Posts Tagged ‘cbs’

With Broadcast Volume Down, TV Inventory Is Going to Get Expensive

June 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If everybody waits out this upfront for better inventory in the fall, will anybody get enough of it? Brian Wieser, analyst at Pivotal Research (and a former head forecaster for Magna Global), said he’s predicting volume decreases on the order of between 5 percent and 10 percent across what was a $9.25 billion upfront bazaar last year (where networks saw strong interest in upfront commitments), which was followed by a weak season. That puts the upfront haul (which is, of course, largely theoretical anyway—clients can cancel up to 25 percent of their commitments) comfortably south of the $9 billion mark. But it also means more of the real buying will get done after the season’s hits are established, and at a hefty markup. “Scatter is going to be pricey,” said one network exec flatly. Don’t confuse this talk with the CPM gains networks tout during the upfront —those can be valuable, but they can also be a smokescreen when dollar volume is down. “We’ve had a couple of years where it seems like all of the scatter business was pushed into the upfront markets, and that, surprisingly, continued into last year from the year before,” explained Wieser. “Because [the trend] didn’t break last year, we had virtually no volume in the scatter market [since new shows couldn’t deliver the ratings].” Clients, Wieser said, are asking themselves why they’re putting so much money down in the upfront when that money just gets redistributed at midseason to atone for underdeliveries. Why not hold back that money and spend it when it’s clear what the hits are, rather than have money languish at a network where your customers aren’t watching? Well, buyers are about to find out whether or not the trade-off—better shows for higher prices—is worth it. “‘Why don’t we look to see what pops up in the middle of the year and whose seasons are strongest?’” Wieser asked rhetorically. The glum ratio of hits to misses isn’t new—even the networks themselves joke about how bad it is—so if you don’t have to lock in your buys, why bother? But if every advertiser decides that this is the season to cut back on upfront budgets and put the remaining cash into scatter inventory on the season’s established hits, scatter pricing is going to go through the roof.

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CBS Finishes Upfront With CPM Increases Lower Than Last Year

June 13, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This upfront season, it's all over but the shouting for CBS, according to a statement released by the organization itself today. “As we near the finish line, we are very confident that CBS has once again achieved the highest pricing and most total dollars in the upfront marketplace," said a spokesperson in a rare official statement by the network. "Agencies and clients continue to value the strength, stability and delivery that we provide as a pure-play broadcaster, and we are very pleased that in addition to C3, C7 is now playing a meaningful part in our negotiations.” It is unusual for CBS to come out and say that it's more or less done with upfront deals—but as it's the first network to cross the finish line, perhaps that's in order. It also serves to put the market on notice—things are probably going to move more quickly this year than last. The cable market just started to movie this week, as well, with budgets registered at several of the major players and momentum building at Turner, among others.

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Report: Univision Holds Potential Sale Talks With CBS, Time Warner

June 13, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Univision held preliminary talks with CBS and Time Warner over a potential sale, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal. The U.S.-based Spanish-language broadcaster is said to be seeking at least $20 billion for the sale. That’s far more than the $13.7 billion a group of investors led by Haim Saban paid for... Read more

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Nobody Wants to Marry Harry

May 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's not like you could have made a second season of gag reality show I Wanna Marry Harry, anyway, but Fox execs who might have been considering the option aren't going to get the chance with these ratings. The show dipped a painful 48 percent in its second frame (partly due to the loss of lead-in American Idol, which also isn't exactly setting the world on fire , and also probably because the show has been a hate magnet ) after a none-too-spectacular first outing last week. The show is about a guy who pretends to be Prince Harry in order to trick some not-terribly-bright girls into dating him.

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Streamy Romance: Americans’ Love Affair With B Movies Goes Digital

May 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On an October morning in 2008, a truck loaded with VHS cassettes pulled away from Distribution Video Audio’s warehouse in Palm Harbor, Fla.—and made history: It was the last major shipment of movies on VHS bound for retail stores. As owner Ryan J. Kugler told the Los Angeles Times: “It’s dead. This is it.” VHS was dead. In fact, A History of Violence, the last major Hollywood title put on videocassette, appeared in 2006. But the demise of VHS didn’t mean that Americans had wearied of watching movies in their living rooms. In fact, we do more of it all the time. A recent Harris Poll revealed that 57 percent of consumers would rather watch a film at home than in the theater. A survey from Motorola showed the average time we spend watching movies at home has jumped from five hours a week to six. So while the medium might change, the love for home screening had not—and that’s the lesson on view in the two ads here. In a technical sense, the only difference between this 1985 ad for CBS/Fox Video and its 2014 Warner Archive counterpart is that magnetic tape has ceded its place to digital. Otherwise, both ads testify not just to the profitability of the back catalog, but to a curious truth about American cinematic tastes. Even the most obscure, marginal B-grade movie has someone, somewhere, who loves it. Actually, a loyal fan base is probably the only thing that can explain why media companies this rich can get away with creating ads this marginal. “Neither is particularly pleasing to the eye or says much, visually, about the storyline of the films,” observed movie marketing consultant Sheri Candler

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Billboard Music Awards Stomps Good Wife, Amazing Race Finales

May 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The week got off to a good start for ABC: the network's Sunday broadcast of the Billboard Music Awards won out handily over season finales of The Good Wife and The Amazing Race on CBS, both of which were flat in 18-49. The Billboard show hit a 13-year audience high—a rarity in an age of increased fragmentation. Billboard, like Adweek, is owned by affiliates of Guggenheim Partners.

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5 Time Slot Brawls to Watch This Fall

May 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With radically altered prime-time lineups at ABC and Fox, football on Thursday at CBS, and an NBC slate without its Thursday comedy block, the season is shaping up to be anything but the same old story. The only network that didn’t really change much was The CW, which is sticking with its costumes-and-cheekbones formula. Here are our matchups to keep an eye on:

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Fox Looks to ‘Sweep’ Its Rivals With 24 Reboot

May 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A week of May sweeps has been burned off and yet the broadcast networks have yet to air a single tent pole event. But while it’s been business as usual at the Big Four, a flurry of high-profile miniseries, limited-run serials and Very Special Episodes are set to air in the coming weeks. Perhaps the most anticipated scripted-TV event of the spring is Fox’s two-hour premiere of Fox’s 24: Live Another Day (Monday, May 5). While much has changed since Jack Bauer last saved the world four years ago (the action takes place in London, and the CTU gang has been scattered to the four winds), the reboot bears all the hallmarks of the original. (Breakneck narrative reversals? Check. Split screens, ticking clocks and assassination plots? You bet.) Arriving nearly two months to the day after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, 24 was nothing if not cathartic. While the subterranean fires still blazed between Vesey St. and Liberty St., Kiefer Sutherland’s rump-punting CTU agent was a human placebo of sorts, doing his bit to alleviate the shell shock of that horrible interval with his fictional acts of derring-do, while the real-world Federales bumbled around their war rooms and command centers.

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Nielsen-BlackArrow Pact Could Speed Adoption of On-Demand Ratings

April 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nielsen’s mandate to begin offering on-demand content ratings (ODCR) has come closer to fruition, as the TV measurement giant is on the brink of being able to insert current commercial loads into library VOD content. In a deal that will be formally announced Wednesday morning at the NCTA Cable Show , Nielsen has teamed up with the ad-tech firm BlackArrow in a partnership that promises to help speed up the implementation of ODCR.

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Sluggish Debuts for Bad Teacher, Black Box

April 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With just a month to go before the 2013-14 broadcast TV season slinks off into the murk of history, the networks on Thursday night launched a pair of last-gasp series. As one may well expect from a couple of shows that were reserved for a late-April premiere, the results were unspectacular. According to Nielsen fast national data, CBS repolishing of the 2011 theatrical Bad Teacher generated a fair amount of sampling, delivering 7.87 million viewers and a 2.1 in the adults 18-49 demo. Bad Teacher retained 84 percent of its Two and a Half Men lead-in (2.5). At any network but CBS, north of a 2.0 for a spring comedy debut would be cause for subdued celebration. Unfortunately, Teacher now stands as CBS’ second lowest-rated in-season sitcom premiere, trailing only the fall flop We Are Men, which drew a 2.0 on Monday, Sept. 30. If the 2.1 rating sticks, Teacher will rank as the season’s 13th highest-rated comedy premiere. Thus far, the networks have launched 20 new sitcoms; the only remaining comedies on the launch pad are the NBC summer strip Undateable (May 29) and Fox’s Us & Them, which is unlikely to ever see the light of day. As Teacher was signing off, ABC began unveiling its new physician-heal-thyself drama, Black Box. Leading out of Grey’s Anatomy , the pilot drew 6.59 million viewers and a 1.5 in the dollar demo, and while that marked a 15 percent improvement versus last spring’s debut of Motive (1.3), it was down 52 percent when compared to time slot predecessor Scandal’s season average (3.1). Black Box frittered away 35 percent of its Grey’s lead-in, although it did give CBS’ Elementary a run for its money in the 10 p.m. slot. The Sherlock Holmes drama eked out a 1.6 in the 18-49 demo.

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