Posts Tagged ‘business’

Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision

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CP+B Veterans Launch New Miami-Based Agency Markham & Stein

May 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Despite talk of the end of the advertising agency business model, former CP+B executives Jeff Steinhour and Markham Cronin think small to mid-sized creative shops can thrive as long as they focus on producing great creative above all else. The duo, who have more than 50 years of advertising experience between them, felt so strongly about the viability of this narrative that they launched their own full-service agency in Miami in the form of Markham & Stein. "This thing has been a long time coming," said Cronin, who officially opens the new shop with his partner today. After leaving CP+B and leading creative at other agencies, he opened his own operation Markham Unlimited in 2005. But Cronin tells Adweek, "I was spending 20 percent of my time doing the valuable part of my job for clients and the other 80 percent actually running the agency. So when the opportunity came to talk to Jeff about maybe doing this, there was no question it was something we should try and do together." Markham and Steinhour spent 10 years together at CP+B on the creative and accounts sides of the business, respectively.

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Hulu Is Targeting Living Room Viewers With New Interactive Advertising Deals

May 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hulu spent much of last year improving the quality of its content and striking big deals for new and acquired series like Casual, Difficult People, The Mindy Project, 11.22.63 and all nine seasons of Seinfeld. This year, the streaming service is focusing on improving the experience of watching that content, especially in the comfort of viewers' own homes. Hulu's subscriber base has grown more than 30 percent from last year, and will reach 12 million U.S. subscribers by this month. "Hulu is TV, and the fact that 70 percent of our viewing happens in a living room environment just reinforces that idea to the market," said Peter Naylor, svp of advertising sales with Hulu. That's why many of the company's big announcements at Wednesday morning's NewFronts event at the Theater at Madison Square Garden center around initiatives relating to what Naylor calls the "living room," but refer to any viewing via connected TV devices like Roku, Apple TV, PlayStation or smart TVs. Hulu has teamed with interactive advertising company BrightLine to bring interactive advertising to connected TV devices for the first time. Havas Media will be the exclusive charter agency for the new ads, which debut on Hulu this summer. It will allow viewers to interact with the creative itself much as they would on a computer or mobile device. They can click on the ad and be taken to a site or page with details about a particular brand

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Home Depot’s CMO Trish Mueller Resigns After 5 Years in the Top Marketing Role

April 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Trish Mueller has stepped down as chief marketing officer at Home Depot after nearly seven years with the Atlanta-based company. Director of corporate communications Stephen Holmes confirmed to Adweek today that Mueller announced her resignation approximately two weeks ago and that she has been replaced by president of online operations Kevin Hofmann, who will hold both titles. In a statement, Mueller said, "It was an honor and a privilege to work at The Home Depot as CMO for the past 5 years!" She added, "For now, I have decided to take some time off to consider what's next, but I will always 'bleed orange' and be grateful for working for, in my opinion, the best retailer in America." Mueller became vice president of advertising at Home Depot in 2009 after serving as svp of marketing and advertising at Sports Authority. She was promoted to CMO in 2011. Earlier in her career, she held similar positions at retailers including Montgomery Ward, ShopNBC and American Signature-Value City. She has also been an independent director on the board of Dave & Buster's since 2015. Hofmann joined the chain in 2006 as a vice president leading its technology teams with a focus on ecommerce, supply-chain transformation and international operations. He was later promoted to vp of Home Depot's installation division before being promoted again to lead all aspects of its online business in 2013. He previously spent a decade at GE in various leadership positions handling technology, social networking, business intelligence, renewable energy and other corporate functions after working for eight years in research, manufacturing and technology with Dow Chemical.

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Put Away the Selfie Stick and Live Like a Local, Urges Airbnb’s New Campaign

April 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Travelers today, especially those using Airbnb to find lodging around the world, don't want to navigate throngs of other tourists for a glimpse of Times Square or Fisherman's Wharf. According to data from Airbnb, 86 percent of its users pick the platform because they want to live more like a local. That insight of living rather than visiting inspired the brand's latest and largest marketing campaign, "Live There." "Don't go to Paris. Don't tour Paris, and please don't do Paris," the ad's narrator advises over footage of selfie sticks and packed tour boats. Instead, the ad advises, "Live in Paris." The work, from agency TBWAChiatDay is aimed at younger travelers, or at least those young in spirit. It's focused not just on the millennial generation, but also on those who want to eat at local restaurants, meet local artists and avoid tourist traps. According to Airbnb, 52 percent of these younger-minded U.S. travelers find crowds at major tourist attractions to be more stressful than doing a tax return, while 47 percent don't like to be labeled as tourists when they go to a new place. With that in mind, Airbnb CMO Jonathan Mildenhall said he wanted the brand's latest work to push back against the modern tourism industry and capture the idea that people shouldn't simply go to a new place, they should live there, even if only for one night

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This Media Network Is Taking Its Storytelling Directly to Advertisers

April 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As a young man, digital media executive JuanMa Rowland suffered a debilitating head injury. Though he didn't know it at the time, that traumatic event opened up a world of opportunity. It allowed him to recognize patterns and, he says, tell stories with more precision. Now fully recovered, Rowland, as Azteca's StoryMaker—that's his job title—is turning adversity into advertising. Through the Azteca GlassWorks content studio, Rowland and his team of 10 creators and futurists will "tell very local, very direct stories that brands want to talk about. ... It's a completely different approach of how the upfronts work," Rowland said.

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How 4 Multichannel Networks Plan to Attract Millennial Viewers

April 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

By now, it's a given that millennials—some of them having cut the cord, others never having had a cord to cut—are consuming an unprecedented crush of video content on a growing array of platforms and devices. And while appointment viewing is largely a thing of the past, it is also accepted that the bond that audiences, notably younger ones, have forged with content creators found on YouTube, Vine, Instagram and beyond is infinitely more unbreakable than their parents' affinity for the likes of, say, Jerry Seinfeld or the cast of Melrose Place or any other TV star from the past you'd care to name. Multichannel networks, built on the power and reach of YouTube and serving as a bridge between creators and brands craving to reach this base of young, hard-core fans, now constitute a 5-year-old ecosystem, one that finds itself all grown-up and yet as always remains in search of the latest, greatest ways to produce and distribute high-quality content—and of course, the next big video star. And their appeal goes way beyond the screen. Take Twaimz , one of the creators for network Fullscreen. Not only do his videos log millions of views, but his recent tour of the U.S. sold out 22 dates, says Fullscreen founder and CEO George Strompolos. "Why is this happening?" he asks. "He has caught the hearts and minds of an audience." On the eve of the annual Digital Content NewFronts where the freshest programming ideas will get pitched and some $3 billion in ad business will be up for grabs, Adweek caught up with Strompolos and top executives from Maker Studios , Defy Media and Studio71 (formerly Collective Digital Studio) to learn about the issues they face as they chase coveted millennial consumers and talent, and all those advertiser dollars. What would you say is the biggest issue you face heading into the NewFronts? George Strompolos: [Millennials] are watching less and less TV every year, but that doesn't mean that they're not consuming entertainment. If you're an advertiser that's used to spending all this money to reach customers and sell products, you're kind of scratching your head and saying, "Where do I belong?" It's our job to translate that and make it easier for a marketer to reach a customer in those new ways

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How FX Bids for New Series Without the Big Budget of Netflix

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snap up original series away from linear networks, as well as lure creators with big paydays and promises of creative autonomy, their competitors have had to alter their approaches to bidding for new projects. One of those is FX, which lost out on the bidding for Aziz Ansari's comedy Master of None and the upcoming drama The Crown. Both of those shows went to Netflix after the streaming service "overwhelmed us with shock and awe levels of money and commitment," FX CEO John Landgraf told reporters in January . He also used a "Moneyball" analogy when comparing FX to Netflix, explaining, "Basically, we're competing against payrolls, if you will, a la the Oakland A's and New York Yankees, that are three or four times ours." Because he can't match Netflix dollar for dollar, Landgraf has shifted the focus of his pitches, highlighting other attributes of the network when bidding for shows. Landgraf highlights his marketing team, which has been named PromaxBDA's In-House Marketing Team of the Year for five consecutive years. "I think the talent appreciates that," he told Adweek. Landgraf also emphasizes the personal touch and attention he can give FX's shows versus Netflix, which now has 100 series in the pipeline—55 for adults, 45 for children. "Our network is more of a bespoke organization than a factory. We're at about 18 shows, and that's the most that I can personally pay attention to," said Landgraf. While he could maybe do as many as 20, "I'm at the max in terms of being able to read scripts, watch rough cuts, have a thoughtful input and dialogue." And that's important, even when the network doesn't have much creative feedback in terms of notes for producers. Landgraf said that his deal with Louis CK for Louie specified that the network wasn't able to give him notes.

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Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.

February 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 52 Claim to fame Star of Bravo's The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Base Los Angeles Twitter @l isarinna Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Lisa Rinna: I wake up and I get the kids ready for school, and I turn on the local NBC news or CNN. I read the New York Post and then I go to the Daily Mail. Then I will check Instagram. I no longer check Twitter because I hire somebody to do that. It's become so negative while I'm doing the show. Like your recent Twitter war with ex-Housewife Brandi Glanville

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Turner Says the Post-Millennial Generation Should Be Known as ‘Plurals’

January 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Millennials are quickly becoming yesterday's news, and media companies are trying to figure out just what to call the next generation. Becomers? Founders? iGen? Post-Millennials? Those are just a few. And now Turner has another: Plurals. So how does Turner describe Plurals? They are born after 1997. They are the most diverse generation in U.S. history.

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