Backs on U.S. Oversight

October 11, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

A batch of the Internet’s oversight bodies have taken a strong stand against the long-term dominance by the U.S. in governing the operation of the Internet. At a meeting in Montevideo, Uruguay, the heads of ICANN, the Internet Engineering Task Force, the Internet Architecture Board, the World Wide Web Consortium and the Internet Society, backed by the heads of the regional registrars for global top-level domains, issued a statement calling for the “acceleration of the globalization” of the functions carried out by ICANN and IANA. The move is being seen more or less as a rejection of the current arrangement in which the day-to-day operations of the Internet’s underlying infrastructure have been supervised by the U.S. Department of Commerce . The arrangement was last extended in 2006. In the long term, this could turn out to be kind of a big deal, and it’s taking place against the backdrop of all the revelations about spying on the Internet by the U.S. National Security Agency based on revelations of documents leaked by Edward Snowden. But there’s more to it than that. The decision a few years back to allow for the creation of an essentially unlimited pool of top-level domains has been criticized around the world as primarily benefitting businesses, most of them U.S.-based. Writing for the Internet Governance Project , Milton Mueller, a Syracuse University professor , argued that the jarring rejection of the current scheme will likely result in a big administrative mess down the road, as the U.S. could have overseen a smoother transition to a global authority. Mueller has long argued that what’s needed in place of the current scheme is a set of international agreements governing how ICANN operates. “We have been urging the USG to end its privileged role and complete the privatization of the DNS management for nearly ten years

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Interoperability and Openness: Why an Open Cloud Is the Only Cloud for the Future

October 10, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Image copyright Ivo Pregelj Enterprise attitudes toward the cloud are changing; there is no doubt about that. Taking a look at Gartner’s recent cloud projections for the current $130bn industry, the largest growth areas in enterprise cloud spending are for Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), and cloud management and security, all critical business operations. Larger organizations are now prepared to utilize the cloud for far more than simply hosting email or non-critical applications, and it’s a sign that the cloud is coming of age. Despite the trend toward cloud adoption, there is still debate around exactly what form it will take. One of the key reasons for moving to cloud infrastructure is the promise of agility that clouds are known to provide. Agility requires flexibility and so smart organizations are looking for cloud technologies that are going to give the greatest range of options. This is partly in response to the early days of cloud being dominated by largely closed, proprietary systems which could restrict the users both at a technical and a commercial level. Now, with more critical workloads moving to the cloud, organizations can’t feel comfortable entrusting their operations to a single vendor that potentially won’t meet all their needs for scalability, cost and other key factors. In fact, data and application portability are arguably more important to today’s enterprise than any specific technology, and, if organizations can’t move workloads in and out of clouds at will, they won’t want to use them. Further, as organizations of all stripes juggle more and more data volumes and rely on increasingly complex applications, the rate at which they must adopt new IT infrastructure components is becoming exponential. Enterprises with diverse and rapidly evolving technology needs can’t settle for a closed cloud deployment characterized by excessive vendor lock-in. Rather, they need a flexible model where cloud components from various vendors are highly interoperable, meaning they can work together seamlessly, so that best-of-breed solutions can be combined in a way that builds a cloud tailored to the organization’s unique business model. Open source technologies are particularly valuable here because of their customizability and relatively high compatibility with other solutions. An uptick in interoperability and openness among cloud vendors will ensure that vendor lock-in and closed ecosystems don’t strangle all the best business benefits out of the cloud: Cost efficiency, scalability, accessibility, reliability, etc. Additionally, interoperability supports the growing momentum of hybrid cloud strategies, which utilize any number of private and public cloud components that must be efficiently connected. These are all reasons why highly interoperable “open cloud” models, epitomized by the open source cloud platform OpenStack , are rapidly gaining ground among the myriad of startups, enterprises, telcos and service providers entering the cloud market today. It’s Not Public vs. Private Anymore In many ways, the shift to open clouds is intertwined with the shift to hybrid clouds. There has been much debate over whether private or public clouds will gain mainstream enterprise adoption, but it’s becoming clear that hybrid strategies utilizing both public and private clouds are, basically, the future.

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AllThingsD in The Media: Microsoft’s Next CEO (Maybe) and a New Video Chat App

October 6, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Another busy week of tech news — and when was the last time it wasn’t a busy week? — meant AllThingsD ‘s personnel was equally busy in the media this week. Early in the week, on Sept. 30, Kara Swisher was on CNBC to talk about the still-unfolding story about the possibility that Alan Mullaly, the current CEO of automaker Ford may be in line to replace Steve Ballmer as the next CEO of software giant Microsoft. Swisher was first to report the news that Mullaly is being considered for the job on Sept. 26. Also Walt Mossberg was on The Wall Street Journal’s Digits to talk about the new video chat app Spin. [ See post to watch video ]

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Nathan Myhrvold’s Intellectual Ventures Said to Be Hunting for New Capital

October 5, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Intellectual Ventures founder Nathan Myhrvold It appears that Intellectual Ventures, the controversial company founded on the idea that it could create a capital marketplace in patents, is having trouble raising money for a new fund. According to a Reuters report Thursday which cites sources familiar with the matter, I.V. has slowed down its purchasing of patents and is on the hunt for new sources of funding. Having raised about $6 billion since its founding in 2000, it has gathered up a portfolio of some 70,000 patents. The story said the firm is on the hunt for another $3 billion. One problem: Early investors, including Microsoft and Google, are taking a pass. Google in particular has been on the business end of I.V.-spawned lawsuits against its Motorola Mobility unit. Most of those cases began before Google owned Motorola, but I.V. sued again in June. As it happens, I.V. had a busy summer. It raised its profile in Washington, D.C., boosting its spending on lobbyists against the backdrop of an increase in White House interest in crafting policies meant to regulate patent-trading firms. And last month it struck a licensing deal with Nest , the smart thermostat company. Founder Nathan Myhrvold, a former Microsoft CTO, likes to describe his business model as “invention capital.” Others, namely Google, have labeled I.V. a “patent troll.” And as Myhrvold readily acknowledged in an unapologetic interview with Walt Mossberg at the tenth D: All Things Digital conference in 2012, he’s never going to be the popular kid in the class. Here’s the video of that interview, which in light of I.V.’s reported troubles, bears watching again. [ See post to watch video ]

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Database Company MongoDB Raises $150M to Chip Away at Oracle

October 5, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Fast-growing Internet database company MongoDB Inc. has raised $150 million in what the company says is the largest funding round ever for a database company. The financing valued the company at more than $1 billion, according to a person familiar with the deal. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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Why the NSA Hates Tor, the Network That Protects Internet Anonymity

October 4, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

If you know anything about it, then it probably doesn’t come as much of a surprise that the National Security Agency really dislikes Tor, a.k.a. The Onion Router. As I described yesterday, Tor is an open-source network that provides people connected to it a pretty strong, though not perfect, method for browsing the Internet anonymously. You have to be using it in order to access the so-called “Dark Web ,” which is where Silk Road, the online bazaar of illicit drugs and other things, existed until its operator was arrested in San Francisco on Wednesday . The case has cast new attention on both the Dark Web and on Tor itself. Given its roots as a project born at the U.S. Naval Academy, it’s a tad ironic that the NSA dislikes it so much, but it’s pretty clear from a slide deck on the subject leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and published by The Guardian today that its opinion is clear. The title of the deck is “Tor Stinks.” The presentation shows that the agency struggled to defeat the anonymity that Tor provides. As of the time of the presentation, which is dated June of 2012, it hadn’t had much luck

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