Posts Tagged ‘business’

Viacom Gets a Face-Lift for the Millennial Generation

September 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As one of the most storied holding companies in media, Viacom's network of brands like MTV, VH1, Comedy Central and Nickelodeon oversees, curates and even dictates youth culture—and has done so for decades. But being young and hip takes work, which is why New York-based Viacom recently renovated its 31st and 32nd floors into spaces where people—employees and guests—could meet, mingle, work, dine and relax. "Our new floors are a working prototype for the future of media," said marketing strategy and engagement evp Ross Martin, whose office is on the 32nd floor, "where creative talent, world-class data scientists and visionary thought leaders are engineering the future of our business." On the 31st floor, visitors will find the "pitch theater," meeting rooms, open lounges and gathering spaces. "As a result of its advanced design form and tech function, we have allowed numerous CEO and CMO partners to utilize the space for their top leadership teams," said Viacom marketing and partner solutions head Sean Moran. "It's become the TRL for C-suite partners." Like its media network, the new Viacom space aims to please staffers and visitors—regardless of generational gap.

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Clio Lifetime Achievement Award Winner Wants to See More Diversity in the Industry

September 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig President, Kaplan Thaler Productions Previous gig Chairman, Publicis Kaplan Thaler Twitter @lindathaler2 You're being honored with a Clio Lifetime Achievement Award this year. Do you remember winning your first Clio? I don't remember the first Clio I won, but I do remember the year I won four. One, I wrote the music and lyrics for "Kodak America," then French's mustard won two. I won for best comedy writing and then we won for a Burger King commercial. I was fairly young at the time and hadn't been in the ad business very long, so I was really thrilled. It was incredible. After stepping down as chairman of Publicis Kaplan Thaler early this year, what have you been working on? I had been doing public speaking for several years off and on, but I decided to leave advertising this past February and be a speaker full time across the country, talking about a variety of topics. I love it because it's a combination of me being able to give stories and insights and empowerment to people as well as my theatrical desires because I never quite gave up wanting to perform. That's what I did in my 20s. I got to combine the two things and I love it. What does your latest book, Grit to Great , tackle? Robin Koval and I started The Kaplan Thaler Group about 20 years ago, and we are very proud of what we have accomplished. Along the way we decided to write books. Most recently we started looking at our success and realizing that neither of us are geniuses or incredibly talented, and we started researching really uber-successful people

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McDonald’s and Omnicom Refer to Their Dedicated Unit as an ‘Agency of the Present’

September 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On Monday, the first day of Advertising Week 2016, McDonald's chief marketing officer Deborah Wahl and DDB North America CEO Wendy Clark made it clear that they don't see Omnicom's unnamed, dedicated Chicago unit as an anomaly. "We say 'agency of the future,'" Clark told the crowd at New York's Town Hall, "but I think it's actually the agency of the present." Clark added that this sort of approach is "where we all need to be." The model in question is one in which Omnicom and McDonald's will operate together to an unprecedented degree, with the client's marketing team "embedded" within the agency. The scale of the pitch process was just as significant. "The important thing about the RFP is that it came in at the holding company level," Clark said, adding, "It was not just a couple of pages." She said Omnicom pulled its "best and brightest" from across almost 20 agencies to help win the business and that the disparate team worked on the pitch for 16 weeks. "It was breakneck, but it was good," she said. Neither Wahl nor Clark directly addressed the most controversial aspect of the documents McDonald's sent to the three biggest holding companies, its demand that all agency profits be tied to unspecified performance goals. "[McDonald's is] not only asking for a new agency model but doing it differently internally, too," Wahl said, adding, "Change is hard." She stated that while the agency structure was not necessarily developed with profit in mind, "there is a lot of room for growth [with] profit built in." Wahl also hinted at the reason for such an unusual arrangement: "I don't think anyone's budgets can go up dramatically unless their sales go up dramatically. We've got to get a lot smarter." In further emphasizing the theme of unity, Clark said the forthcoming agency's assignment would range from "anthemic TV spots to social posts, in-store advertising and employee communications." She said the ultimate goal of the shared enterprise is a greater focus on the consumer. "There's such a huge conversation about McDonald's always," Clark said. "We want to determine trends before they happen and see what's right for McDonald's." Wahl addressed a follow-up question about the dated social media "war room" model from moderator and Fast Company editor Eric Alt by again emphasizing scale. "Someone interacts with or reaches out to us once every two seconds," she said. "We are able to respond once every 10 seconds." Wahl said she hopes to speed up that response time moving forward, but Clark implied quality is ultimately the defining factor when it comes to content strategy. "Brands need to remember that they are uninvited guests [on social]," she said. "McDonald's is not in the business of mediocre." Clark also indicated that the new unit's vision regarding its own internal processes played a significant role in Omnicom's winning pitch. "If you get the process right, it sets you free. You never have to talk about it again."

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It’s Time for Marketers to Help Ease the Consumer Anxiety They’ve Helped Create

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

We're living in a time pervaded by fear. On one side of the current election , there's heavy conversation surrounding fear of immigrants, foreign powers, terrorism and the loss of what makes this country "great." The other side doesn't dispense that level of fear rhetoric, but they share a fair amount of social chatter about how it's simply all over for our nation and our future if the opposition wins. Jason Alan Snyder Headshot: Alex Fine And while we may condemn the fear both sides generate, marketers have to ask themselves what role they've played in setting the stage for this sort of national discussion. To what degree has our industry pushed for fear—and what can we do to turn things around? We have to acknowledge that as marketers, we have enabled, even encouraged, a persistent state of panic. And as a society, the technologies we are adopting are exaggerating this condition. I'm not saying it's right; I'm also not saying it's avoidable. This line of thinking is not an analysis of "crisis culture," or acceptance of it as a permanent state of being. Rather, we're acknowledging that crisis culture in marketing is real and pervasive. But I want to make clear that brands should genuinely help improve people's lives in the culture, despite the culture we have historically chosen to foster. This Means War (because everything means war). When I was born, in 1970, things were simpler. We only had wars where people killed each other. Then President Nixon declared a "war on drugs." This notion was later popularized and amplified by politics, media and marketing

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Time Inc.’s Matt Bean Returns to Rodale as Editor in Chief of Men’s Health

September 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Four years after leaving Rodale for Time Inc., Matt Bean is set to return to the Emmaus, Pa.-based magazine publisher with a shiny new title: editor in chief of Men's Health. "Matt is truly a modern day editor, savvy across print, digital and social platforms, with a clear vision for the Men's Health brand and a solid understanding of the business," Rodale chairman and CEO Maria Rodale said in a statement. "Matt is the Men's Health reader; his passion for and understanding of what men want and have come to expect from this brand is unparalleled. We are thrilled to have him back at Rodale." Bean first joined Men's Health back in 2004 as an associate editor, and by 2012, had been upped to vp, digital product development at Rodale. He was soon poached by Time Inc., becoming managing editor of SportsIllustrated.com, where he helped launch the brand's first daily live video series and a longform sportswriting platform. In 2014, Bean was named editor of Entertainment Weekly, but the gig lasted barely a year. (According to reports, Bean was ousted over disagreements with his predecessor, Jess Cagle, who had been named editorial director of EW and People. Cagle later denied those rumors, telling The Wrap that he had "never clashed" with Bean.) Bean stayed on at Time Inc., becoming svp of digital innovation and overseeing the creation of new verticals like The Drive and Extra Crispy

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Why Internet-Famous Dogs Are Fetching So Much Love From Brands

September 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Social media influencers have transformed the way brands interact with consumers—and a lot of those influencers aren't human. Like Super Bowl ads that use cute puppies to sell everything from beer to ketchup, adorable dogs with huge social followings are getting a lot of love from brands these days. Dogs can fetch anywhere from $2,000 to $10,000 per sponsored post on Instagram, according to Rob Schutz, vp of growth at Bark & Co., parent company of BarkBox, a service that sends treats and other products to dog owners every month. Bark & Co. works with brands like P&G's Swiffer, United Airlines, American Express and Anheuser-Busch to promote their products with dog influencers on social media. "All sorts of brands want to tap into dogs," Schutz said. "Dogs are a common denominator for everyone, and they're safe, because everyone likes a cute or funny dog. They're not going to get in some scandal or say something stupid on Twitter and have it reflect negatively on the brand." "There's an innate positive feeling that a viewer has when they see a cute dog doing something," said Loni Edwards, managing partner of The Dog Agency, a firm that matches brands like Dyson, Barneys New York and Accor Hotels to dog influencers.

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Will This Megaconcert With the Stones, Dylan and The Who Really Pass Up Sponsors?

September 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Desert Trip has already cleared $160 million from its sold-out six-day schedule, Oct. 7-9 and 14-16. Photo Illustration: Chefboyrg; Sources: Rederns, Getty Images, WireImage, FilmMagic The nasty jokes started shortly after the Rolling Stones, The Who , Paul McCartney, Neil Young , Roger Waters and Bob Dylan announced they'd be performing on the same bill for the first time at an epic two-weekend rock show dubbed Desert Trip. Who would sponsor this lineup of superstar septuagenarians? Forest Lawn Cemetery? Very funny, you snarky kids, who also labeled the upcoming shows "Oldchella," as a riff on the millennial-heavy Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival held annually at the same venue in Indio, Calif. As it turns out, there are likely to be few brand partners—funereal or otherwise—for Desert Trip, despite a long history of concert sponsorships, music licensing and high profile alliances between blue-chip brands and most of the celebrated artists involved. Festival organizers at AEG Live said there may be a "limited number" of sponsors, but declined to name them pending still-unsigned deals.

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Goodyear Is Celebrating 61 Years of ‘Blimp-Worthy’ College Football Moments

September 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Since 1955, Goodyear has been an integral part of college football, providing aerial footage for TV broadcasts with its famous Goodyear Blimp. The brand is putting the blimp front and center in its latest campaign from GSD&M, which gives the grittiest, most heroic moments in college football history a special designation—"blimp-worthy." "The blimp is one of the most iconic corporate symbols out there. Historically, it's a great asset, and it's been there for 61 years witnessing these moments," said Seth Klugherz, Goodyear's director of marketing. "We're trying to deliver a message that transcends football; that extends to people's everyday lives. When they get knocked down, they get back on their feet and do what it takes to accomplish their goals—whether that's carrying guys on your back to eke out that extra yard, or doing something in your personal life, all of that is blimp-worthy." TV ads will debut on Saturday with the kickoff of the college football season, and print ads will run in ESPN the Magazine and Sports Illustrated. Goodyear will also promote the campaign on social media using the hashtag #Blimpworthy. The campaign is part of Goodyear's many college football sponsorships. In 2014, the company started a partnership with ESPN to sponsor the Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic, which continues this year. Goodyear is also one of the official sponsors of the college football playoffs. "From the 1955 Rose Bowl on, we've been part of the fabric of college football," Klugherz said. "There are shared values between college football and Goodyear: hard work, determination and grit. We know this really resonates with consumers." CREDITS Agency: GSD&M Chief Creative Officer: Jay Russell Group Creative Directors: Alisa Wixom, Kris Wixom, Bill Bayne, Bill Marceau Art Director: Dale Austin Writer: Brandon Curl Executive Producer: Laura Busino Director of Integrated Production: Jack Epsteen SVP/Managing Director: Maureen Barry Account Leadership: Jeff Orth, Cat Snyder, Gigi Baffi, Katherine LaViscount Strategic Planning: John D'Acierno, Nicholas Howard Business Affairs: Jo Ella Mathis, Melody Parsons Project Management: Christina Contreras PRODUCTION COMPANY FOR TV & PRINT Graphics/FX: Electric Theatre Collective Edit: Cartel Editor: Chris Catanach Music Company: Butter

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Adventure and Danger Are Brewing in Droga5 London’s Work for Belstaff

August 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you're wearing Belstaff, get ready to set off on a great, potentially dangerous, next adventure. The clothing brand released new print creative from Droga5 London, the agency's first work for Belstaff after winning the business in November 2015. Droga5's work kicks off the "Here Be Dragons" campaign, aimed at capturing the adventurous spirit of Belstaff and the people who wear it. It's also designed to show how Belstaff's clothing can protect the wearer in any type of situation, even when navigating new terrain. "Our latest campaign is as true to the Belstaff brand today as it always has been and aims to inspire audiences to go beyond their boundaries in the knowledge they are accompanied and protected in iconic style by their trusted Belstaff," Gavin Haif, Belstaff CEO, said in a statement. Photographer Christian Weber shot the work, which features up-and-coming Serbian model Mijo Mihaljcic and a previously retired and famed model Mark Vanderloo, in a location that is meant to look far away and difficult to reach, tying into the "Here Be Dragons" theme.

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ABC Will Air the Oscars Through at Least 2028

August 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ABC remains the only one of the big four broadcast networks shut out of the NFL broadcast business, but it has a lock on its yearly marquee live TV event for the next 12 years. The network and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have extended their agreement for ABC to broadcast the Academy Awards—which is usually the most-watched entertainment program of the year—through 2028. This is an eight-year extension of the previous ABC/AMPAS deal, which was set to expire in 2020. "We're honored to continue our storied and successful partnership with ABC in broadcasting the most watched live entertainment event of the year," said Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs in a statement. "In 2028, we'll mark the Oscars 100th anniversary, and ABC is the perfect partner to help us celebrate the magic of movies with our fans. "After hosting the Academy Awards more than 50 times, ABC has become the home for Hollywood's most prestigious and glamorous night of television," said Ben Sherwood, co-chairman of Disney media networks and president of Disney-ABC Television Group, in a statement. "Broadcast television brings together the biggest audiences with high-quality live events, and ABC has the brightest, boldest lineup in the business." The deal was important for ABC, which doesn't enjoy the ratings bumps that CBS, NBC and Fox receive from broadcasting NFL games each fall or from airing what is always the year's most-watched TV program, the Super Bowl, every three years. Those games help keep those networks on top of the ratings each season, leaving ABC to instead tout its status as No. 1 network for entertainment programming (i.e.

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