Posts Tagged ‘business’

How 4 Multichannel Networks Plan to Attract Millennial Viewers

April 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

By now, it's a given that millennials—some of them having cut the cord, others never having had a cord to cut—are consuming an unprecedented crush of video content on a growing array of platforms and devices. And while appointment viewing is largely a thing of the past, it is also accepted that the bond that audiences, notably younger ones, have forged with content creators found on YouTube, Vine, Instagram and beyond is infinitely more unbreakable than their parents' affinity for the likes of, say, Jerry Seinfeld or the cast of Melrose Place or any other TV star from the past you'd care to name. Multichannel networks, built on the power and reach of YouTube and serving as a bridge between creators and brands craving to reach this base of young, hard-core fans, now constitute a 5-year-old ecosystem, one that finds itself all grown-up and yet as always remains in search of the latest, greatest ways to produce and distribute high-quality content—and of course, the next big video star. And their appeal goes way beyond the screen. Take Twaimz , one of the creators for network Fullscreen. Not only do his videos log millions of views, but his recent tour of the U.S. sold out 22 dates, says Fullscreen founder and CEO George Strompolos. "Why is this happening?" he asks. "He has caught the hearts and minds of an audience." On the eve of the annual Digital Content NewFronts where the freshest programming ideas will get pitched and some $3 billion in ad business will be up for grabs, Adweek caught up with Strompolos and top executives from Maker Studios , Defy Media and Studio71 (formerly Collective Digital Studio) to learn about the issues they face as they chase coveted millennial consumers and talent, and all those advertiser dollars. What would you say is the biggest issue you face heading into the NewFronts? George Strompolos: [Millennials] are watching less and less TV every year, but that doesn't mean that they're not consuming entertainment. If you're an advertiser that's used to spending all this money to reach customers and sell products, you're kind of scratching your head and saying, "Where do I belong?" It's our job to translate that and make it easier for a marketer to reach a customer in those new ways

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How FX Bids for New Series Without the Big Budget of Netflix

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snap up original series away from linear networks, as well as lure creators with big paydays and promises of creative autonomy, their competitors have had to alter their approaches to bidding for new projects. One of those is FX, which lost out on the bidding for Aziz Ansari's comedy Master of None and the upcoming drama The Crown. Both of those shows went to Netflix after the streaming service "overwhelmed us with shock and awe levels of money and commitment," FX CEO John Landgraf told reporters in January . He also used a "Moneyball" analogy when comparing FX to Netflix, explaining, "Basically, we're competing against payrolls, if you will, a la the Oakland A's and New York Yankees, that are three or four times ours." Because he can't match Netflix dollar for dollar, Landgraf has shifted the focus of his pitches, highlighting other attributes of the network when bidding for shows. Landgraf highlights his marketing team, which has been named PromaxBDA's In-House Marketing Team of the Year for five consecutive years. "I think the talent appreciates that," he told Adweek. Landgraf also emphasizes the personal touch and attention he can give FX's shows versus Netflix, which now has 100 series in the pipeline—55 for adults, 45 for children. "Our network is more of a bespoke organization than a factory. We're at about 18 shows, and that's the most that I can personally pay attention to," said Landgraf. While he could maybe do as many as 20, "I'm at the max in terms of being able to read scripts, watch rough cuts, have a thoughtful input and dialogue." And that's important, even when the network doesn't have much creative feedback in terms of notes for producers. Landgraf said that his deal with Louis CK for Louie specified that the network wasn't able to give him notes.

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Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.

February 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 52 Claim to fame Star of Bravo's The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Base Los Angeles Twitter @l isarinna Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Lisa Rinna: I wake up and I get the kids ready for school, and I turn on the local NBC news or CNN. I read the New York Post and then I go to the Daily Mail. Then I will check Instagram. I no longer check Twitter because I hire somebody to do that. It's become so negative while I'm doing the show. Like your recent Twitter war with ex-Housewife Brandi Glanville

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Turner Says the Post-Millennial Generation Should Be Known as ‘Plurals’

January 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Millennials are quickly becoming yesterday's news, and media companies are trying to figure out just what to call the next generation. Becomers? Founders? iGen? Post-Millennials? Those are just a few. And now Turner has another: Plurals. So how does Turner describe Plurals? They are born after 1997. They are the most diverse generation in U.S. history.

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This Is What Business as Usual Looks Like at CBS, Even With a New President

January 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. That was the overall theme of new CBS Entertainment president Glenn Geller's first executive session with reporters at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour. Geller, who was at CBS for 14 years before taking over as president, echoed the same sentiments of dominance and stability as his predecessor, Nina Tassler, who announced in September that she would be stepping down as chairman at the end of 2015. Despite a decline in linear ratings, "more people are watching CBS shows than they did 15 years ago," Geller said. With multiplatform viewing factored in, CBS draws an average of 13.2 million viewers, a 6 percent increase over the linear-only average of 12.5 million in the 2000-2001 season. "CBS's ability to build a big audience distinguishes our brand in all parts of our business," said Geller. "We saw the marketplace turn around in the third quarter of 2015. it gained strength in the fourth quarter, and it's currently very strong in the first quarter of 2016.

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For Hallmark Channel, Christmas Is the Most Wonderful (and Lucrative) Time of the Year

November 30, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Now that Thanksgiving is over, most networks are preparing to roll out their Christmas-themed shows and specials for December. But Hallmark Channel is way ahead of them. The cable network's annual Countdown to Christmas, which features 55 straight days of round-the-clock holiday programming and more than 1,300 hours of content, has been going strong since Halloween. In its fifth year, Countdown to Christmas is bigger than ever for the family-friendly network, which is debuting 17 original holiday-themed movies (with titles like Angel of Christmas and Merry Matrimony), up from 12 last year. An additional four movies will premiere on sister network Hallmark Movies & Mysteries. "It's not just about the holiday programming because anybody could put that on 24-7," said Bill Abbott, president and CEO for Crown Media Family Networks. "It's the fact that our brand is so strong. Like ESPN is synonymous to sports, Hallmark is synonymous to the holidays." Christmas aficionados certainly agree. In 2014, Hallmark Channel was the No. 1 cable network in total day in households and women 25-54 for the duration of Countdown to Christmas, and last December was the network's highest-rated month ever in prime time in both women and adults 25-54. Last year's film Christmas Under Wraps was the top-rated telecast in Hallmark history, attracting 5.8 million viewers.

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How Superproducer Greg Berlanti Juggles 6 (and Counting) TV Shows

November 29, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Anybody who thinks broadcast television is dying obviously hasn't met Greg Berlanti , the talented and prolific writer and superproducer behind this fall's two biggest freshman series among viewers 18-49. First, there's NBC's Blindspot , which the network has already renewed for a second season. Then, there's Supergirl on CBS, Berlanti's third superhero series along with the CW's The Flash (that network's most-watched show ever) and Arrow. (A fourth superhero project, the Flash/Arrow spinoff DC's Legends of Tomorrow, will debut Jan. 21.) As if that weren't enough on his plate, he's also got The Mysteries of Laura, NBC's sole freshman series from last season to make it to a second year. Berlanti, Adweek's TV Producer of the Year, never intended to oversee six TV shows at once (he serves as co-showrunner on the four superhero series and is executive producer of Blindspot and Laura). "It's a combination of a lot of past relationships coming to fruition—and, as always in this business, luck," says Berlanti, who delegates many duties to key allies like Sarah Schechter, who runs his production company, but maintains strict control over each show's essential elements. "I find I can affect the quality of an episode if I focus on the things that I've always enjoyed the most: What are the stories, who's acting in them and the finished cut," he says. Juggling six TV shows requires "a lot of time management," notes Berlanti, who begins every day writing scripts ("My morning time is my most creative," he relates) before transitioning to making notes on other writers' scripts and "breaking" story arcs for upcoming episodes. After that, he shifts his attention to casting and budget matters, before ending the day in the editing room "because I don't have to use my brain in quite the same way," he says. "It's more reactive than trying to generate something." Berlanti employs the same mantra for all his projects: "Heart. Humor. Spectacle." "My favorite episodes of TV as a viewer, and certainly as a writer or producer, have those elements," he explains. "The humor keeps the episodes enjoyable and reminds you that not everything has to be deadly serious. Heart is something that I've always led with when I've written, or responded to in other people's stories. And the spectacle can be the emotional spectacle, or it can be the visual effects and action of it all." The producer, who previously worked on the WB's Dawson's Creek and Everwood and ABC's Brothers and Sisters, continues to create smashes for broadcast television even as many of his writer-producer peers have turned to cable channels and streaming sites. "To me, there's still nothing more thrilling than, every week, people getting to see another chapter in this story that you're telling," says Berlanti, who recently extended his lucrative TV deal with Warner Bros. through 2020. Berlanti's phenomenal success seems to surprise him as much as anyone.

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Presidential Hopefuls Ask for Equal Airtime After Donald Trump’s SNL Gig

November 16, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This was inevitable. Following Donald Trump's hosting stint on the Nov. 7 episode of Saturday Night Live, three Republican presidential hopefuls have requested equal time on NBC stations. According to the FCC's "equal time" rule, broadcast and radio stations are required to offer an equivalent opportunity for candidates to appear on non-news programs. NBC tallied up Trump's airtime at 12 minutes and five seconds. Opposing candidates then had seven days following Trump's SNL episode to request that amount of time on NBC stations. And three of them have: former New York Gov

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The Average Viewer of Last Night’s GOP Debate Lost Interest After Just One Hour

October 29, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Last night's GOP presidential debate on CNBC—in which the moderators got more attention than the candidates — was watched by 14 million people . While that's a record audience for CNBC, it's significantly lower than the 24 million viewers who watched the first Republican debate on Fox News in August, and the 23.1 million who tuned in to CNN for the second debate last month. The Oct. 13 Democratic presidential debate, which also aired on CNN, was watched by 15.3 million. In addition to pulling in smaller numbers than the two previous GOP debates, last night's showdown was watched for the shortest amount of time,according to data from Samba TV, the social TV analytics platform. Samba tracked debate viewership over five-minute intervals, and found that the average viewer tuned in to only 60 minutes of last night's debate, compared to 71 minutes for the first debate, which was also two hours

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Q&A: Why the Founder of NY Comic Con Is Bringing YouTube Stars to Agencies’ Backyard

October 29, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Look out New York, here comes GloZell, as well as Grace Helbig, Mamrie Hart, Joey Graceffa, iJustine and Connor Franta. The stars of social video will gather in the Big Apple this weekend for the first annual Stream Con . The three-day convention, from the people who brought Comic Con to New York, will kick off Friday at the Jacob Javits Center with an Industry Summit , followed by fan events and a "creator camp" throughout the weekend. Event producer Greg Topalian, president of LeftField Media, spoke with Adweek about the goals of Stream Con and the inspiration from its West Coast cousin. Adweek: Why did you decide to start up Stream Con? Topalian: I couldn't believe that New York City didn't have an event that was a 'con' really dedicated to the YouTube, Vine, Snapchat space. We knew the fan demand was there, but the piece that got really exciting was realizing the business behind it. The ad dollars are flowing towards digital. There are certainly plenty of conferences that talk about the digital revolution and social influencers. We felt like there was an opportunity to combine that type of content but also in a fan-friendly environment. Your events are very fan focused, so how do you tailor that experience towards the business audience? We had a lot of conversations with brands and agencies upfront to say: "What do you want? What do you actually want this to be?" What we heard over and over was, "We're not looking for the big philosophical overview. Get down in the weeds, give us case studies and introduce us to the talent." It was a lot of "We know this is big, we know this is moving, there is not a client on our roster that's not asking about this. Get us the details and connect us with the right people." There is already a major online video conference, VidCon, that takes place in Anaheim, Calif. each summer.

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