Posts Tagged ‘amazon’

5 Ways Television Changed Dramatically in 2014

December 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Television advertising has been a pretty conservative marketplace: You buy Nielsen ratings, you make 30-second advertisements and sometimes you buy product placement. But the sudden ascent of non-Nielsen-rated content has created a gaping void in the measurement world. And popular genres like horror, with shows such as The Walking Dead, Game of Thrones and American Horror Story, aren't super friendly to adjacencies and product placement. Who wants to see consecutive bites taken out of a leg and a cheeseburger? (Game of Thrones, of course, isn't even ad-supported). So here are a few ways the industry is changing, and what it means for 2015. 1. Ratings went crazy. What happened? The measurement world's lack of visibility into the mobile and tablet spaces generated shrugs until fairly recently. It's become spectacularly—maybe horribly—easy to spy on computer users' surfing habits (no, "incognito mode" does not hide you from anybody except your mom). But your cell phone and your iPad are still difficult to track, mostly because in-browser viewing isn't the norm. Video apps like Hulu are much harder to track with cookies because you aren't in your browser. And that's where a huge, valuable chunk of viewing takes place. So Nielsen (which suffered a serious black eye at the beginning of the season by spilling coffee on the keyboard or something on a bunch of its Live+SD figures, resulting in some major corrections) is racing to make its gross ratings point tool, the one advertisers pay for in non-theoretical money, the standard across not just linear cable and broadcast, but new media, as well. It's not there yet, partly because there's still significant dispute over whether or not an ad delivered on a smartphone is worth the same amount of money as an ad delivered on a 50-inch plasma screen

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The 10 Best New TV Shows of the Year

December 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

At the end of every great TV series—The Sopranos, Breaking Bad, The Wire, 30 Rock—somebody usually jumps to declare the Golden Age of Television at an end, and somehow that prediction never manages to be right. There's a ton of great TV around these days, from off-kilter comedies like Brooklyn Nine-Nine to unexpected dramas like Masters of Sex. More so than ever in the history of TV, the onus is on creators to be surprising, to be impressive and, most of all, to hold our attention. A lot of this is a direct result of the stuff that (very reasonably) terrifies the people who run TV: the advent of streaming video on demand, the wars of attrition with cable providers, the mass exodus of young people to YouTube and gaming. All that stuff means that it's imperative for television content to be compelling enough to drag a potential viewer back from the new Uncharted game, or to motivate the writing of an angry letter when cable drops his or her favorite network. And that means that this was a hard list to write, because so much new TV in 2014 was so good.

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Netflix Streaming Eats Up 35% of Downstream Internet Bandwidth: Study

November 20, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Netflix’s video-streaming service continues to be the most bandwidth-hungry application on the Internet, now accounting for a whopping 34.9% of all downstream traffic during peak periods on North American broadband networks, according to a new study. The No. 1 subscription-video service outstripped all other services in terms of bandwidth consumption, as measured over a one-month period... Read more

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Box Office Mojo Returns After One-Day Absence

October 12, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Without explanation, the Box Office Mojo site has returned following an absence of slightly more than a day. The site vanished on Friday afternoon with the site redirecting users to parent Amazon.com’s IMDb. It returned early Saturday evening but without any explanation on IMDB, Box Office Mojo or on Box Office Mojo’s official Twitter and... Read more

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Amazon Studios Wants Big Comedies, Ready to Pay $4 Million for Pilots: Sources

October 8, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Amazon Studios, its appetite whetted for half-hour comedies, is now looking to fund a big-budget, high-profile laffer to anchor its next wave of original series — and rival Netflix for attention-grabbing properties. The studio has indicated pilot budgets for its next comedies will be between $2 million and $4 million, but that it would be willing... Read more

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Alibaba’s IPO May Be Biggest In History

September 15, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Analysts are divided over Chinese e-commerce giant, but with shares priced at $60-66 each, it measures up against Internet rivals.

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Amazon’s ‘Transparent’ Season 1 to Debut Late September, ‘Bosch’ Premiering Early 2015

July 12, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Amazon’s new original drama “Transparent” will debut on Amazon Prime in late September, creator Jill Soloway announced Saturday at the Television Critics Assn. summer press tour. All ten episodes of the series will premiere at once through Amazon Prime Instant Video, in the so-called “binge” model popularized by Netflix. Decisions have not yet been made on... Read more

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‘La Tirisia’: Tracing the Social Causes of Mexico’s Perpetual Sadness

July 6, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

It is no coincidence that when Brazil’s president Dirma Rousseff announced this week a 2014 $540 million federal financing package for film and TV in Brazil, one of the first measures she specified was coin for cultural projects in six out-of-way-states in Brazil’s, such as Acre in the Amazon, where indigenous villages will be put... Read more

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Amazon Acquires Exclusive Streaming Rights to Drafthouse Films via Cinedigm Pact

June 26, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Amazon.com struck a content-licensing pact with Cinedigm making Prime Instant Video the exclusive subscription VOD service for several indie movies from Drafthouse Films, the film distribution arm of Alamo Drafthouse Cinema. Titles available today to Amazon’s Prime members in the U.S. include black comedy “Cheap Thrills,” Ben Wheatley’s psychedelic sorcery film “A Field in England,”... Read more

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Baltimore-based Camden Arts and Motion Launching as Distributor for Indie Films

June 24, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

A quartet of Baltimore filmmakers have launched Camden Arts and Motion as a distributor of independent movies. The company is attempting to make itself more attractive to filmmakers by offering gross percentages of box office receipts — and making them partners in the process. “This means that from now on any filmmaker that works with... Read more

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