Posts Tagged ‘business’

Fox Is Rebuilding Its Slate, One Hit at a Time

March 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As co-chairman and co-CEO of Fox Television Group, Dana Walden, alongside partner Gary Newman, now oversees both Fox Broadcasting Company and 20th Century Fox Television, which Walden (who started there in 1992) has run with Newman since 1999. But when she and Newman took over the network last summer, replacing Kevin Reilly, who stepped down shortly after the Fox upfront last May, they received a baptism by fire. Aside from Gotham, audiences rejected all of Fox's new fall shows, including Utopia, Mulaney, Red Band Society and Gracepoint. Then, hip-hop drama Empire, from Walden's studio, wiped the slate clean in January, becoming the biggest new series in decades, with an unprecedented seven consecutive weeks of audience growth and an 18-49 rating of 5.4. The show has helped pull Fox from a distant fourth in 18-49 this season to a tie for third with ABC. Walden—who jokes that she handles the "fun stuff" (i.e., creative issues) while Newman gets the "hard stuff" (business issues)—talked about surviving Fox's fall to forget and how she'll capitalize on Empire's success. Did you have any idea that last fall was going to be as rough as it was? Yes. Going in, Gary and I always anticipated that this was going to be a really tough fall. We were encouraged by Gotham , encouraged by Sunday night. I felt like our job as the new leaders was to stay focused on the positive momentum and point to things that establish what we wanted to do in the future. That was a far better approach than being mired in how demoralizing the overnights can be. You and Gary have been in the new job for seven months. How has it been working out managing your network and studio hats

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NBCU Wants To Get Into Business With TV Anchors Like Mika Brzezinski

February 18, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

 Mika Brzezinski is best known as one of the two hosts of MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” but that network’s corporate parent just recognized her as a budding entrepreneur – and formed a business venture with her. NBCUniversal News Group and Brzezinski will hold stakes in an operation in which the anchor will host a day-long event in... Read more

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5 Delicious Questions for Tom Colicchio About His New Gig at MSNBC

February 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Big news from MSNBC this morning: Celebrity chef Tom Colicchio will become the network's first food correspondent and debut two new shows. Stirring the Pot will air on the network's new digital channel, Shift, and Everybody Eats will air on MSNBC and feature Colicchio taking influential folks to lunch. He'll also contribute reports to other shows on the network. We asked him five questions about the new gig (not counting "why does my 'Wichcraft sandwich disappear so quickly?"). Adweek: What are you looking forward to talking about in this new role? Colicchio: Just starting a conversation around food. I think, in more ways than people are aware of, there are issues around food safety, around transparency in the food system, obviously hunger—there are so many things to bump up against. There's a lot of television celebrating food, but I think people are ready for a different kind of conversation. How important is the affordability of good food? More and more so, I think. This isn't about the elite being able to eat organic food. That's fine, but we need to start talking about health and health in eating. We should start with a different baseline and look at the affordability of healthier foods, and that brings you right to policy, because then you look at what we're supporting with subsidies. If a head of broccoli or a peach is more expensive than a fast-food burger, I don't know if we're supporting the right things. How would changing subsidies to encourage healthy eating work? There's plenty of noise out there about limiting the soft drinks you can purchase—but let's actually incentivize people to do the right thing, which you typically do with price. It's very easy to demonize somebody for making that decision, but you need to look at it from a different angle

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How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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How Are These 13 Classic TV Shows Still Not on Streaming?

February 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix struck a streaming coup last month when it added every episode of Friends, then scored another win this month by adding the first five seasons of MASH. So what's left? A surprising number of modern classics are still padlocked under pay-per-episode arrangements, meaning they could (and likely will) still come to streaming services like Netflix, Hulu or Crackle. Some of the most highly demanded shows still airing—The Simpsons and Game of Thrones, say—are already available on streaming for those with cable subscriptions. But that still leaves many programs up for negotiation. Such discussions are, of course, usually kept quite secret, so we (Adweek digital managing editor David Griner and TV writer Sam Thielman) decided to create out own wishlist. Check it out below and let usk now which shows you'd most want added. 13. Saved by the Bell Sam Thielman:

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Viacom Is Trying Something New for Cable Upfront Season

February 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When the head of a major cable conglomerate calls ratings falloff "an important secular issue," it may be time to look for solutions outside traditional channels, and that's exactly what Viacom's ad sales team is doing. That remark, by the way, was made by Viacom president and CEO Philippe Dauman on the company's Q1 earnings call last week, and it's an important observation. Viewing habits are changing, and gross rating points are getting less and less desirable as network content flows through multiple, unmeasured channels. That hurts ad dollars. "Inadequate measurement undermines innovation and disproportionately impacts ... multiplatform experiences that viewers demand," Dauman told investors. "While it is currently a reality of our business, at Viacom we are not waiting for change." At client-only presentations in New York last month, Viacom laid out its upfront season pitch to offer more to (and hopefully get more from) its advertiser base.

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TV Apps Were Supposed to Keep People Subscribed to Cable, But They’re Creating Confusion Instead

January 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

First the good news from the TV Everywhere panel at the Television Critics Association's semiannual confab in Los Angeles today: TVE usage—the percentage of cable subscribers who have verified to watch content from a network or cable provider over a digital service or app—is at 49 percent as of the last measurements taken, up from 43 percent last April, with a goal of 55 percent by the end of 2015. And now the bad news. While usage is increasing, all execs remained frustrated by Nielsen's inability to measure those TVE audiences. Mark Garner, svp distribution, A+E Networks , noted that the measurement abilities "lag behind the technology" to such a degree that they have become "harmful to this business." As a result, "you're looking at numbers that don't really tell the whole story" because they don't account for TVE viewing, said Erik Flannigan, evp multiplatform strategy and development, Viacom Entertainment Group. Worse, Garner said a major problem facing the industry was that most consumers still think "that TV Everywhere is an additional thing they have to pay for." Alex Wellen, chief product officer, CNN Digital, pointed out that when audiences stream CNN during breaking news, that data is not being measured. The data "is lagging to the point where it's become frustrating," said Brad Dancer, svp program planning & research, National Geographic Channel, who said that there should be headway in the next 12 months. Ratings issues aside, there are other barriers that are preventing wider-spread TVE usage among cable subscribers. The requirement for consumers to individually authenticate every network app is "clearly an issue," especially for those who haven't yet sampled TVE, said Flannigan, who hopes that situation will improve within in the next two years. At the very least, he noted, authentication in one's home should be able to be done automatically via "sniffing" out that subscriber's cable network. Flannigan characterized the much-fretted-over millennial market not as uninterested, but as "underserved." That's also why the concern about TVE will encourage subscribers to share their passwords with non-subscribers (or their twentysomething kids) is "overblown," said A+E's Garner, who noted that most people are wary of exposing their credit card and other personal data with those shared passwords. "People are willing to pay for things if we make it easier," he said.

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