Posts Tagged ‘cbs’

Jim Parsons Hits the Stratosphere

September 1, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Honestly, if this keeps up, they’re just going to have to rename the Emmy Award for Lead Actor in a Comedy the Jim Parsons Award. Last week, the 41-year-old won the prize for a fourth time for his role as Sheldon Cooper, main character on CBS’ The Big Bang Theory . It was a busy August for Parsons. Two weeks earlier, he and his cast mates Johnny Galecki and Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting signed a three-year deal with the show for $1 million per episode each, and more than one observer suggested CBS should be happy to pay so little. (Big Bang returns for Season 8 on Sept. 22.) Jim Parsons was photographed Aug. 27 by Randall Slavin on the Warner Bros. lot in Los Angeles. Parsons in particular is worth it. The sitcom is the most-watched show on broadcast, averaging a 6.2 rating in the dollar demo (the next-most popular show gets a 4.4). It’s also an incredibly valuable rerun, bringing in $2 million per episode for studio Warner Bros. Domestic TV. In many ways, it’s the swan song of the multicamera, laugh-track comedy era, with Parsons’ Sheldon at its center. Parsons, an accomplished stage actor, took time between seasons to play Tommy Boatwright in a revival of Larry Kramer’s groundbreaking autobiographical play about the AIDS crisis, The Normal Heart, in 2011, and then again in 2013 to reprise the role for Ryan Murphy’s adaptation for HBO . Over the phone, Parsons is warm and deferential, discussing his career successes the way you’d talk about finding a $50 bill on the ground. But it’s clear after a moment or two of conversation that he’s also a guy who takes nothing for granted. Adweek: You started your career on the stage, and you’ve come back to New York to work in The Normal Heart on Broadway in between seasons. Do you miss that part of your career? Parsons: Yes, without a doubt

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What Did TV CEOs Tell Investors About the Weak Ad Market?

August 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Now that second-quarter earnings are over for the media sector, we can finally take a good look at what senior media company executives actually said on calls to investors when they were in the hot seat at the end of the summer. Here are some of the reasons the market was down... and some of the spin. (If you'd like to check out the calls yourself, they've been helpfully compiled

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What Did TV CEOs Tell Investors About the Weak Ad Market?

August 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Now that second-quarter earnings are over for the media sector, we can finally take a good look at what senior media company executives actually said on calls to investors when they were in the hot seat at the end of the summer. Here are some of the reasons the market was down... and some of the spin. (If you'd like to check out the calls yourself, they've been helpfully compiled

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All of San Francisco Hates NFL Red Zone Advertising

August 11, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Here's an agreement between The Northern California Toyota Dealers Association and the San Francisco 49ers that seems to have caught viewers’ attention in all the wrong ways: During the team’s first 2014 preseason game on CBS affiliate KPIX last Thursday, computer-generated ads for the car dealers covered the red zone . The graphics appeared when the offense for either the 49ers or their opponents, the Baltimore Ravens, started a down inside the opponent’s 20-yard line. The messages remained onscreen during actual game play. So far it's only on local ads, but locals do not care for it. Other teams have also begun experimenting with red-zone advertising—much to the displeasure of the NFL’s target demo. Deadspin called the campaigns “horrifying,” and SB Nation used bold text and all caps when titling one of these

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With Broadcast Volume Down, TV Inventory Is Going to Get Expensive

June 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If everybody waits out this upfront for better inventory in the fall, will anybody get enough of it? Brian Wieser, analyst at Pivotal Research (and a former head forecaster for Magna Global), said he’s predicting volume decreases on the order of between 5 percent and 10 percent across what was a $9.25 billion upfront bazaar last year (where networks saw strong interest in upfront commitments), which was followed by a weak season. That puts the upfront haul (which is, of course, largely theoretical anyway—clients can cancel up to 25 percent of their commitments) comfortably south of the $9 billion mark. But it also means more of the real buying will get done after the season’s hits are established, and at a hefty markup. “Scatter is going to be pricey,” said one network exec flatly. Don’t confuse this talk with the CPM gains networks tout during the upfront —those can be valuable, but they can also be a smokescreen when dollar volume is down. “We’ve had a couple of years where it seems like all of the scatter business was pushed into the upfront markets, and that, surprisingly, continued into last year from the year before,” explained Wieser. “Because [the trend] didn’t break last year, we had virtually no volume in the scatter market [since new shows couldn’t deliver the ratings].” Clients, Wieser said, are asking themselves why they’re putting so much money down in the upfront when that money just gets redistributed at midseason to atone for underdeliveries. Why not hold back that money and spend it when it’s clear what the hits are, rather than have money languish at a network where your customers aren’t watching? Well, buyers are about to find out whether or not the trade-off—better shows for higher prices—is worth it. “‘Why don’t we look to see what pops up in the middle of the year and whose seasons are strongest?’” Wieser asked rhetorically. The glum ratio of hits to misses isn’t new—even the networks themselves joke about how bad it is—so if you don’t have to lock in your buys, why bother? But if every advertiser decides that this is the season to cut back on upfront budgets and put the remaining cash into scatter inventory on the season’s established hits, scatter pricing is going to go through the roof.

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CBS Finishes Upfront With CPM Increases Lower Than Last Year

June 13, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This upfront season, it's all over but the shouting for CBS, according to a statement released by the organization itself today. “As we near the finish line, we are very confident that CBS has once again achieved the highest pricing and most total dollars in the upfront marketplace," said a spokesperson in a rare official statement by the network. "Agencies and clients continue to value the strength, stability and delivery that we provide as a pure-play broadcaster, and we are very pleased that in addition to C3, C7 is now playing a meaningful part in our negotiations.” It is unusual for CBS to come out and say that it's more or less done with upfront deals—but as it's the first network to cross the finish line, perhaps that's in order. It also serves to put the market on notice—things are probably going to move more quickly this year than last. The cable market just started to movie this week, as well, with budgets registered at several of the major players and momentum building at Turner, among others.

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Report: Univision Holds Potential Sale Talks With CBS, Time Warner

June 13, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Univision held preliminary talks with CBS and Time Warner over a potential sale, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal. The U.S.-based Spanish-language broadcaster is said to be seeking at least $20 billion for the sale. That’s far more than the $13.7 billion a group of investors led by Haim Saban paid for... Read more

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Nobody Wants to Marry Harry

May 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's not like you could have made a second season of gag reality show I Wanna Marry Harry, anyway, but Fox execs who might have been considering the option aren't going to get the chance with these ratings. The show dipped a painful 48 percent in its second frame (partly due to the loss of lead-in American Idol, which also isn't exactly setting the world on fire , and also probably because the show has been a hate magnet ) after a none-too-spectacular first outing last week. The show is about a guy who pretends to be Prince Harry in order to trick some not-terribly-bright girls into dating him.

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Streamy Romance: Americans’ Love Affair With B Movies Goes Digital

May 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On an October morning in 2008, a truck loaded with VHS cassettes pulled away from Distribution Video Audio’s warehouse in Palm Harbor, Fla.—and made history: It was the last major shipment of movies on VHS bound for retail stores. As owner Ryan J. Kugler told the Los Angeles Times: “It’s dead. This is it.” VHS was dead. In fact, A History of Violence, the last major Hollywood title put on videocassette, appeared in 2006. But the demise of VHS didn’t mean that Americans had wearied of watching movies in their living rooms. In fact, we do more of it all the time. A recent Harris Poll revealed that 57 percent of consumers would rather watch a film at home than in the theater. A survey from Motorola showed the average time we spend watching movies at home has jumped from five hours a week to six. So while the medium might change, the love for home screening had not—and that’s the lesson on view in the two ads here. In a technical sense, the only difference between this 1985 ad for CBS/Fox Video and its 2014 Warner Archive counterpart is that magnetic tape has ceded its place to digital. Otherwise, both ads testify not just to the profitability of the back catalog, but to a curious truth about American cinematic tastes. Even the most obscure, marginal B-grade movie has someone, somewhere, who loves it. Actually, a loyal fan base is probably the only thing that can explain why media companies this rich can get away with creating ads this marginal. “Neither is particularly pleasing to the eye or says much, visually, about the storyline of the films,” observed movie marketing consultant Sheri Candler

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Billboard Music Awards Stomps Good Wife, Amazing Race Finales

May 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The week got off to a good start for ABC: the network's Sunday broadcast of the Billboard Music Awards won out handily over season finales of The Good Wife and The Amazing Race on CBS, both of which were flat in 18-49. The Billboard show hit a 13-year audience high—a rarity in an age of increased fragmentation. Billboard, like Adweek, is owned by affiliates of Guggenheim Partners.

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