Posts Tagged ‘digital’

Here’s How Olympic Advertisers Are Divvying Up Spend Across Digital and TV

August 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

According to data from MediaRadar, 482 advertisers have run TV ads during the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, with 349 of those brands also running digital display advertising. MediaRadar used data from NBC and aggregated stats from 6,000 websites to crunch numbers from Aug. 1 through Aug. 15. For digital ad buys, the company measures factors like ad type, location, density on the page, media format and frequency to create a metric dubbed a Digital Placement Score. The metric is intended to help compare spend across differing ad sizes and shapes that individual websites and publishers often offer. Video and native ad campaigns, for example, score higher than standard display or banner campaigns. In terms of quantity, DirecTV leads with a total of 19 digital and TV campaigns, with a big chunk of digital dollars supporting the DirecTV NFL Sunday Ticket streaming initiative. The media buy for DirecTV NFL Sunday Ticket includes ads on 30 websites—giving the brand a score of 4,315—while another ad buy for a separate campaign across 45 websites yielded a score of 1,495

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How This Charity Used a Loophole on Mobile Payment App Venmo to Raise Money

July 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's no surprise that nonprofits operate on shoestring-sized budgets and are constantly working to recruit a new generation of millennial donors. But Water is Life, a charity focused on providing clean water resources, found an interesting way to hack the popular mobile payment app Venmo, which could open the floodgates to creative and stealthy digital marketing from other nonprofits. Last week, the charity teamed up with Deutsch New York to zero in on millennials who use peer-to-peer app Venmo to send each other money. But there was a problem: Venmo doesn't let brands advertise on the app—likely because seeing a flood of ads alongside credit card statements would scare off its users. So, the charity and agency Deutsch found a tiny workaround by keeping a close eye on the app's global news feed, a feature that shows real-time public transactions between Venmo users. Starting on the Fourth of July—a high-traffic time on the app when millennials are paying their friends back for things like beer and food—Deutsch began sending personalized ads disguised as payments to folks who publicized their payments. The team sent each user a 1 cent payment attached to a 2,000-character message tailored to what they recently paid for. For example, the copy sent to someone who recently charged a friend for a beer may have read, "1 cent can't pay someone back for a beer, but it can help buy someone clean water for a day." At the bottom of the message, a call-to-action prompted consumers to donate to Water Is Life by going to a website. Once the tiny payment was sent, the message appeared in the user's news feed where all of their friends could see it, too

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Inside ‘The Next Rembrandt': How JWT Got a Computer to Paint Like the Old Master

June 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—Rembrandt van Rijn finished his last painting in 1669, the year he died. So it was enthralling, and a little unsettling, to step on to a boat at the Cannes Lions festival for a private viewing of the first new Rembrandt in 347 years. In a fascinating merging of creativity and technology, the humans at J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam taught a computer to paint like Rembrandt by having it study the old master's works for months. The resulting painting is a completely new portrait, not a replica, and it's indistinguishable—to my eye, at least—from the real thing.

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What Lies Ahead for Gawker Now that a Tech Billionaire Is Bankrolling Lawsuits Against It?

May 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you thought the Gawker saga would slow down as we creep closer to Memorial Day weekend, you thought wrong. Following a dizzying 24 hours that ended with Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel admitting outright that he's been bankrolling multiple lawsuits against the media company, the discussion now turns to Gawker CEO Nick Denton and his ability to withstand all of these costly lawsuits. Though Gawker was dealt another loss on Wednesday when a Florida judge upheld the jury's decision to award Hulk Hogan some $140 million over Gawker's publishing of a sex tape in 2012, the company plans to appeal. Despite Gawker's insistence that it will get the verdict overturned—the judge in the case is the most overturned judge in Pinellas County over the past four years—the company is still incurring a hefty legal price tag for a process that could take months. And for Thiel, who is going after Gawker over some not-so-nice stories written about him, bleeding the company dry could be just as important as Hogan's right to privacy. "Gawker could be in a very perilous financial situation," Ryan Skinner, a senior analyst at Forrester, told Adweek. "They need to explore different ways of trying to secure the business going forward." And that's exactly what Gawker has been doing. A pair of reports from the New York Post and Wall Street Journal set off alarms when the outlets revealed that Denton has been quietly soliciting bids for a potential sale of the company, in the event that he either has to pay the $140 million or the mountain of legal fees becomes too much.

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European Union Mulls 20% Content Quota for Netflix and Amazon Prime

May 19, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The European Commission, the European Union’s executive arm, is mulling a move to impose a 20% European content quota on video streaming sites like Netflix and Amazon Prime. More to follow.

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How Moleskine Went From Parisian Scribble Pad to Global Icon

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Lin-Manuel Miranda worked for six years to get his Grammy- and Pulitzer-winning musical Hamilton from his head onto a stage. He worked on the songs everywhere—on his honeymoon, on the subway—and, as the lyrics came to him, he committed them to a Moleskine notebook. Photo: Nick Ferrari; Parts Model: Body by Braha "Moleskine is an iconic object, with a very contemporary design, with only a slight retro look," said Arrigo Berni, CEO, Moleskine. "It connects the owner to a community of passionate users, past and present. It is a signifier." He's not kidding. The Moleskine notebook, though around in its present form only since 1997, represents the continuation of a literary and artistic lineage

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Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Takes Stake in Apple Worth More Than $1 Billion

May 16, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway has revealed it has taken a stake in Apple valued at more than $1 billion. Berkshire Hathaway said in a regulatory filing Monday that it has held 9.81 million shares in the iPhone manufacturer since March 31. More to follow.

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Why Big Digital Video and TV Networks Are Increasingly Becoming Production Partners

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Television its dead—long live television. That could become the unofficial motto, or at least the crawl at the bottom of the screen, to explain the recent flurry of hookups between digital players like BuzzFeed, Vice and Mashable with old-guard media companies such as NBCUniversal, Disney and Turner Broadcasting. While BuzzFeed can get 800,000 people to watch a watermelon explode —live on Facebook—and YouTube claims to reach more consumers 18-49 than any TV network, the digital world obviously thinks TV still has its charms. Hint: massive reach and enviable ad dollars from blue-chip brands. Though it's not the only reason for the current wave of mergers, acquisitions and investment, TV is a driving force for the nascent relationships blurring the line between linear and digital and introducing sexy young things to a platform that is the very definition of old media. "Linear TV is vulnerable, yes, but it's still a monster ," notes media analyst David Deal of David J. Deal Consulting. "And it's not going away." At least one much-sought-after digital darling not only believes this is the case but is making TV a top priority. Vice Media CEO Shane Smith announced the same week as its Digital NewFronts presentation this month that the fast-growing media company known for its grit and swagger is joining forces with ESPN to share, co-create and co-promote sports programming across multiple venues, as part of an overall relationship with Disney. Pillars of the alliance include the award-winning 30 for 30 documentaries from the sports powerhouse telecast on Viceland , Vice's new 24-hour cable network, and Vice's in-your-face-style series on ESPN. "I applaud Shane for understanding that television is the smartest path to worldwide leadership," ESPN president John Skipper was quoted as saying, with just the slightest wink, in Adweek's coverage of the recent NewFronts .

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Why AwesomenessTV is Telling Marketers to Stop Putting Gen Z and Millennials in One Group

May 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

"Gen Z and millennials is not a thing, they're two things," exclaimed AwesomenessTV CEO Brian Robbins during the MCN's NewFront presentation Wednesday evening. "These life stages – late teens who are breaking away from freedom vs. these young adult couples are very, very different." And unlike most other digital players, AwesomenessTV puts more emphasis on reaching the teens and tweens of Gen Z. "They're loaded," he quipped, which came as a surprise to many in the audience at Tribeca's Spring Studios. "First of all, they have their parents money... just ask my kids." Robbins added that, unlike millennials who are only a few years out of college, Gen Zers don't have student loan debt. To that end, AwesomenessTV will become the first to partner with messaging app Kik, launching a bot that combines native video and chat. In the near future, character bots will launch for AwesomenessTV's scripted series and films to deliver companion narratives, behind-the-scenes features and alternative endings driven by audience participation. They also recently launched on Apple TV and will triple the amount of premium content on Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat. AwesomenessTV is also working with a pair of technology companies to help brands reach Gen Z on those myriad platforms. "That private screen has become a personal concierge for an experience that is uniquely their own," said Robbins of Gen Z's mobile attachment. With video-data company ZEFR, AwesomenessTV will launch "Signal" a content and multi-platform distribution program that will enable custom content to be distributed via advertising across multiple platforms. AwesomenessTV is also using Brightline's proprietary technology for dynamic ad insertion for connected TVs and over-the-top platforms. "We are matching our storytelling prowess with innovative technology partnerships that will enable our brand partners to hyper target the hard to reach Gen Z audience wherever they are found," added Brett Bouttier, president AwesomenessTV. AwesomenessTV also announced new seasons for Royal Crush and Guidance, and a new series for Verizon's go90, t@gged, which has already been greenlit for a second season. Verizon acquired a 24.5 percent stake in AwesomenessTV last month. The MCN is also collaborating with Major League Baseball, which has been trying to appeal to younger viewers , on a scripted series. But the best announcement of the night was not actually an announcement at all.

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Snapchat Led the Way With Vertical Video. Will Virool Make It the New Standard?

May 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Not so long ago, it was taboo to turn horizontal video on its head, as marketers grappled with doing more for mobile than merely refitting TV spots for smaller screens. But today, vertical video, once seen as a Snapchat anomaly, is gaining traction and providing publishers and advertisers with perhaps another way to win over the ever-growing mobile audience—with some 163.7 million Americans owning smartphones by the end of this year, per eMarketer. Virool, a programmatic video distribution company, is planning a vertical video ad unit called Vertical Reveal. Using a portion of the $12 million in venture capital it recently raised, the San Francisco-based firm is betting on a format that, as Virool CEO Alex Debelov and many others have noted, best matches up with how we hold our mobile devices day-to-day. "We're excited because in the last 18 months, Snapchat has been a lone wolf in this fight, but we now have the opportunity to really make this the new standard," he said. "So our vision is that over the next year, this will become something you will see everywhere, and that will provide a much better advertiser and user experience." One of the first brands to sign on with Virool is DJI, a Chinese drone manufacturer that also recently started making handheld cameras. It will start running ads in the next few weeks, as Virool ramps up its vertical debut for the second quarter. Meanwhile, a European rollout is planned to coincide with the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in June. "We need to be in front of [users] in some way that's not intrusive—it isn't a banner, it isn't boring," said Gabe Chan, global director of digital brands at DJI. "So vertical video seems like a very logical choice to us and to any advertiser in digital marketing now." Rubicon Project will be the exclusive programmatic platform for Virool's new unit. "From everything that I'm seeing, we believe that there will be a lot of momentum behind this unit because of the way everyone is consuming and how marketers really want to capture that experience," said John Peragine, head of video at Rubicon Project

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