Posts Tagged ‘digital’

European Union Mulls 20% Content Quota for Netflix and Amazon Prime

May 19, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The European Commission, the European Union’s executive arm, is mulling a move to impose a 20% European content quota on video streaming sites like Netflix and Amazon Prime. More to follow.

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How Moleskine Went From Parisian Scribble Pad to Global Icon

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Lin-Manuel Miranda worked for six years to get his Grammy- and Pulitzer-winning musical Hamilton from his head onto a stage. He worked on the songs everywhere—on his honeymoon, on the subway—and, as the lyrics came to him, he committed them to a Moleskine notebook. Photo: Nick Ferrari; Parts Model: Body by Braha "Moleskine is an iconic object, with a very contemporary design, with only a slight retro look," said Arrigo Berni, CEO, Moleskine. "It connects the owner to a community of passionate users, past and present. It is a signifier." He's not kidding. The Moleskine notebook, though around in its present form only since 1997, represents the continuation of a literary and artistic lineage

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Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Takes Stake in Apple Worth More Than $1 Billion

May 16, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway has revealed it has taken a stake in Apple valued at more than $1 billion. Berkshire Hathaway said in a regulatory filing Monday that it has held 9.81 million shares in the iPhone manufacturer since March 31. More to follow.

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Why Big Digital Video and TV Networks Are Increasingly Becoming Production Partners

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Television its dead—long live television. That could become the unofficial motto, or at least the crawl at the bottom of the screen, to explain the recent flurry of hookups between digital players like BuzzFeed, Vice and Mashable with old-guard media companies such as NBCUniversal, Disney and Turner Broadcasting. While BuzzFeed can get 800,000 people to watch a watermelon explode —live on Facebook—and YouTube claims to reach more consumers 18-49 than any TV network, the digital world obviously thinks TV still has its charms. Hint: massive reach and enviable ad dollars from blue-chip brands. Though it's not the only reason for the current wave of mergers, acquisitions and investment, TV is a driving force for the nascent relationships blurring the line between linear and digital and introducing sexy young things to a platform that is the very definition of old media. "Linear TV is vulnerable, yes, but it's still a monster ," notes media analyst David Deal of David J. Deal Consulting. "And it's not going away." At least one much-sought-after digital darling not only believes this is the case but is making TV a top priority. Vice Media CEO Shane Smith announced the same week as its Digital NewFronts presentation this month that the fast-growing media company known for its grit and swagger is joining forces with ESPN to share, co-create and co-promote sports programming across multiple venues, as part of an overall relationship with Disney. Pillars of the alliance include the award-winning 30 for 30 documentaries from the sports powerhouse telecast on Viceland , Vice's new 24-hour cable network, and Vice's in-your-face-style series on ESPN. "I applaud Shane for understanding that television is the smartest path to worldwide leadership," ESPN president John Skipper was quoted as saying, with just the slightest wink, in Adweek's coverage of the recent NewFronts .

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Why AwesomenessTV is Telling Marketers to Stop Putting Gen Z and Millennials in One Group

May 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

"Gen Z and millennials is not a thing, they're two things," exclaimed AwesomenessTV CEO Brian Robbins during the MCN's NewFront presentation Wednesday evening. "These life stages – late teens who are breaking away from freedom vs. these young adult couples are very, very different." And unlike most other digital players, AwesomenessTV puts more emphasis on reaching the teens and tweens of Gen Z. "They're loaded," he quipped, which came as a surprise to many in the audience at Tribeca's Spring Studios. "First of all, they have their parents money... just ask my kids." Robbins added that, unlike millennials who are only a few years out of college, Gen Zers don't have student loan debt. To that end, AwesomenessTV will become the first to partner with messaging app Kik, launching a bot that combines native video and chat. In the near future, character bots will launch for AwesomenessTV's scripted series and films to deliver companion narratives, behind-the-scenes features and alternative endings driven by audience participation. They also recently launched on Apple TV and will triple the amount of premium content on Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. AwesomenessTV is also working with a pair of technology companies to help brands reach Gen Z on those myriad platforms. "That private screen has become a personal concierge for an experience that is uniquely their own," said Robbins of Gen Z's mobile attachment. With video-data company ZEFR, AwesomenessTV will launch "Signal" a content and multi-platform distribution program that will enable custom content to be distributed via advertising across multiple platforms. AwesomenessTV is also using Brightline's proprietary technology for dynamic ad insertion for connected TVs and over-the-top platforms. "We are matching our storytelling prowess with innovative technology partnerships that will enable our brand partners to hyper target the hard to reach Gen Z audience wherever they are found," added Brett Bouttier, president AwesomenessTV. AwesomenessTV also announced new seasons for Royal Crush and Guidance, and a new series for Verizon's go90, t@gged, which has already been greenlit for a second season. Verizon acquired a 24.5 percent stake in AwesomenessTV last month. The MCN is also collaborating with Major League Baseball, which has been trying to appeal to younger viewers , on a scripted series. But the best announcement of the night was not actually an announcement at all.

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Snapchat Led the Way With Vertical Video. Will Virool Make It the New Standard?

May 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Not so long ago, it was taboo to turn horizontal video on its head, as marketers grappled with doing more for mobile than merely refitting TV spots for smaller screens. But today, vertical video, once seen as a Snapchat anomaly, is gaining traction and providing publishers and advertisers with perhaps another way to win over the ever-growing mobile audience—with some 163.7 million Americans owning smartphones by the end of this year, per eMarketer. Virool, a programmatic video distribution company, is planning a vertical video ad unit called Vertical Reveal. Using a portion of the $12 million in venture capital it recently raised, the San Francisco-based firm is betting on a format that, as Virool CEO Alex Debelov and many others have noted, best matches up with how we hold our mobile devices day-to-day. "We're excited because in the last 18 months, Snapchat has been a lone wolf in this fight, but we now have the opportunity to really make this the new standard," he said. "So our vision is that over the next year, this will become something you will see everywhere, and that will provide a much better advertiser and user experience." One of the first brands to sign on with Virool is DJI, a Chinese drone manufacturer that also recently started making handheld cameras. It will start running ads in the next few weeks, as Virool ramps up its vertical debut for the second quarter. Meanwhile, a European rollout is planned to coincide with the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in June. "We need to be in front of [users] in some way that's not intrusive—it isn't a banner, it isn't boring," said Gabe Chan, global director of digital brands at DJI. "So vertical video seems like a very logical choice to us and to any advertiser in digital marketing now." Rubicon Project will be the exclusive programmatic platform for Virool's new unit. "From everything that I'm seeing, we believe that there will be a lot of momentum behind this unit because of the way everyone is consuming and how marketers really want to capture that experience," said John Peragine, head of video at Rubicon Project

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Home Depot’s CMO Trish Mueller Resigns After 5 Years in the Top Marketing Role

April 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Trish Mueller has stepped down as chief marketing officer at Home Depot after nearly seven years with the Atlanta-based company. Director of corporate communications Stephen Holmes confirmed to Adweek today that Mueller announced her resignation approximately two weeks ago and that she has been replaced by president of online operations Kevin Hofmann, who will hold both titles. In a statement, Mueller said, "It was an honor and a privilege to work at The Home Depot as CMO for the past 5 years!" She added, "For now, I have decided to take some time off to consider what's next, but I will always 'bleed orange' and be grateful for working for, in my opinion, the best retailer in America." Mueller became vice president of advertising at Home Depot in 2009 after serving as svp of marketing and advertising at Sports Authority. She was promoted to CMO in 2011. Earlier in her career, she held similar positions at retailers including Montgomery Ward, ShopNBC and American Signature-Value City. She has also been an independent director on the board of Dave & Buster's since 2015. Hofmann joined the chain in 2006 as a vice president leading its technology teams with a focus on ecommerce, supply-chain transformation and international operations. He was later promoted to vp of Home Depot's installation division before being promoted again to lead all aspects of its online business in 2013. He previously spent a decade at GE in various leadership positions handling technology, social networking, business intelligence, renewable energy and other corporate functions after working for eight years in research, manufacturing and technology with Dow Chemical.

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Russell Simmons’ New Agency Will Help Brands Connect With Hip-Hop Fans

April 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, hip-hop impresario and Adweek Brand Visionary Russell Simmons launched an in-house creative agency to help brands appeal to young audiences in a new way. The new agency, ADHD, will serve as an in-house creative unit of All Def Digital (ADD), Simmons' web video platform and media company which manages a unit of social video stars, writers, actors and hip hop artists and has 1.4 million subscribers on YouTube. Both entities' acronyms are a nod to younger generations' shorter attention spans, Simmons told Adweek. "The idea was, if you don't have ADD, you're not paying attention," he said. The goal of ADHD is to appeal to the increasingly diverse hip-hop audience, which so far has been misunderstood by brands and by Hollywood, Simmons said. "No one really understands this audience.

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What’s Causing Vice’s Huge Fluctuations in Web Traffic?

April 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ever since Vice decided to get into the cable TV game, the self-assured digital news and lifestyle publisher has been under the microscope. That came blaringly to the fore last month when Variety reported that Vice's web traffic plunged in February. But after free-falling 17.4 percent, from 59.5 million unique visitors in January to 49.2 in February, Vice rebounded nearly all the way back in March, drawing 58.3 million uniques. So what caused Vice's huge fall—and subsequent Phoenix-like rise—the past two months? Ironically, it was smaller sites that Vice bundles with its own traffic in an effort to boost its overall numbers for sales purposes.

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How 4 Multichannel Networks Plan to Attract Millennial Viewers

April 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

By now, it's a given that millennials—some of them having cut the cord, others never having had a cord to cut—are consuming an unprecedented crush of video content on a growing array of platforms and devices. And while appointment viewing is largely a thing of the past, it is also accepted that the bond that audiences, notably younger ones, have forged with content creators found on YouTube, Vine, Instagram and beyond is infinitely more unbreakable than their parents' affinity for the likes of, say, Jerry Seinfeld or the cast of Melrose Place or any other TV star from the past you'd care to name. Multichannel networks, built on the power and reach of YouTube and serving as a bridge between creators and brands craving to reach this base of young, hard-core fans, now constitute a 5-year-old ecosystem, one that finds itself all grown-up and yet as always remains in search of the latest, greatest ways to produce and distribute high-quality content—and of course, the next big video star. And their appeal goes way beyond the screen. Take Twaimz , one of the creators for network Fullscreen. Not only do his videos log millions of views, but his recent tour of the U.S. sold out 22 dates, says Fullscreen founder and CEO George Strompolos. "Why is this happening?" he asks. "He has caught the hearts and minds of an audience." On the eve of the annual Digital Content NewFronts where the freshest programming ideas will get pitched and some $3 billion in ad business will be up for grabs, Adweek caught up with Strompolos and top executives from Maker Studios , Defy Media and Studio71 (formerly Collective Digital Studio) to learn about the issues they face as they chase coveted millennial consumers and talent, and all those advertiser dollars. What would you say is the biggest issue you face heading into the NewFronts? George Strompolos: [Millennials] are watching less and less TV every year, but that doesn't mean that they're not consuming entertainment. If you're an advertiser that's used to spending all this money to reach customers and sell products, you're kind of scratching your head and saying, "Where do I belong?" It's our job to translate that and make it easier for a marketer to reach a customer in those new ways

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