Posts Tagged ‘cable’

Moonves: Big Bang Theory Will Move to Accommodate NFL Games

February 13, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a bid to accommodate the hulking bruiser that is the National Football League, Leonard, Sheldon, Penny and the rest of The Big Bang Theory crew next fall will be moving out of the Nerdvana of Thursday night for a slot earlier in the week. Speaking to investors during CBS Corp.’s fourth quarter earnings call, CEO Les Moonves confirmed that broadcast’s No. 1 scripted show would temporarily step aside to make way for the network’s new eight-game NFL package . “What we will do with our Thursday night is, we have some big shows, such as The Big Bang Theory … and we’re not going to wait until November to launch that,” Moonves said. “That’s going to be on the air on some other night, which will grow the ratings and the rates on some other night.” (That answers one question .) Moonves added that the sophomore drama Elementary is also likely to shift to another night, and while he did not offer a specific target destination, the smart money’s on Monday. Such a move would be a homecoming of sorts for Big Bang, which in its first three seasons occupied various time slots during the night before moving to the Thursday anchor position in fall 2010. CBS could also use a boost from Elementary, which if nothing else might stanch the bleeding in the network’s Monday 10 p.m. slot. In a rare stumble, two new CBS dramas have faltered in that position; the serialized thriller Hostages averaged just 5.16 million live-plus-same-day viewers and a 1.2 rating among adults 18-49, while successor Intelligence is faring only slightly better against NBC’s The Blacklist. While no decisions have been made on its Thursday freshman comedies The Millers and The Crazy Ones, CBS is all but certain to cancel the long-in-the-tooth Two and a Half Men. Now in its eleventh season, the Chuck Lorre sitcom has plummeted 44 percent in the demo and features one of TV’s priciest casts. (Leads Ashton Kutcher commands on the order of $700,000 per episode for his work on Men, while Jon Cryer rakes in $600,000 for any given show.) After acknowledging that the competition for the new Thursday night NFL show case was “pretty fierce,” Moonves suggested that CBS was really the only proper fit for the league’s purposes. “At the end of the day, it really wasn’t about money,” he said. “The NFL was more interested in establishing their Thursday night and being in partnership with a brand, a company, a network that would do a better job of establishing that into the future.” Moonves went on to note that much as it does already on Sunday afternoons, football will serve as a powerful promotional vehicle for CBS’ fall schedule. He then added that the network hopes to extend the deal beyond the single year for which CBS is contracted. (The NFL has the right to add a second season of Thursday Night Football at its discretion.) “I am extremely pleased to have this.

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Comcast-Time Warner Cable Regulatory Review Will Be Raucous

February 13, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The proposed $44.5 billion merger between Comcast and Time Warner Cable will keep both public interest groups and regulators busy in the coming months. Expect a raucous and drawn-out transaction before regulators make their decision.

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HLN Refocuses on Viral, Social Content

February 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

HLN is drastically switching focus from salacious court coverage to viral-hopeful segments and upbeat coverage of stories like " Is America Ready for a Gay NFL Player? " (not coincidentally also the front-page story on BuzzFeed, which broke news of the major rebrand this morning). The network is making its website a friendlier place to find whatever's a big deal on Facebook or Twitter at the moment, and Turner (which owns HLN) announced this morning that it would be replacing What Would You Do, its 10 p.m. hidden-camera show, with a syndicated series called RightThisMinute. WWYD will continue running at 5 p.m. The new show will find "the most captivating web videos and the stories behind them as they break," with the aspiration of locating videos before they go viral.

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4 Burning Questions About CBS’ New NFL Package

February 6, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In securing the rights to the National Football League’s new Thursday night franchise , CBS effectively pulled the rug out from under its broadcast competition. While it’s no secret that NBC has been having a rough time of it on the crucial night, Fox isn’t faring all that well on fall Thursdays, either. (While its 8 p.m. time slot remains a quandary, ABC’s battery of the indefatigable Grey’s Anatomy and the smash hit Scandal make it bulletproof, especially among female viewers.) Those who were absolutely convinced that NBC would spend its way to a rights win remain perplexed by how the Peacock let itself get outflanked by CBS. But according to sources with insight into the auction, CBS’ offer, which was estimated to be around $275 million, actually did not overshadow its rivals—in fact, one suitor suggests that NBC’s bid was the highest of the five. Instead, the network’s dominance on Thursday nights and its willingness to shoulder the load on the production costs for all 16 games (this includes the eight telecasts that will run on NFL Network in the second half of the season) gave CBS the edge. And while the impact of erecting another broadcast NFL tent pole will be significant, CBS faces some uncertainty as it plans its fall schedule. Here are five of the biggest questions facing the network as of today: 1) What’s going to happen to The Big Bang Theory? It’s a ratings monster and generates tremendous amounts of ad sales revenue , but the endearingly nerdy sitcom’s 8 p.m. start time is likely to overlap CBS’ pre-game show. (NFL Network’s Thursday Night Football games kick off at 8:29 p.m. ET.) So, while CBS could just as soon bench The Big Bang Theory until Nov. 6, it’s more likely to shift the show to Monday night in the slot currently occupied by the departing How I Met Your Mother

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AMC Is Definitely Developing ‘Preacher’

February 6, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As reported , AMC and Sony Pictures TV have officially tapped Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg to develop Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon's controversial 1990's comic book series Preacher for AMC. The show will follow troubled preacher Jesse Custer (note initials) through Texas and beyond as he tries to come to grips with his newfound superpower—the ability to make absolutely anyone do what he tells them to do. The series has been in development in various forms and stages for years, and comics writer Ennis said that the TV format "seems a much more natural home for the story than a two-hour movie." Ennis had kind words for the production team, as well: "I’m particularly impressed that Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg and Sam Catlin understand Preacher fully -- meaning they get it for what it is, not some vague approximation." "We've tried for seven years to work on Preacher and we're so psyched AMC is finally letting us," said Goldberg and Rogen in a statement. "It is our favorite comic of all time, and we're going to do everything we can to do it right." Preacher won as many awards as the comics industry could give it during its original five-year run; its cynical, humorous take on religion won it a devoted fan following and launched Ennis' long career. News of the TV adaptation began to spread in November when AMC Networks COO Ed Carroll reportedly told a comic book store employee he was eyeing the series.

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With NFL Win, CBS Lands an Even Bigger Bang

February 5, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a somewhat surprising turn of events, CBS appears to have outbid its broadcast competition for the rights to the new Thursday night NFL package. While NBC was thought to be the lead dog in the hunt for the eight-game parcel, CBS emerged the victor. The broadcaster will air Thursday night games in September and October, all of which will be simulcast on NFL Network.

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Adult Swim Adds a Primetime Hour

February 4, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Cartoon Network is losing the 8 p.m. hour to Adult Swim, the edgy sister network that shares its space on the dial. Adult Swim has been one of Turner's most significant success stories in recent years, with consistently high ratings among its hard-to-reach target demo, while Cartoon has struggled against competitors Nickelodeon and Disney. For 2013, Adult Swim finished the year in first place among adults 18-34 in total day and came in only second to TBS in primetime, despite not actually airing during the 8 p.m. hour. That's set to change starting March 31, when Adult Swim takes over the 8 o'clock hour and Cartoon Network starts making more inroads online. Additionally, Boomerang, the company's smaller, higher-tier classic-cartoon network (basically, where you go if you want to see Bugs Bunny) will become ad-supported as of this upfront season and be marketed internationally as well.

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SundanceTV President Is on the Lookout for Flawed Characters

February 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who

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MSNBC Twitter Manager Fired for Saying "the Rightwing" Will Hate Interracial Cheerios Ad

January 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Welp, that was fast. Cheerios announced a cute sequel to its surprisingly controversial 2013 ad featuring an interracial family (the original

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Comcast to Tap Set-Top Data for Advanced Advertising Service

January 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBCUniversal on Thursday unveiled “NBCU+ Powered By Comcast,” a platform designed to sell targeted ads to video-on-demand users while offering clients insights culled from anonymized subscriber set-top box data. The media conglomerate said the new service would help optimize national campaigns across the NBCU linear TV portfolio by providing greater insights into viewer usage patterns. Naturally, the $64,000 question is, will

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