Posts Tagged ‘apple’

Apple Scores a “C” on David Einhorn’s Capital Allocation Exam

November 22, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

David Einhorn’s iPrefs proposal was among the factors that influenced Apple’s decision to launch one of the biggest share buybacks in history. So what’s the hedge fund manager’s feeling on the company’s capital allocation plan these days? Now that Apple has abandoned the Depression-era grandmother mentality with which it managed its cash hoard, Einhorn’s view of the company has tempered a bit. But not that much. “I think that that moves Apple’s capital management from a D- to a C or something like that,” Einhorn told CNBC Thursday . “Obviously more could be done that would probably unlock additional value, but it’s not so bad at this point that I really want to complain about it.” And to be clear, Einhorn does understand the rationale for Apple’s conservative cash management, which he attributes to co-founder Steve Jobs. “You had a culture under Steve Jobs where there was a concern to keep a cushion of cash if the markets are not there in some period,” Einhorn said. “I think it makes sense for Apple to maintain a very good, strong cushion, so they can continue to innovate even if the market hits a bad cycle.” Given what has happened to BlackBerry in the past few years, that does seem wise. Einhorn noted this himself, though he did also observe that the virtuous purchasing cycle Apple has created around the iPhone should temper such fears. “People look at Apple and ask, ‘Is it the next Motorola or BlackBerry?’” Einhorn said. “People paid fancy multiples for those stocks and got crushed and they don’t want to go through that again. But I think Apple’s a little bit different from those companies, because the ecosystem component [drives] recurring sale[s]

Read More

Jury: Samsung Owes Apple Another $290 Million

November 21, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

A federal jury on Thursday ruled that Samsung owes Apple a further $290 million for infringing on the iPhone maker’s patented technology, according to multiple reports from inside the courtroom. The award concludes a partial retrial of last year’s landmark case between the electronics giants. A jury in that case ruled in Apple’s favor and awarded $1 billion in damages. However, Judge Lucy Koh ruled that more than $400 million of that award was improperly calculated, necessitating the current retrial . Apple had argued it was due a further $379 million, while Samsung maintained it should only owe $52 million for the portion of damages being reconsidered. Barring a successful appeal, Samsung also owes roughly $640 million in damages from the original verdict as well. The six woman, two man jury deliberated for part of three days before returning its verdict. During that time, the jury requested additional paper and pens, better lunch as well as a copy of the sketches of them done by a courtroom artist. This decision, while widely watched, does little to settle the litigation between the two companies, which spans multiple courtrooms and continents. Another case is set for trial next year before Judge Koh involving a newer generation of Samsung’s products, meanwhile both sides are appealing various parts of this current case.

Read More

10 Brands That Changed the World [Video]

November 20, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Read More

E-Reader vs. iPad

November 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Q: My wife started reading e-books downloaded from the library on her iPad 2. Indoors the print is very readable, but it loses some of the sharpness in bright light. Some of her friends suggested the Kindle Paperwhite as a better reader in all types of light. What is your opinion? A: All current color tablets use a screen technology that washes out in sunlight and can become almost unreadable in direct, bright sunlight. The Kindle monochrome e-readers, including the Paperwhite, use a different technology that does well in all kinds of light. However, I have never noticed any degradation of screen readability on iPads or other quality color tablets in bright indoor light. Q: Is it fair to say that the iPad Air, like its predecessors, is designed more for content consumption than content creation, and that someone who really needs a computer but also wants a tablet (and can’t afford both) would do better with something like the new Surface? A: The iPad can be a fine productivity and creativity tool, with or without an accessory keyboard, depending on the app you are using. Business email and calendars, or the editing of office documents, work fine on the iPad, as do many drawing applications.

Read More

Apple Makes Case for Why it Deserves $379 Million More From Samsung

November 19, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Apple is making its case Tuesday for why it believes it deserves most of the $400 million in damages that is at issue in a partial retrial of last year’s patent infringement case with Samsung. The original jury’s finding of infringement on Samsung’s part, as well as a good chunk of the $1 billion verdict remains intact. However, Judge Lucy Koh ruled that jury erred in how it calculated part of the damages calculation, necessitating the current retrial . Apple argues it is due $379 million for the products at issue, while Samsung has maintained it should only have to pay $52 million. Both sides are appealing various parts of the original issue as well, with Apple seeking injunctions on certain Samsung products and Samsung looking to have the original verdict thrown out due to what it says are multiple procedural errors in the case. While witnesses may forget details and lawyers can make fancy arguments for what could have been, Apple lawyer Bill Lee argued that the paperwork in the case supports the case that Apple’s patents are significant and were important to the company’s effort to catch up to the iPhone and iPad, which Lee characterized as revolutionary and gorgeous, citing press reports. “Documents don’t lie,” Apple lawyer Bill Lee said, beginning its closing argument in the case

Read More

iPad Mini’s Color Range Still a Shade Shy of the Best

November 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Anandtech With the next-generation iPad mini with Retina display, Apple managed to create a device identical to its sibling, the iPad Air, in most ways, save size. The two tablets run the same A7 chip and use the same cameras — front and back. They feature the same design, and they are nearly equivalent in performance and battery life. But they do differ in one important area: Color accuracy. Two new analyses of the Retina iPad mini display reveal that the device has the same color gamut as the now year-old standard iPad mini. That means its color range is narrower than that of not just the iPad Air, but rival tablets like the Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire HDX 8.9. According to Anandtech’s tests of the Retina mini , the device’s Delta-E — a measurement that represents the “distance” between the color a display is told to reproduce and the color it actually shows — is much higher than that of the iPad Air. The Retina mini scored an average Delta-E of 6.5, compared to 2.4 for the iPad Air (and 3.3 for Google’s Nexus 7). This isn’t a huge deficit; the Retina mini’s display still looks great, but as Anandtech observes, it lacks the same visual punch you get from the iPad Air (compare the reds in the Retina mini and iPad Air above). Anandtech DisplayMate reached a similar conclusion in its analysis of mini tablet displays . The firm ranked the Retina mini last in a display shootout with the Nexus 7 and Amazon’s Kindle Fire HDX 7, and criticized Apple for leaving it with the same small color gamut as the original iPad mini and even older iPad 2. “That is inexcusable for a current generation premium tablet,” DisplayMate President Ray Soneira said. “The big differences in color gamut between the Kindle Fire HDX 7 and Nexus 7 and the much smaller 63 percent gamut in the iPad mini Retina display were quite obvious and easy to see in the side-by-side viewing tests.

Read More

Men in Black Suits II: Apple-Samsung Retrial Suffers From Sequel’s Curse

November 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

The original Apple-Samsung trial had it all — a gripping plot, stellar cast and lots of intrigue. Unfortunately, like all too many sequels, the current retrial feels like just a rehash of something that was admittedly a pretty good show the first time. Where the initial trial brought revelations including new sales figures , early iPhone prototypes and juicy insights into how Apple designs its products , no such new ground is being traversed this time around. And, while the last trial was about dueling perspectives on innovation, this one is just about money. The first jury already decided which Samsung products infringed on which Apple products. But the judge concluded that the original jury erred in how it calculated a portion of the more than $1 billion in damages it awarded. Apple says Samsung owes it an additional $379 million in damages for the products at issue, while Samsung says $52 million is a proper figure. From a cinematic point of view, the best thing one can say about this installment is that it is short. Each side is allowed only eight hours of witnesses, compared to the 25 hours both parties had during the original trial. Testimony is due to wrap up today, with closing arguments expected Tuesday. Perhaps the biggest star in the retrial, Apple marketing head Phil Schiller, took the stand late last week, beginning his testimony Thursday and wrapping up on Friday morning. But most of what he said dealt with the kinds of details surrounding the iPhone launch that he shared the last time he was on the stand . On the bench is the always entertaining Lucy Koh, the same federal judge who presided over the first case. Koh, a rising star, is known for her sharp wit and strict adherence to the clock. She famously suggested during the first trial that one of Apple’s lawyers was smoking crack if he thought he had time to call as many witnesses as he proposed. The supporting cast is also familiar, including many of the same lawyers, expert witnesses, etc. Like any big Hollywood production, though, there were at least enough good moments to make for a decent trailer. Some of the best drama came before the trial itself, during jury selection. Judge Koh dismissed 11 prospective jurors found chatting about the case

Read More

Title Inflation Police

November 17, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

You do not deserve the title of genius! You can’t just throw that term around. Saturday Night Live’s Jay Pharaoh, in character as Kanye West , to Lady Gaga playing Karen, the Apple Store Genius Bar tech support employee

Read More

Ballmer on Ballmer: His Exit From Microsoft

November 15, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Steve Ballmer paced his corner office on a foggy January morning here, listening through loudspeakers to his directors’ voices on a call that would set in motion the end of his 13-year reign as Microsoft Corp.’s chief executive. Microsoft lagged behind Apple Inc. and Google Inc. in important consumer markets, despite its formidable software revenue. Mr. Ballmer tried to spell out his plan to remake Microsoft, but a director cut him off, telling him he was moving too slowly. “Hey, dude, let’s get on with it,” lead director John Thompson says he told him. “We’re in suspended animation.” Mr. Ballmer says he replied that he could move faster. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

Read More

Pfizer’s Prescription for BlackBerry-Using Employees: iPhone and Android

November 15, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Interim CEO John Chen says BlackBerry isn’t dwelling on the past, but looking to the future . Unfortunately for the languishing smartphone maker, some of its big clients are doing the same. And the future they see is one in which BlackBerry doesn’t figure quite so prominently. Some big clients like the U.S. Defense Department are developing mobile device contingency plans to implement should BlackBerry finally, irrevocably, collapse. Others, like Pfizer, are responding to the uncertainty around the company’s business by beginning to phase out its devices entirely. In a recent memo to employees , Pfizer — one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies — told the BlackBerry users among them to switch to an iPhone or Android handset when their wireless contract next permits an upgrade

Read More