Posts Tagged ‘cbs’

Billboard Music Awards Stomps Good Wife, Amazing Race Finales

May 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The week got off to a good start for ABC: the network's Sunday broadcast of the Billboard Music Awards won out handily over season finales of The Good Wife and The Amazing Race on CBS, both of which were flat in 18-49. The Billboard show hit a 13-year audience high—a rarity in an age of increased fragmentation. Billboard, like Adweek, is owned by affiliates of Guggenheim Partners.

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5 Time Slot Brawls to Watch This Fall

May 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With radically altered prime-time lineups at ABC and Fox, football on Thursday at CBS, and an NBC slate without its Thursday comedy block, the season is shaping up to be anything but the same old story. The only network that didn’t really change much was The CW, which is sticking with its costumes-and-cheekbones formula. Here are our matchups to keep an eye on:

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Fox Looks to ‘Sweep’ Its Rivals With 24 Reboot

May 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A week of May sweeps has been burned off and yet the broadcast networks have yet to air a single tent pole event. But while it’s been business as usual at the Big Four, a flurry of high-profile miniseries, limited-run serials and Very Special Episodes are set to air in the coming weeks. Perhaps the most anticipated scripted-TV event of the spring is Fox’s two-hour premiere of Fox’s 24: Live Another Day (Monday, May 5). While much has changed since Jack Bauer last saved the world four years ago (the action takes place in London, and the CTU gang has been scattered to the four winds), the reboot bears all the hallmarks of the original. (Breakneck narrative reversals? Check. Split screens, ticking clocks and assassination plots? You bet.) Arriving nearly two months to the day after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, 24 was nothing if not cathartic. While the subterranean fires still blazed between Vesey St. and Liberty St., Kiefer Sutherland’s rump-punting CTU agent was a human placebo of sorts, doing his bit to alleviate the shell shock of that horrible interval with his fictional acts of derring-do, while the real-world Federales bumbled around their war rooms and command centers.

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Nielsen-BlackArrow Pact Could Speed Adoption of On-Demand Ratings

April 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nielsen’s mandate to begin offering on-demand content ratings (ODCR) has come closer to fruition, as the TV measurement giant is on the brink of being able to insert current commercial loads into library VOD content. In a deal that will be formally announced Wednesday morning at the NCTA Cable Show , Nielsen has teamed up with the ad-tech firm BlackArrow in a partnership that promises to help speed up the implementation of ODCR.

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Sluggish Debuts for Bad Teacher, Black Box

April 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With just a month to go before the 2013-14 broadcast TV season slinks off into the murk of history, the networks on Thursday night launched a pair of last-gasp series. As one may well expect from a couple of shows that were reserved for a late-April premiere, the results were unspectacular. According to Nielsen fast national data, CBS repolishing of the 2011 theatrical Bad Teacher generated a fair amount of sampling, delivering 7.87 million viewers and a 2.1 in the adults 18-49 demo. Bad Teacher retained 84 percent of its Two and a Half Men lead-in (2.5). At any network but CBS, north of a 2.0 for a spring comedy debut would be cause for subdued celebration. Unfortunately, Teacher now stands as CBS’ second lowest-rated in-season sitcom premiere, trailing only the fall flop We Are Men, which drew a 2.0 on Monday, Sept. 30. If the 2.1 rating sticks, Teacher will rank as the season’s 13th highest-rated comedy premiere. Thus far, the networks have launched 20 new sitcoms; the only remaining comedies on the launch pad are the NBC summer strip Undateable (May 29) and Fox’s Us & Them, which is unlikely to ever see the light of day. As Teacher was signing off, ABC began unveiling its new physician-heal-thyself drama, Black Box. Leading out of Grey’s Anatomy , the pilot drew 6.59 million viewers and a 1.5 in the dollar demo, and while that marked a 15 percent improvement versus last spring’s debut of Motive (1.3), it was down 52 percent when compared to time slot predecessor Scandal’s season average (3.1). Black Box frittered away 35 percent of its Grey’s lead-in, although it did give CBS’ Elementary a run for its money in the 10 p.m. slot. The Sherlock Holmes drama eked out a 1.6 in the 18-49 demo.

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Rivalries Abound in CBS Thursday Night Football Slate

April 24, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The National Football League on Wednesday night took the wraps off its 2014 regular season schedule, and while CBS’ inaugural Thursday Night Football slate is packed with divisional rivalries, some of the matchups are strictly from nostalgia. Kicking off CBS’ TNF roster is the Week 2 (Sept. 11) grudge match between the AFC North’s Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Ravens. When last these two teams met on national television, they drew 21.1 million viewers and an 11.0 household rating, down 13 percent from NBC’s full-season Sunday Night Football average (12.6). The Ravens stole a victory from the visiting Steelers in a 22-20 squeaker that was played on Thanksgiving night. While Turkey Day generally offers a captive audience of tryptophan-doped football fans, the two antagonists actually put up bigger numbers in an earlier late national game on CBS.

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The 2014 Upfront Preview

April 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Analogies are often facile things, contrivances designed to hammer home a theme when a light tap of the mallet would suffice. But in light of the fact that it’s a) set in the advertising world and b) is the most self-reflexive show on television, the prospect of using Mad Men as a lens through which to observe the broadcast TV marketplace is too alluring to pass up. In a sense, each of the Big Four networks has a near-perfect analogue in one of the beautiful losers at Cooper Sterling Draper Dead Guy Harry Hamlin Whatever. CBS is clearly Roger Sterling. Les Moonves ’ silver fox flagship is bold, cocksure and is so damned good at doing its job that it almost makes the business of broadcast look easy. A fine-tuned revenue machine—its unparalleled retransmission consent numbers and homegrown output leaves it less exposed to the vicissitudes of the ad market than its rivals—CBS is something of an impenetrable fortress. But a chest X-ray and a full cardio workup might suggest that the aging network is one highball-and-tobacco binge away from catastrophic collapse. Although it probably would rather be Peggy Olson, ABC is Joan Harris. Unapologetically feminine, assertive and absolutely devastating when in its comfort zone, the network boasts some of the very few must-watch series on the broadcast dial. Unfortunately, when men aren’t leering at Joan like a horny wolf in a Tex Avery cartoon, they dismiss her altogether. (Perhaps if she wore a football helmet around the home office the boys would take her more seriously.) And while she always appears composed and unruffled—the picture of self-possession—under the surface she’s paddling furiously like a swan on Dexedrine. (It’s a hard-knock life when you’re on track to finish last in the ratings race for the third year running.) Fox is Pete Campbell. Youngish but starting to age faster than he really should be, the glib smarmball has embraced the ephemera of Southern California after making a hash of things back East. But while many of the attributes he once relied on have all but disintegrated (looking at you, American Idol and New Girl), Pete wavers between archly gaming the system and total system collapse. Like his implacably receding hairline, his mojo is really starting to wear thin. Although he’s got a string of successes under his needlepoint belt, the account exec is going to have to make some big moves in L.A. if he’s going to get back to his A game. Which leaves NBC. No. 1 with a bullet, the Peacock’s spirit animal is none other than Don Draper

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Craig Ferguson Congratulates ‘Lovely’ Stephen Colbert on ‘Late Show’ Gig

April 11, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Craig Ferguson dispenses with the elephant in the room at the start of tonight’s edition of “The Late Late Show” by acknowledging Stephen Colbert’s new gig as “Late Show” host. He addresses the matter head on at the start of his cold open. “First of all, before we begin tonight, may I congratulate the lovely... Read more

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With Stephen Colbert, CBS Makes the Perfect Choice

April 10, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Skeptics will wonder how long CBS had Stephen Colbert in its back pocket, given how smoothly the baton pass worked out. But whatever the back story, the network has found the perfect choice to replace David Letterman, in a coup that could potentially reset the latenight race to a scenario much like the one that... Read more

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Dogs and Cats Living Together: Ratings Dip for NCAA Finals

April 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In winning its fourth NCAA Men’s basketball title in 16 years, the University of Connecticut on Monday night took its rightful place among the greatest college hoops programs of the modern era. It’s only a shame that more people weren’t watching. According to Nielsen live-plus-same-day data, UConn’s 60-54 victory over the Kentucky Wildcats delivered 21.2 million viewers and a 12.4 household rating/20 share. In other words, one-fifth of all TV sets in use last night were tuned in to CBS’ coverage of the March Madness final. The broadcast peaked between 11 p.m. and 11:24 p.m.

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