Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Wait for Spring and Network with Talk NYC at The Ainsworth

Wait for Spring and Network with Talk NYC at The Ainsworth

Network with media and advertising professionals in New York on February 25th
February 15, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Who's tired of winter? The team at Talk NYC has similar feelings, and as we prepare for ENGAGE: The Digital Storytelling Conference in April, we are getting a case of cabin fever. If you are in the New York area, stop hibernating and come mingle with Talk NYC at The Ainsworth on February 25, 2014. You'll learn more about ENGAGE 2014 and meet other thought leaders and up-and-comers in the media and digital space! Plus, the first hour of this much-needed happy hour is open bar! ENGAGE: The Digital Storytelling Conference is coming up this April, and with speakers from Huge, 60 Minutes, Refinery29 and

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Mobile Apps Still Feel Risky, But Don’t Let That Stop You

Mobile Apps Still Feel Risky, But Don’t Let That Stop You

mobile-phones
February 10, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Talk NYC is continuing its new contributor series with Vaino Leskinen, Head of Mobile, TBWA's Digital Arts Network LA — 2013 was the year of mobile and 2014 will be one as well. Flurry, a mobile analytics vendor, claims that Americans spend an average of 2 hours and 38 minutes per day on smartphones and tablets. Moreover, Business Insider says mobile accounts for 20% of ecommerce traffic and 11% of ecommerce sales. Mobile has arrived and a huge chunk of the action is in applications.

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Take the Subway in New York? Then you Know Lucas

Take the Subway in New York? Then you Know Lucas

Screen shot 2014-02-08 at 9.07.49 AM
February 9, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Few subway ads have created the uproar that Venmo, a new money exchange app, has in the past few months since rolling out their all-encompassing "Lucas uses Venmo" campaign. If you take the subway, you know what we mean. Besides the wonderfully horrible Dr. Zizmor ads that all New Yorkers have come to love and look for, we can't remember a campaign that has been as polarizing as this one from Venmo.

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Want to Sell Something? Know Thy Audience...

Want to Sell Something? Know Thy Audience…

A group of young adults drinking alcohol from a jug, ca. 1900
February 8, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

In a seemingly innocuous tale about how Irish whisky has had the comeback of spirits comebacks, Esquire lets its readers in on a very important tip for anyone trying to market a brand, product or event: if you want the world to buy what you're selling, you have to know how to talk to your audience.

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Storytelling Needs to Evolve With the Times

Storytelling Needs to Evolve With the Times

Screen shot 2014-02-08 at 8.07.27 AM
February 8, 2014  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Do you create content on a daily basis? Then you need to watch this talk from 99u and Gary Vaynerchuk, because there are some hard truths being shared for anyone using social media as a marketing tool.

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Adult Swim Adds a Primetime Hour

February 4, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Cartoon Network is losing the 8 p.m. hour to Adult Swim, the edgy sister network that shares its space on the dial. Adult Swim has been one of Turner's most significant success stories in recent years, with consistently high ratings among its hard-to-reach target demo, while Cartoon has struggled against competitors Nickelodeon and Disney. For 2013, Adult Swim finished the year in first place among adults 18-34 in total day and came in only second to TBS in primetime, despite not actually airing during the 8 p.m. hour. That's set to change starting March 31, when Adult Swim takes over the 8 o'clock hour and Cartoon Network starts making more inroads online. Additionally, Boomerang, the company's smaller, higher-tier classic-cartoon network (basically, where you go if you want to see Bugs Bunny) will become ad-supported as of this upfront season and be marketed internationally as well.

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NAMG Confirms It Has Bought Scout from Fox Networks Group in Dude-Focused Content Roll-Up Bid

November 21, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

The North American Membership Group confirmed a previous report by Business Insider that it had bought sports site Scout.com from the Fox Networks Group. The price of the deal was not disclosed, but sources said it was substantially lower than the $60 million that the News Corp. paid for it in 2005. The combined entity — described as a “new digital media network focused primarily on male enthusiasts” — will led by Jim Heckman and be called Scout Media. The merged companies are owned by New York-based private equity fund Pilot Group, which is run by well-known media and Internet exec Bob Pittman. The new Scout will aim to take advantage of its numerous content offerings, including about football, basketball, baseball and outdoor enthusiast sports such as hunting and fishing, to attract both and audience and advertisers via cable television shows and on the Web, with a heavy emphasis on video. The business, which NAMG said has over $100 million in combined revenue already, will center on both subscription and advertising revenue, as well as commerce. Presumably, it will get further funding to find other related properties to add to its portfolio. Heckman’s recent job was as head of global media strategy at Yahoo, where he arrived after the Silicon Valley Internet giant bought his ad network company, 5to1.com. Heckman also founded Rivals.com, which was also sold to Yahoo. Pilot Group has a range of investments in sites like Thrillist, Next New Networks, Rapleaf and TrialPay.  Heckman said in an interview that he was aiming to create a premium content company aimed at men. “We’ve learned the male demographic is not easy to reach in a way brands require. It’s not hard to find scale for men, but often the content is sketchy,” he said. “Our new network checks all the boxes: Scale, professionally produced, clean, safe and in categories brands love like sports and outdoors.”

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And Then There Was One, as Disney Picks Single Digital Leader

November 12, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Earlier today, Disney said — what is likely not much of a shock to anyone — that it was handing over the reins of its interactive division to one of its two co-presidents, Jimmy Pitaro. That means John Pleasants, who was the other co-president and was located in Silicon Valley, is leaving the kingdom, merging the games and media units under one leader in Los Angeles. Pleasants, as happens in these kinds of things, will be a strategic consultant to Disney Interactive. The reorganization of the unit comes three years after the Pitaro, a former Yahoo media exec, and Pleasants, who came to Disney via its acquisition of Playdom, were paired . Disney Interactive recently reported its second quarterly profit of $16 million on sales of $396 million, in what has been an uphill effort over the past decade for the the entertainment giant. Under the regime of former CEO Michael Eisner — many digital moons ago and which I covered since I am so dang old — Disney bought search engine Infoseek and tried to create a portal called Go.com. That failed, and was one of many efforts to define the media company’s Web goals. More recently, in 2008, Disney gathered most of its Internet properties under Steve Wadsworth. Then came the pairing of Pitaro and Pleasants. And now, just Pitaro. Disney said it “will move forward with a singular strategy for driving revenue and advertising across key platforms and franchises,” such as Disney Infinity — a big Pleasants project — and Club Penguin.

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Today’s Giant Media Event, Brought to You – and Owned – by Google

November 3, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Remember when Google was a technology company that didn’t want to be in the media business? Actually, that was always a stretch, since Google has been selling ads since 2000, and soon after that became one of the world’s most powerful media companies, no matter how it liked to describe itself. Now Google has stopped pretending. And it is doing a lot more than selling ads around other people’s content – it’s investing in content itself. See, for example: Zagat , Frommer’s , Machinima , Vevo , dozens of YouTube channels , and 300, Lyor Cohen’s new record label . And if you don’t want to click on any of those links, head to YouTube tonight at 6pm eastern, where the world’s largest video site is putting on its own awards show , designed to occupy some of the same pop cultural turf now claimed by spectacles like the Grammy’s and the VMAs. As the Verge reminds us, YouTube has tried to do something a little like this before.  But YouTube Live was mostly a celebration of things that only existed because of YouTube, like Tay Zonday . And it ended up being a pretty modest celebration . Tonight’s YouTube Music Awards are supposed to be big big big, featuring people lots of people have heard of, like Lady Gaga and Eminem. Director Spike Jonze, who made it big in music videos back when music videos were still something you watched on MTV, is coordinating the whole thing. And YouTube promises that the whole thing will run a tight 90 minutes, which is a big deal for a company that plays it by ear quite a bit. What’s most striking about today’s event is that the concept isn’t really that striking at all: Music videos and YouTube are now synonymous , and have been for a long time.

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Cable Upfront Haul Passes the $10 Billion Mark

October 21, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While the national cable TV networks continue to siphon off upfront dollars from the broadcasters, the days of torrid double-digit volume increases appear to be a thing of the past. According to calculations made by the Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau , ad-supported cable networks generated a record $10.2 billion in 2013-14 upfront commitments, marking a 4 percent uptick versus the year-ago period. And while that’s hardly what anyone would characterize as chump change, it is the smallest year-to-year increase in five years. (The recession-wracked 2009-10 cable bazaar was down 11 percent from a then-record $7.6 billion; that same year, the Big Four broadcasters saw upfront dollars plummet 22 percent to $6.88 billion.) Last year’s cable haul was up 5 percent to $9.8 billion, a “normalized” result that paled in comparison to the 16 percent increase in the 2011-12 upfront and a plus-19 percent result in 2010-11. Cable upfront sales have been on the rise for the last four years, as commitments have increased 52 percent since the last downturn. Ad-supported cable nets have out-earned the English-language broadcasters three years running; this summer, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and the CW stitched together an estimated $9.15 billion in upfront sales. The competitive balance between the two sectors has been shaken up by the sheer amount of quality programming now available on cable as well as the inherent efficiencies of the business. On a CPM basis, prime-time inventory on a top 20 cable net costs about one-third as much as that on the broadcast nets. (Obviously, outliers like TV’s top-rated scripted series, The Walking Dead , and ESPN’s Monday Night Football, don’t conform to the tertiary trend.) CAB president and CEO Sean Cunningham attributes cable’s strong showing to a combination of factors, although the synthesis of TV and on-demand/streaming sales seems to have helped move the needle this year. Over the course of the summer bazaar, cable nets locked in approximately a half-billion dollars in online video revenue. “Throughout our meetings with agencies and advertisers we handed off a ton of proof-points about our brands, our record-breaking original programs, our role as dominant content over five screens (including social TV), and the incredibly high amount of consumer hours spent monthly with ad-supported cable brands—some 94 hours-per-month on TV and the Internet combined,” Cunningham said.

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