Posts Tagged ‘cbs’

CBS Is Bringing Back Star Trek, But It Won’t Air on TV

November 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS is bringing back Star Trek, but the new series will boldly go where no previous iteration of the show has gone before: on a digital platform. In a first for CBS, the network announced this morning that a new Star Trek series will premiere in 2017 on the broadcast network before moving exclusively to subscription-on-demand service, CBS All Access. This will be the first series that CBS is producing solely for its digital platform, which launched in 2014. CBS All Access, which runs $5.99 per month, currently includes the entire library of every Star Trek television series. CBS Studios International will distribute the series to other TV networks and digital platforms around the world. Though CBS owns the show, and original creator Gene Roddenberry had initially developed it for CBS, it aired on NBC for three years from 1966-1969. The short-lived series spawned a massive pop culture franchise, which has included 12 feature films—with a 13th, Star Trek Beyond, due next year—and multiple spin-off shows. The new series will be developed by executive producer Alex Kurtzman, who co-wrote and produced the rebooted film franchise, beginning with 2009's Star Trek and continuing with 2013's, Star Trek Into Darkness. CBS said the new show is not related to the upcoming Star Trek Beyond film and will feature new characters and settings. "We've experienced terrific growth for CBS All Access, expanding the service across affiliates and devices in a very short time," said Marc DeBevoise, evp and general manager, CBS Digital Media. "We now have an incredible opportunity to accelerate this growth with the iconic Star Trek, and its devoted and passionate fan base, as our first original series." The move to put the new Star Trek exclusively on a digital platform comes as the broadcast industry is looking for ways to bring in elusive millennial viewers who often eschew traditional television. CBS successfully launched Supergirl last week with an eye toward younger viewers. But overnight Nielsen ratings—especially among the adults 18 to 49 demographic that advertisers covet—have been down so far this season. Nielsen will begin to roll out its new Total Audience Measurement tool to count viewers across multiple platforms next month. Star Trek continues the trend of cable and broadcast networks banking on reboots or remakes of known properties that come with built-in fan bases. This season alone has seen TV versions of the films Minority Report and Limitless, as well as a revival of another decades-old TV show: The Muppets.

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In Just 9 Months, Comedy Central Reshaped Late Night and Kept Advertisers Happy

November 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Not so long ago, Comedy Central's late-night lineup consisted of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report. What a difference a year makes. "If you had told me a year and a half ago that Jon and Stephen [Colbert] would leave within 12 months of each other and we'd launch two new series in a period of nine months, I would have gone and crawled under a rock somewhere," says Michele Ganeless, the network's president. "But looking back, it seems to all make sense now." When Colbert signed off last December as he prepared to take over The Late Show from David Letterman on CBS, Comedy Central tapped Larry Wilmore as his successor. Then in February, Stewart said he'd retire as Daily Show host by year's end. Ganeless courted major comics like Amy Schumer and Amy Poehler before offering the hosting gig to show contributor Trevor Noah. Hiring a millennial for the job "was really important, to bring new viewers in," says Ganeless. While ratings have fallen versus Stewart— Noah's premiere week was down 37 percent in adults 18-49 from a year earlier—Comedy Central stresses that the show is No. 1 among viewers 18-24 and has doubled its African-American audience in adults 18-34. Meanwhile, consumption of the show via digital platforms has jumped to 40 percent, from 30 percent last year. "That says to us we've done something right," says the exec. "He is absolutely the right guy to take this franchise into the future." Advertisers have bought in. "Demand never wavered, and when we sold the upfront we didn't change our pricing at all," says Jeff Lucas, head of sales and marketing at Viacom. "We said, 'Jon's show is getting older, and we want to be younger

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TV Review: ‘The Late Show With Stephen Colbert’

September 9, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Facing almost impossibly high expectations, Stephen Colbert seemingly raced through a checklist of agenda-setting moments in his mostly terrific “The Late Show” debut. Cameo by Jon Stewart. Check. Work in CBS CEO Leslie Moonves. Check. Earnestly pay tribute to David Letterman. Check.

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Here’s How the NFL Is Beefing Up Its Digital Presence

September 7, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

National Football League games are the biggest draw in broadcast television, with national telecasts averaging more than 20 million weekly viewers last season for one network—NBC—alone. While the league's digital presence has also been growing (NBC's streamed games averaged a record 3.3 million unique users last season, up 9 percent year over year), the NFL this season plans to livestream more games than ever across multiple platforms, including digital partners CBS Sports and Yahoo, and offer fans a comprehensive paid subscription service featuring premium content. To help make viewing a beefed-up, more seamless experience for fans, the NFL will announce on Tuesday that it has rolled up all its subscription offerings into one package called Domestic NFL Game Pass. The service, which will cost $99 per year, will include NFL Game Rewind, NFL Audio Pass, NFL Preseason Live and the subscription portion of the retooled NFL Now, which features NFL Films and other long-form content. The free, ad-supported version of NFL Now will be added to NFL Mobile and become the basis for much of the video on that platform. NFL Now will no longer be a stand-alone app. The goal is to provide fans with a more user-friendly experience. "A lot of people were confused by what they could get for free," explained Brian Rolapp, NFL's evp of media.

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Don’t Panic, Says CBS: More People Are Watching TV Now Than a Decade Ago

August 10, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On Friday, FX sounded the alarm about the state, and future, of television. But today CBS offered a counterpoint to FX chief John Landgraf's argument, as network execs made their case that TV's future is much healthier than many would believe. That was the message that David Poltrack, chief research officer of CBS Corp. and president of CBS Vision, and Marc DeBevoise, evp and gm at CBS Interactive, kept hammering home as they met with reporters at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour. Poltrack set out to puncture what he called three major "myths" about the industry and its future: that TV viewership is in decline (not true, he said), that millennials are moving away from TV content (only partly true) and that advertising in TV programs has lost value (also untrue, per Poltrack: "If executed effectively, advertising in TV programs has actually gained value"). When it comes to watching TV shows, Poltrack said, the audience for CBS programming has actually grown in the last decade. It's up to 12.3 million viewers in 2014-2015 from 12.1 million viewers in 2003-2004.

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How Daily Fantasy Sports Became a Heavyweight in the Advertising World

July 6, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It seems these days sports fans can't catch a game on TV or listen to sports talk radio without being hit with ads for daily fantasy sports (DFS). While fantasy sports have enjoyed a long run, with digital giants ESPN, Yahoo and CBS capturing the attention of sports-crazed gamers, a daily form of drafting players and tracking teams is exploding in popularity. The fantasy sports world boasts 56.8 million active players in the U.S. and Canada, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association. Of those, roughly 20 percent are participating exclusively in DFS, up from 8 percent in 2013, with just two providers—6-year-old FanDuel and 3-year-old DraftKings —cornering the market. It's not just fans' ability to build a new team on a daily basis that's the driver. The real key to DFS' success is legalized betting. Thanks to a series of technicalities, DFS players can win cash. One heavy hitter, Tommy Gelati, has won well over $100,000 playing DFS and even has parlayed his success into a hosting gig on SiriusXM's Fantasy Sports radio station. "I play high volume—thousands [of dollars] a day," said Gelati.

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Why Networks Are Going for Broke This Summer

May 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For decades, the broadcast networks took the idea of summer vacation quite literally—programming reruns and other filler content from June through mid-September, much to the frustration of advertisers. Those days are finally over, as broadcasters follow the lead of cable and, more recently, Netflix, by packing their summer slates with big series presented in unique ways that help audiences more easily consume content and aid advertisers in reaching viewers. "Summer is a critical time period for so many advertisers: back-to-school, retail, summer movies," noted Darcy Bowe, vp, media director at Starcom. "You really want to get your message out there, but because the broadcasters weren't programming anything new, people were trained not to watch TV in the summer." NBC is the first broadcaster to pull a Netflix with the May 28 debut of limited series Aquarius, starring David Duchovny. Immediately after the network premiere, the entire 13-episode series will be available to stream at NBC's website, on its mobile app and via other VOD platforms. The network will continue to air new episodes each week, but audiences can choose to binge on the entire series at once. Meanwhile, CBS has partnered with Netflix for its big summer premiere, Zoo, which will stream on the service as soon as its CBS run has concluded. Cable is also trying a nonlinear approach to summer programming. USA comedy Playing House returns for Season 2 in August with a VOD windowing strategy. Each episode will be made available on VOD one week before it airs on the network, with creator/stars Lennon Parham and Jessica St. Clair partnering with advertisers to create customized content. "If you have Toyota or one of our other sponsors in there, you'll be able to create content that's about Playing House but also about the sponsor as well," said Chris McCumber, USA's president. Because these shows are airing outside the September-to-May TV season, broadcasters have the flexibility to experiment without affecting the traditional fall schedule. Robert Greenblatt, NBC Entertainment chairman, said his network was able to stream Aquarius in full (the ad load of the linear broadcast will mirror that of VOD) because production on the entire season had already wrapped—unlike with most broadcast production schedules, which are only a few weeks ahead of an episode's airdate. Thanks to CBS' deal with Netflix, Zoo (based on the James Patterson novel) will be profitable before the drama even debuts on June 30. That gives the network a safety net as it attempts to lure a different audience during the summer months. Like CBS summer series Under the Dome and Extant, "Zoo is a big, epic-looking and feeling show," said CBS Entertainment chair Nina Tassler. "And they're all highly serialized. We don't do that during the regular season, so summer allows us to recruit new viewers and bring them into fall." While USA routinely airs series during the summer, "we've always seen August as an opportunity because it feels like there's a little bit of a dead space there," said McCumber. "So we thought it would be a great space to put Playing House where it will get more attention … and on top of that create a new opportunity for advertisers to come in and sell it in a different way." Advertisers worry whether digital platforms will cannibalize viewership on terrestrial television

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Why CBS Is Replacing David Letterman With Reruns of The Mentalist

May 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do you follow an icon like David Letterman and his perfect Late Show finale last Wednesday? For CBS, the answer might seem surprising: Simon Baker. Do not adjust your television sets; CBS is indeed currently airing repeats of The Mentalist, starring Baker, in the 11:30 p.m. late-night time slot Letterman occupied since 1993. In fact, all summer, until The Late Show with Stephen Colbert debuts Sept. 8, the network will show repeats of a different CBS drama each week

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‘The Goldbergs’ Actor Joins Dan O’Shannon CBS Comedy Pilot

April 16, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Jacob Hopkins, who is currently recurring on ABC’s “The Goldbergs,” will appear in CBS’ Dan O’Shannon comedy project, Variety has learned. The pilot from scribes O’Shannon (“Modern Family,” “Frasier,” “Cheers”) and Peter Warren follows a group of friends and family at three different times in their lives. Hopkins will guest star as Phil, a popular childhood acquaintance to Andrew (played... Read more

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2 Popular Fox News Shows Are Beating Their Broadcast Competition

April 10, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fox News has been the No. 1 cable news channel for 13 years, beating its cable competitors combined on many nights. But increasingly, the 21st Century Fox network is taking on its broadcast competition in both the morning and evening. Fox & Friends, which airs from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. EDT, and Special Report with Bret Baier, which airs at 6 p.m. EDT, are beating their broadcast morning and evening competitors in several top 20 markets across the country. Fox & Friends is outpacing CBS This Morning and ABC's Good Morning America in at least nine markets. In Atlanta, Fox & Friends has been beating CBS This Morning (and its predecessors) in households for 12 years. And Fox's show has been beating CBS's in Detroit for 11 years

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