Posts Tagged ‘digital’

China’s Regulators Target Reality Shows in Latest TV Cleanup

July 24, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

China’s media regulators have openly criticized the country’s TV content and unveiled tougher rules for reality TV shows.

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Nikkei Sees Global, Digital Expansion at Core of $1.3 Billion Financial Times Deal

July 24, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Nikkei Inc. sees acquisition as major step in the internationalization and digitization strategy that it has already been pursuing.

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Japan TV Networks to Launch TVer Online Video Platform

July 20, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Japan’s five top commercial TV networks will jointly launch a service to stream their new shows on the Internet, starting in October.

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SoftBank Puts Video Site DramaFever up for Sale Again, say Reports

July 20, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

DramaFever, the online vide site known for its Korean dramas, is up for sale a year after it was acquired by SoftBank, according to reports.

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Nintendo Boss Iwata Satoru Dead At 55

July 13, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Iwata Satoru, the hugely popular president of Japanese games giant, has died of cancer, age 55.

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Eight Reasons Why Netflix Will Struggle In China

June 17, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Subscriber data from iQIYI and Alibaba's plan to enrich its Internet Plus roster underline the obstacles to penetrating China's SVoD market

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Why Networks Are Going for Broke This Summer

May 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For decades, the broadcast networks took the idea of summer vacation quite literally—programming reruns and other filler content from June through mid-September, much to the frustration of advertisers. Those days are finally over, as broadcasters follow the lead of cable and, more recently, Netflix, by packing their summer slates with big series presented in unique ways that help audiences more easily consume content and aid advertisers in reaching viewers. "Summer is a critical time period for so many advertisers: back-to-school, retail, summer movies," noted Darcy Bowe, vp, media director at Starcom. "You really want to get your message out there, but because the broadcasters weren't programming anything new, people were trained not to watch TV in the summer." NBC is the first broadcaster to pull a Netflix with the May 28 debut of limited series Aquarius, starring David Duchovny. Immediately after the network premiere, the entire 13-episode series will be available to stream at NBC's website, on its mobile app and via other VOD platforms. The network will continue to air new episodes each week, but audiences can choose to binge on the entire series at once. Meanwhile, CBS has partnered with Netflix for its big summer premiere, Zoo, which will stream on the service as soon as its CBS run has concluded. Cable is also trying a nonlinear approach to summer programming. USA comedy Playing House returns for Season 2 in August with a VOD windowing strategy. Each episode will be made available on VOD one week before it airs on the network, with creator/stars Lennon Parham and Jessica St. Clair partnering with advertisers to create customized content. "If you have Toyota or one of our other sponsors in there, you'll be able to create content that's about Playing House but also about the sponsor as well," said Chris McCumber, USA's president. Because these shows are airing outside the September-to-May TV season, broadcasters have the flexibility to experiment without affecting the traditional fall schedule. Robert Greenblatt, NBC Entertainment chairman, said his network was able to stream Aquarius in full (the ad load of the linear broadcast will mirror that of VOD) because production on the entire season had already wrapped—unlike with most broadcast production schedules, which are only a few weeks ahead of an episode's airdate. Thanks to CBS' deal with Netflix, Zoo (based on the James Patterson novel) will be profitable before the drama even debuts on June 30. That gives the network a safety net as it attempts to lure a different audience during the summer months. Like CBS summer series Under the Dome and Extant, "Zoo is a big, epic-looking and feeling show," said CBS Entertainment chair Nina Tassler. "And they're all highly serialized. We don't do that during the regular season, so summer allows us to recruit new viewers and bring them into fall." While USA routinely airs series during the summer, "we've always seen August as an opportunity because it feels like there's a little bit of a dead space there," said McCumber. "So we thought it would be a great space to put Playing House where it will get more attention … and on top of that create a new opportunity for advertisers to come in and sell it in a different way." Advertisers worry whether digital platforms will cannibalize viewership on terrestrial television

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Live-Streaming for Movie Theaters Moving Forward via DCDC

April 20, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The Digital Cinema Distribution Coalition — founded by Warner Bros., Universal Pictures, Regal Entertainment Group, Cinemark Theatres and AMC Theatres — has developed what it’s touting as a high-quality live-streaming technology solution. The new system, which will be unveiled at CinemaCon at Caesars Palace this week, allows the DCDC KenCast catch server to stream live... Read more

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Youku Tudou Deals to Accelerate Web to Film Development

April 20, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Online video giant speeds up migration of popular web content through series of corporate partnerships

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Crackle Taps Dennis Quaid, Bryan Cranston for New Shows

April 14, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the line between digital and linear programming blurs, Crackle doesn't want to be seen just as a brand's online ad option. It also doesn't want to be just another video site. "We have a giant garbage can called YouTube for all that user generated content," joked Crackle's No. 1 star Jerry Seinfeld at the Sony network's first Upfront presentation Tuesday in New York. Ditching the digital-centric NewFronts , Crackle presented a slate of original programming backed by guarantees of reliable measurement. "What it's really about is reaching new desirable audiences," Crackle's general manager and evp Eric Berger said. Berger emphasized that audiences can expect premium content whenever they load its channel. From the sixth season of Seinfeld's Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, to Joe Dirt 2: Beautiful Loser -- the first digital sequel of a major motion picture -- six new shows were announced including: The Art of More, Crackle's first hour-long scripted drama starring Dennis Quaid -- fresh from his was-it-or-wasn't-it a meltdown? -- and Kate Bosworth launches later this year. Half-hour thriller Chosen which will be extended into an hour-long series. Coming this fall, SuperMansion, created by Seth Green and the team at Stoopid Buddy Studios, known for their work on Robot Chicken. Emmy-award winning actor Bryan Cranston will lend his voice to the project. "For ten years we've made TV with Turner, and now we're excited to do it for Crackle," Green said. To further reiterate that it's not just an online network, Crackle announced plans to revitalize its interface. With a new "always on" experience, powered by Adobe Primetime, scheduled content will start streaming as soon as the Crackle player launches, just like a TV show would be airing when a TV is turned on. Users can opt to restart the program, continue to watch what is airing, or browse through a channel guide to find something to their liking. There's the traditional pre-roll, post-roll and sponsorship opportunities. But unlike broadcast and cable networks that generally only offer spots on shows, Crackle lets advertisers create native content, giving brands access to its production studio. Programming will be measured by Nielsen's Total Audience measurement, which claims to be able to track viewers across screens. Crackle found a recent campaign with MillerCoors produced a 216 percent lift, with 100 percent viewability and 96 percent completion

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