Posts Tagged ‘cbs’

Prime Time Ghost Town

October 28, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Better Off Dead: AMC Zombie Hit Tears Into Sunday Night

October 21, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Like the fence

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TV Network Time Slots Where Nothing Seems to Go Right

October 21, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

They’re scattered across the prime-time schedule like missing teeth in a jack-o’-lantern’s crooked grin—dead spots where nothing seems to prosper. Every network has at least one haunted time slot, one tumbledown chunk of real estate that defies development, and the longer they remain unsettled, the harder it is to draw viewers back. ABC is saddled with two of the most pernicious time slots on the broadcast schedule (Sunday nights at 10 p.m. and 8 p.m. Thursdays), while unrelenting pressure from CBS and a string of high-profile failures have made a ghost town of NBC’s once mighty Thursday lineup. While both networks have enjoyed big wins on other nights—ABC’s Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (3.4) and NBC’s The Blacklist (3.3) are the season’s two highest-rated freshman series—the trouble spots are only getting worse. Because Thursday is the most important night for advertisers (movie studios will pay any price to get fannies in the seats on opening weekends), the underdeliveries have had a destabilizing impact on NBC’s ad sales revenue. Leading off with the unvanquishable The Big Bang Theory, CBS’ two-hour comedy block commands more than twice the average unit cost booked by NBC in the same period ($207,006 versus $85,318). The same applies at 10 p.m., although in that instance, it’s ABC’s Beltway potboiler Scandal that outearns and outdelivers Parenthood by a 2.5-to-1 ratio. Season to date, NBC’s Thursday night roster is averaging a meager 1.3 in the dollar demo, down 13 percent versus the year-ago period. This is particularly disconcerting, given entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt’s big bet on the broad, family-oriented comedies Welcome to the Family, Sean Saves the World and The Michael J. Fox Show , the latter of which was locked in for a full 22-episode run before the pilot was even shot. While Parenthood has pulled its weight in the night’s final hour, the 10 p.m. slot has been a boneyard since ER closed up shop in 2009. Among the failed dramas that have inhabited the hour are Prime Suspect, which averaged a 1.2 rating; The Firm (0.9); and Do No Harm (0.8). By comparison, Parenthood’s 1.4 rating is electrifying. ABC’s own Thursday night woes include a dog’s breakfast of expensive flops: Charlie’s Angels, Missing, Last Resort, Zero Hour and the new fairy tale drama, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland . A spinoff of the surprise Sunday night hit, Wonderland on Oct. 17 drew a 1.2 in the demo.

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NBC Grounds Ironside, Welcome to the Family

October 18, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ironside is off the case. Effective Oct. 30, Ironside will roll to a halt, freeing up the Wednesday 10 p.m. time slot first for a repeat of Law & Order: SVU followed by three new episodes of Dateline over the next three Wednesdays. In the four subsequent weeks, NBC will air a pair of Saturday Night Live specials and two Christmas specials. On Jan. 8, 2014, the Chicago Fire spinoff Chicago PD arrives in the post-SVU slot. NBC has also axed the freshman comedy Welcome to the Family after just three episodes. Effective immediately, the Thursday 8:30 p.m. time slot will be occupied by a grab bag of encores, specials, back-to-back episodes of Parks and Recreation and the Thanksgiving night NFL game (Steelers at Ravens).

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CBS Gives Full-Season Orders to 3 Freshman Comedies

October 18, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS today announced that it has given back-nine orders for its three remaining comedy series: The Millers , The Crazy Ones and Mom.

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The Big Bang Theory Gets the Highest Ad Rates Outside of the NFL

October 14, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just as in the cosmological model that explains how the universe sprang into existence from an infinitely dense singularity, CBS’ The Big Bang Theory has grown with such explosive force that it appears to be its own ever-expanding universe. According to media buyers surveyed by Adweek, The Big Bang Theory in its seventh season now commands a staggering $326,260 per 30-second spot, topping the likes of NBC’s The Voice ($264,575 for the higher-rated Wednesday night show), ABC’s Modern Family ($257,435) and Fox’s The Simpsons ($256,963). The robust unit cost is a function of Big Bang’s monster ratings—three episodes into the fall season, Chuck Lorre’s sitcom is averaging 19.2 million viewers and a 5.6 rating in the adults 18-49 demo—and its seemingly unstoppable growth. After posting full-season highs two years running, Big Bang’s ratings are currently trending up 12 percent versus the 2012-13 campaign. Check out the comprehensive price list for the 2013-14 broadcast season here. While the NFL commands the highest unit cost of any TV property—Fox’s roster of eight late national NFC games fetches a jaw-dropping $595,000 per :30, while each unit in NBC’s Sunday Night Football franchise is worth around $570,000 a throw—the general entertainment programs enjoy a longer run: 35 weeks when lower-priced repeats are factored in. Among the Big Four broadcast nets, CBS earns the biggest average premiums for its freshman series. The Crazy Ones , the new Tuesday 9 p.m. anchor starring Robin Williams as an idiosyncratic ad agency boss, boasts an average unit cost of $175,200—the highest rate for any new comedy. The defending ratings champ also earns top dollar for Big Bang lead-out The Millers ($122,390), Lorre’s latest multicamera sitcom Mom ($138,575) and the ratings-challenged serialized thriller Hostages ($134,420). ABC’s established reach vehicles (Modern Family, Grey’s Anatomy and, more recently, Scandal) and its popularity with younger, affluent women have allowed it to remain competitive despite ongoing ratings hiccups. But it’s a new male-skewing series that’s really leading the charge this fall, as Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is pricing at an average rate of $169,730 per :30.

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Broadcasters Petition Supreme Court To Review Aereo Case

October 11, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Everyone expected broadcasters to petition the Supreme Court to review their copyright infringement case against Aereo. On Friday, broadcasters were true to their word. All the major network TV owners including ABC, Disney, CBS, NBCUniversal, Telemundo, Fox Television Stations, Univision Television, Public Broadcasting Service, and WPIX (owned by Tribune) filed a writ of certiorari with the high court.

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Broadcasters Ask Supreme Court to Shut Down Streaming-Video Service Aereo

October 11, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Major TV broadcasters on Friday petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to shut down Aereo Inc., a streaming-video startup backed by media mogul Barry Diller that they allege is stealing their content and putting their fundamental business model at risk. Broadcasters argued in the petition that Aereo, which streams local TV signals over the web for a fee without their permission, violates their copyrights. The broadcasters, who include Walt Disney Co.’s ABC, Comcast Corp.’s NBC, CBS Corp. and 21st Century Fox, are appealing a ruling by the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals, which denied their request for an injunction on Aereo earlier this year. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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Cory Monteith Tribute Lifts Glee, NBC Comedies Sink

October 11, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A heartfelt tribute to the late Cory Monteith (Finn) helped rally legions of Gleeks, giving the Fox musical drama its highest rating in over a year. “The Quarterback,” an elegy co-written by Glee creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, delivered 7.41 million viewers and a 2.8 in the adults 18-49 demo, improving upon last week’s rating (1.6) by 75 percent. The last time Glee put up bigger numbers was on Sept. 20, 2012, when the show delivered 7.46 million viewers and a 2.9 in the demo. Thursday night’s episode is the last before Glee heads off on its annual month-long hiatus. Episode 4 is slated to air on Nov. 7. If the emotional hour left fans scrambling for the Kleenex, the tears really started falling this morning when the overnights came in at NBC. After bowing to inauspicious ratings , newcomers Welcome to the Family, Sean Saves the World and The Michael J. Fox Show suffered staggering losses. Per Nielsen fast national data, Welcome to the Family dropped 27 percent to a 0.8 in the dollar demo, while Sean fell 29 percent to a 1.0. While both shows are in danger of cancelation, the Sony-produced Family will probably be the first to go. (Sean is produced in-house by Universal Television.) At 9:30 p.m., The Michael J. Fox Show fell another 29 percent to a 1.2 rating—a full 43 percent below its Sept. 26 time slot premiere. All told, the two-hour comedy block averaged a 1.1 in the demo, off the year-ago pace by one-half of a ratings point, or 31 percent. Whether it fills the 8:30 or 9 p.m. gap, look for Dan Harmon’s Community to rejoin the Thursday night fold before the leaves turn. ABC this morning was also the recipient of bad news, as its freshman genre exercise

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Ratings: Fox Stops the Bleeding, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Softens

October 9, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In the absence of a new episode of NBC’s The Voice, the Tuesday night broadcast lineup enjoyed a bit of a reprieve. But while a number of new series appeared to have reached a sort of equilibrium, one high-profile drama keeps losing steam. According to Nielsen fast national data, ABC’s freshman anchor Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. averaged 7.72 million viewers and a 2.8 rating among adults 18-49, down 15 percent versus a week ago and a whopping 40 percent off its premiere pace. While ABC projects that S.H.I.E.L.D. will improve to a 4.1 or 4.2 rating upon application of three days of DVR data, the decline is particularly sharp considering that the 8-9 p.m. competition was diluted by a hybrid NBC fall preview/Voice clip show. Even after airing what was essentially an encore performance, The Voice retained its top banana status, averaging a 2.9 in the demo from 8-10 p.m. (Hosted by Carson Daly, the 8-9 p.m. Voice recap/preview mashup tied S.H.I.E.L.D. in the demo.) S.H.I.E.L.D. continues to draw young men to the traditionally female-skewing ABC. Last night’s installment swept all the testosterone demos, averaging a 3.7 among men 18-49, a 3.1 with men 18-34 and a 4.1 in the male 25-54 set. Along with Brooklyn Nine-Nine, S.H.I.E.L.D also was the only Tuesday night show that drew more men than women. It’s worth noting that

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