Posts Tagged ‘business’

How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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How Are These 13 Classic TV Shows Still Not on Streaming?

February 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix struck a streaming coup last month when it added every episode of Friends, then scored another win this month by adding the first five seasons of MASH. So what's left? A surprising number of modern classics are still padlocked under pay-per-episode arrangements, meaning they could (and likely will) still come to streaming services like Netflix, Hulu or Crackle. Some of the most highly demanded shows still airing—The Simpsons and Game of Thrones, say—are already available on streaming for those with cable subscriptions. But that still leaves many programs up for negotiation. Such discussions are, of course, usually kept quite secret, so we (Adweek digital managing editor David Griner and TV writer Sam Thielman) decided to create out own wishlist. Check it out below and let usk now which shows you'd most want added. 13. Saved by the Bell Sam Thielman:

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Viacom Is Trying Something New for Cable Upfront Season

February 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When the head of a major cable conglomerate calls ratings falloff "an important secular issue," it may be time to look for solutions outside traditional channels, and that's exactly what Viacom's ad sales team is doing. That remark, by the way, was made by Viacom president and CEO Philippe Dauman on the company's Q1 earnings call last week, and it's an important observation. Viewing habits are changing, and gross rating points are getting less and less desirable as network content flows through multiple, unmeasured channels. That hurts ad dollars. "Inadequate measurement undermines innovation and disproportionately impacts ... multiplatform experiences that viewers demand," Dauman told investors. "While it is currently a reality of our business, at Viacom we are not waiting for change." At client-only presentations in New York last month, Viacom laid out its upfront season pitch to offer more to (and hopefully get more from) its advertiser base.

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TV Apps Were Supposed to Keep People Subscribed to Cable, But They’re Creating Confusion Instead

January 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

First the good news from the TV Everywhere panel at the Television Critics Association's semiannual confab in Los Angeles today: TVE usage—the percentage of cable subscribers who have verified to watch content from a network or cable provider over a digital service or app—is at 49 percent as of the last measurements taken, up from 43 percent last April, with a goal of 55 percent by the end of 2015. And now the bad news. While usage is increasing, all execs remained frustrated by Nielsen's inability to measure those TVE audiences. Mark Garner, svp distribution, A+E Networks , noted that the measurement abilities "lag behind the technology" to such a degree that they have become "harmful to this business." As a result, "you're looking at numbers that don't really tell the whole story" because they don't account for TVE viewing, said Erik Flannigan, evp multiplatform strategy and development, Viacom Entertainment Group. Worse, Garner said a major problem facing the industry was that most consumers still think "that TV Everywhere is an additional thing they have to pay for." Alex Wellen, chief product officer, CNN Digital, pointed out that when audiences stream CNN during breaking news, that data is not being measured. The data "is lagging to the point where it's become frustrating," said Brad Dancer, svp program planning & research, National Geographic Channel, who said that there should be headway in the next 12 months. Ratings issues aside, there are other barriers that are preventing wider-spread TVE usage among cable subscribers. The requirement for consumers to individually authenticate every network app is "clearly an issue," especially for those who haven't yet sampled TVE, said Flannigan, who hopes that situation will improve within in the next two years. At the very least, he noted, authentication in one's home should be able to be done automatically via "sniffing" out that subscriber's cable network. Flannigan characterized the much-fretted-over millennial market not as uninterested, but as "underserved." That's also why the concern about TVE will encourage subscribers to share their passwords with non-subscribers (or their twentysomething kids) is "overblown," said A+E's Garner, who noted that most people are wary of exposing their credit card and other personal data with those shared passwords. "People are willing to pay for things if we make it easier," he said.

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Fox News, Fox Business Removed From Dish In Carriage-Rights Spat

December 21, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Fox News Channel and Fox Business Network are not currently available on satellite-broadcaster Dish Network, the result of an impasse in carriage talks between the two companies. Dish said in a statement early Sunday morning that 21st Century Fox had blocked access to the two networks after Dish balked when rates for other networks owned... Read more

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Los Cabos Finance Panel: TV Funding, Brands Drive Conversation

November 16, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Los Cabos, Mexico — The film finance conversation seems to be finally moving on from hand-wringing over the shrinking parts of the business to digging into new models of funding projects. The beginnings of film distribution and financing merging with the TV business, alternatives to theatrical and brands funding projects were a few of the fresh themes that emerged... Read more

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Infographic: The Evolution of TV Over the Last 20 Years

October 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While the storytelling medium of a television show may not have changed much, the way people tune in to their favorite programs has. Just 20 years ago, the patent for the first Internet-connected TV was filed in France. This year, more than 110 million U.S. adults watch a digital program using a connected TV. "Over the span of just 20 years, the experience of watching TV and the business of advertising on TV have changed significantly," Videology CEO Scott Ferber said. "This year,

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Broadway Box Office: Business Surges with ‘Curious Incident’ Off to Good Start

September 15, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Broadway bounced back from its annual post-Labor Day downturn last week, gaining steam in a frame that added three new shows — including the transfer of London hit “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” — and saw the return of one more. September is usually a fallow time on the Main Stem thanks... Read more

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