Posts Tagged ‘cable’

MTV Gets Social With Teen Wolf Memorial Site

March 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Back in the day, Scott Howard was an undersized point guard with a bad outside hook shot and a self-professed egg allergy. For reasons that are never fully explained in the 1985 film, Teen Wolf, the 5’ 3” Everyman ( Michael J. Fox ) is transformed into a basketball prodigy when his familial lycanthropy kicks in, presumably at the onset of puberty. (This makes no sense. Air Bud aside, dogs suck at basketball.) Flash forward 30 years [!], and Scott’s surname is now McCall, and instead of roundball, he devotes himself to the sport of kings and New England meatheads, lacrosse. MTV’s Teen Wolf is a lot darker as well—whereas at the end of the theatrical, Scott Howard realizes that his true love is his buddy Lisa “Boof” Marconi , the furry 21st Century incarnation has much worse luck with girls. In fact [SPOILER ALERT], Scott’s ex, Allison Argent , is not only descended from a long line of werewolf hunters, but she’s also, like, totally dead. Having taken a sword blade in the midsection, Allison (Crystal Reed) dies in the arms of her lax bro beau, which is where the story really takes off. Immediately after the credits rolled in Season 3’s second-to-last installment, MTV went live with the community site, TeenWolfMemorial.com . Visitors to the site are greeted with the trappings of Neo Goth grief, including a blank headstone, a spray of fresh-cut white roses and some dark, loamy topsoil. Click through to continue to the “memorial” and there’s the wonkily photoshopped Teen Wolf cast, moodily huddled around a grave marker that is already growing mossy around the edges. (Beacon Hills is hella damp, yo.) Carved into the stone above Allison’s name is a French phrase that translates to “We protect those who cannot protect themselves,” which essentially served as the Argents’ motto and raison d’

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ABC Is Top Banana in 4A’s Homes

March 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Although it’s destined to finish last again this season among broadcast’s Big Four, ABC boasts a much higher profile in the homes of ad agency types. According to a new study from Collective , 4A’s members and their families watch ABC more than any other major TV network. In fact, the two most-watched shows among the 4A’s set are the long-running newsmagazine 20/20 and the freshman comedy Super Fun Night—both of which call ABC home. If those results are rather surprising—20/20 airs on low HUT-level Friday nights, while Super Fun Night averaged only 5.1 million viewers over its brief run—there’s more where that came from. For instance, while it just cracks the top 20 in terms of overall prime-time deliveries, Bravo is the most-watched cable network in 4A’s circles, beating out the likes of ESPN, AMC and CNN. 4A’s members also preferred the now-defunct NBC comedy Sean Saves the World , and the offspring of these brand marketers and advertisers are more likely to watch the CW’s Arrow than any other program. While Collective and agency partner ZenithOptimedia admittedly are working within the confines of a rather narrow constituency, the study was designed to illustrate some greater truths about optimizing media buys. “Obviously, it’s great to make 4A’s Transformation attendees the center of attention,” said Collective CEO Joe Apprendi. “It’s a way to validate what they’re watching—you look out and see a lot of nodding heads in the audience—while presenting a much more clear picture of exactly how TV analytics works.” In order to gather the data, Collective placed a pixel on the 4A’s homepage , which allowed it to track correlations between online behavior and TV viewing habits, as illuminated by Rentrak set-top box data. In a more generalized execution, engagement and attentiveness metrics would be brought to bear to create a highly detailed index of online activity as it relates to TV usage. ZenithOptimedia president, activation John Nitti will present the findings of the optimization study today at 10:30 a.m. PDT, alongside his colleague, Zenith svp, director of research John Nuding.

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City of Los Angeles Files $10 Million Suit Against Time Warner Cable

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The city of Los Angeles is suing Time Warner Cable for nearly $10 million in allegedly unpaid franchise fees, a backlog that stretches back to 2010. In a complaint filed Friday with the United States District Court for the Central District of California, city attorney Mike Feuer charged Time Warner Cable with bilking the municipality to the tune of $9.7 million, a sum that includes $7.19 million in unpaid 2010 and 2011 franchise fees and another $2.51 million in delinquent payments from the previous two years. “Time Warner Cable has derived billions of dollars from its cable television franchise in the city of Los Angeles, yet stubbornly continues to flout its statutory obligations to compensate the city … fully for this privilege,” the complaint reads, before going on to note that the cable operator generates “more than $1 billion in revenue every two years from the residents of Los Angeles, a sum dwarfing the fees it is required to pay the city in return.” The city’s attorneys said that the unpaid franchise fees and Public, Educational, Government use fees represent millions that could be put to use to pay firefighter and police officer salaries and maintain parks and libraries. While the charges in the suit are characteristically byzantine, the city’s central argument would appear to boil down to the “precipitous and wrongful withholding” of contractually owed monies. Feuer’s office seems particularly enraged by the fact that the operator underpaid by as much as $5.22 million at the end of the city’s 2010-11 financial year, which only served to “exacerbate the City’s well-publicized fiscal crisis.” The defendants cited in the 24-page complaint are Time Warner Cable, Inc., Time Warner Cable Pacific West, Time Warner Cable Enterprises and the Time Warner Entertainment Advance/Newhouse Partnership.

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City of Los Angeles Files $10 Million Suit Against Time Warner Cable

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The city of Los Angeles is suing Time Warner Cable for nearly $10 million in allegedly unpaid franchise fees, a backlog that stretches back to 2010. In a complaint filed Friday with the United States District Court for the Central District of California, city attorney Mike Feuer charged Time Warner Cable with bilking the municipality to the tune of $9.7 million, a sum that includes $7.19 million in unpaid 2010 and 2011 franchise fees and another $2.51 million in delinquent payments from the previous two years. “Time Warner Cable has derived billions of dollars from its cable television franchise in the city of Los Angeles, yet stubbornly continues to flout its statutory obligations to compensate the city … fully for this privilege,” the complaint reads, before going on to note that the cable operator generates “more than $1 billion in revenue every two years from the residents of Los Angeles, a sum dwarfing the fees it is required to pay the city in return.” The city’s attorneys said that the unpaid franchise fees and Public, Educational, Government use fees represent millions that could be put to use to pay firefighter and police officer salaries and maintain parks and libraries. While the charges in the suit are characteristically byzantine, the city’s central argument would appear to boil down to the “precipitous and wrongful withholding” of contractually owed monies. Feuer’s office seems particularly enraged by the fact that the operator underpaid by as much as $5.22 million at the end of the city’s 2010-11 financial year, which only served to “exacerbate the City’s well-publicized fiscal crisis.” The defendants cited in the 24-page complaint are Time Warner Cable, Inc., Time Warner Cable Pacific West, Time Warner Cable Enterprises and the Time Warner Entertainment Advance/Newhouse Partnership.

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Nickelodeon’s Jim Perry Is Courting More Adult Advertisers

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nickelodeon revealed its slate to advertisers yesterday, and while it's all squeaky-clean kids' fare (well, relatively speaking: "As you can see from the reel, bathroom humor still works," observed Nickelodeon president Cyma Zarghami during the presentation), the network is seeking ad partners with a greater emphasis on categories you wouldn't necessarily associate with children. "Kindle is sponsoring the Kids' Choice Awards," said Jim Perry, head of sales for the Nickelodeon group (which includes Nick proper, Nick Jr. and Nick at Nite), "and we now have over 15 retailers on our air—everything from Target and old Navy to Stride Rite and the Burlington Coat Factory." Obviously, that's not because kids are stealing the car and driving to Target. For many years, the rule that advertisers direct their ads at parents and not children was regarded as pro forma by clients. But in recent years, heightening standards (and parental activism) around unhealthy foods, coupled with the decline of the traditional toy market, have meant that advertisers really do have to use Nick—which controls the vast majority of saleable GRPs in the kids' market—to talk to parents themselves. Perry is way ahead of them. "You can really build a great financial literacy campaign around saving and learning the value of a dollar whether or not you're showing a credit card ad," he said. Placements and integrations like Toyota's SpongeBob ... uh, mobile

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A&E Shelves Those Who Kill

March 13, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After two weeks of soft ratings, A&E has taken the new Chlo

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Cartoon Network Upfront: Established Names and an Invitation to Native Advertisers

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Cartoon Network is forgoing a traditional New York advertiser presentation for a second year running, but the kids' network hasn't been idle: new series including offbeat comedy Clarence and Elijah Wood-starring miniseries Over the Garden Wall are a part of the network's 2014-15 slate. But the real juice in the network's new list of green-lights seems to be in the world of established intellectual property. The network's next major project is its digital "micro-network," Cartoon Network Anything, which will include new short form—very short-form, like 10-15 seconds—content optimized for mobile viewing. It's where the network will be pushing its ad sales the hardest, from the sound of the statement: Network reps touted "unique sponsorship opportunities for Cartoon Network’s business partners" and called it "a perfect platform for native advertising," which has been a very successful strategy for Adult Swim. "Cartoon Network Anything invites innovative advertising and sponsored content that suits the medium and that will feel organic to the overall micro-network," the statement said. CN has a new version of the Tom & Jerry Show in the works, along with Wabbit—A Looney Tunes Production (a Bugs Bunny series), Be Cool Scooby-Doo (self-evident), Sonic Boom (following Sonic the Hedgehog), and two shows with toy company tie-ins—Lego's Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitsu and Takara Tomy's Beyraiderz, an anime series that features toys sold in the U.S

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HBO GO Craps Out During True Detective Finale

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It’s not TV, it’s HBO GO —but for many fans of the series True Detective , it was more like HBO NO GO. The season finale of the Matthew McConaughey-Woody Harrelson procedural aired on HBO Sunday night at 9 p.m. EDT, but viewers hoping to watch it via the network’s online service were out of luck. The live stream crashed shortly after the linear telecast began, and many users took to Twitter to report that the loading screen stalled out altogether. Echoing the Nietzschean musings of McConaughey’s tormented ex-cop Rustin Coehl , one True Detective enthusiast noted that “Time is a flat circle,” much like HBO GO’s loading symbol. At 9:50 p.m. EDT, or 10 minutes before the finale wrapped, HBO GO chalked up the balky service to “overwhelmingly popular demand,” before asking subscribers to

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HBO GO Craps Out During True Detective Finale

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It’s not TV, it’s HBO GO —but for many fans of the series True Detective , it was more like HBO NO GO. The season finale of the Matthew McConaughey-Woody Harrelson procedural aired on HBO Sunday night at 9 p.m. EDT, but viewers hoping to watch it via the network’s online service were out of luck. The live stream crashed shortly after the linear telecast began, and many users took to Twitter to report that the loading screen stalled out altogether. Echoing the Nietzschean musings of McConaughey’s tormented ex-cop Rustin Coehl , one True Detective enthusiast noted that “Time is a flat circle,” much like HBO GO’s loading symbol. At 9:50 p.m. EDT, or 10 minutes before the finale wrapped, HBO GO chalked up the balky service to “overwhelmingly popular demand,” before asking subscribers to

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A Look at What the Broadcast TV Networks Have in Store for 2014-15

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

“Time is a flat circle. Everything we’ve ever done or will do, we’re gonna do over and over and over again.” —Rustin Cohle While his musings have more to do with Nietzsche than Nielsen, True Detective’s nihilist ex-cop just as easily could have been inveighing against the infernal hamster wheel that is broadcast TV’s development process. Two-thirds of the way through another unremarkable season, the pilots designed to replace the failures of 2013-14 are a familiar stew of cop shows, bland comedies and spinoffs. And yet, hope springs eternal … Poised to win its first seasonal ratings crown in 10 years, NBC is still struggling with its Thursday night comedy lineup. All three newcomers have been shuttered, but with 19 sitcom pilots in the hopper, the Peacock has plenty of options. The twin comedy suns that light NBC’s corner of the universe are represented in Tina Fey’s Tooken and Amy Poehler’s Old Soul ; along with a Craig Robinson vehicle and Rob Lowe’s turn as a tennis hustler. These are the only projects that deviate from the cookie-cutter relationship comedy template. On the drama front, the resurrected CBS pilot Babylon Fields could bring NBC’s Wednesday 8 p.m. slot back from the dead. Speaking of CBS , the Eye Network once again has few weak spots to shore up, as it is expected to renew the vast majority of its lineup. (As CBS Corp. CEO Les Moonves said last week, “The problem with our new development is, where do you put it all?”) Having secured the rights to the new Thursday Night Football package , CBS has a powerful new vehicle with which to promote its ailing Monday 10 p.m. slot. Look for Vince Gilligan’s Battle Creek and an untitled Wall Street drama from Taylor Elmore (Justified) and John Cusack to help level the playing field. Fox entertainment chairman Kevin Reilly has made good on his promise to scrap the insanely inefficient custom that is pilot season, jumping straight into seven series orders. Among these are the Batman prequel Gotham, which could make for a nice fit on Monday nights with the returning Sleepy Hollow , and the Rainn Wilson detective strip, Backstrom. Seth MacFarlane, John Mulaney and Fey have comedies in the works for next season when Fox will have as many as six-and-a-half hours to fill each week.

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