Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Scripps Is Planning a 6-Network Halloween Crossover Special

March 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Marvel and DC aren't the only media companies engineering major crossover events to showcase their biggest properties. Scripps Networks Interactive—home to HGTV, Food Network, Travel Channel, DIY Network, Cooking Channel and Great American Country—is planning a Halloween special featuring talent from many of its channels to air on all six networks. The company discussed cross-network and cross-platform opportunities for advertisers during a media briefing before today's upfront presentation, which will be held at New York's Alice Tully Hall. It's the third stop on Scripps' seven-city upfront tour, which kicked off March 15 in Atlanta and also includes stops in Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, Boston and L.A. Jon Steinlauf, president of national ad sales and marketing, touted Scripps' robust portfolio and said its top three channels are growing in ratings, revenue and share. "We're delivering our advertisers' schedules with a growing stable of hit shows that families can watch together," Steinlauf said. And almost all of those shows are being watched live: 97 percent of Scripps' C3 audience watches either live or later that same day, making Scripps the No. 1 network group in the category. Scripps' ratings growth is led by HGTV, which had its highest rated year in 2015 and as of February is the No.

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Infographic: A TV Show’s Appeal Can Determine Ad Recall, Twitter Study Says

March 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Advertising agencies can now blame TV shows when a new spot doesn't quite get the attention they think it deserves—at least sort of. According to a new study by Twitter, Starcom and social TV analytics company Canvs, programming where an audience had high emotions often led them to have higher ad recall. In fact, a survey of 3,500 Twitter users and non-users found that viewers were 48 percent more likely to recall an ad they saw the day before. "Not all TV audiences are created equal: we've long believed that viewers respond differently to commercials depending on how they feel about what they're watching," Heather O'Shea, Twitter's global agency research and data strategy lead, wrote in a blog post. "And when it comes to getting a pulse on people's emotional reactions during live TV, now we know that Twitter can drive even stronger results for brands." Based on the results, O'Shea offered three tips for marketers hoping to harness the double-screen world: 1.

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Tastemade Serves Up $40 Million Funding Round

December 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Tastemade has had quite the year. The company, known for its quirky short-form videos in the food, travel and lifestyle space, hit the 100 million monthly active viewer mark, with more than 1 billion monthly views. On Facebook alone, Tastemade grew its audience from around 100,000 fans to more than 5.7 million. This year, the company launched on Apple TV – the only food and travel channel on the platform – linked up with Facebook's Anthology and Suggested Videos, partnered with Spotify on the streaming music company's video service, and landed one of the 15 prized spots on Snapchat's Discover platform . As Tastemade, which was founded in 2012, heads into its fourth year, it will do so with deeper pockets. The video publisher announced this morning it has closed a $40 million Series D funding round led by Goldman Sachs, with participation from existing investors Redpoint Ventures, Raine Ventures, Comcast Ventures, Liberty Media, Scripps Networks Interactive, and Tohokushinsha Film Corporation. With the extra cash in hand, Larry Fitzgibbon, one of Tastemade's co-founders, wants to continue Tastemade's momentum, especially when it comes to working with brands. "All of that work has culminated into us reaching the exact consumer we thought we would at a scale we thought we would as well," said Fitzgibbon. "We are truly becoming the brands for our categories for that audience." Fitzgibbon noted that they're seeing an increased appetite from advertisers who want to appeal to that young, millennial, mobile-first audience

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How Bravo is Helping Fans Dress Like the Stars of Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce

December 1, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Call it the girlfriends' guide to style. With a second-screen experience called The Loobook, Bravo is helping fans of its sophmore series Girlfriends' Guide to Divorce dress just like the stars of the show. The Lookbook, launching today ahead of tonight's season 2 premiere, is a digital and social hub offering the same outfits worn by star Lisa Edelstein and the show's cast. Ulta Beauty has signed on as the exclusive beauty partner, in what is the retailer's first multiplatform brand campaign. Ulta's partnership includes a branded video web series hosted by style and beauty YouTuber Sona Gasparian. Style vignettes airing during each episode will point viewers back to The Lookbook, which will also feature behind-the-scenes videos, style guide profiles for cast members, curated product guides and click-to-buy partner sites. "Bravo's audience has an insatiable appetite for all things fashion and beauty, especially when it relates to our series talent," said Laura Molen, evp, lifestyle advertising sales, NBCUniversal. "Together with Ulta Beauty, we're excited to launch the ultimate shopping experience for our fans to more deeply connect with our programming, characters and our advertising partners." Girlfriends' Guide was Bravo's second most-watched freshman series to launch last year. Its 829,000 adults 25-54 and 749,000 adults 18-49 averages are an increase of 14 percent and 8 percent, respectively, compared to the average freshman scripted series on cable.

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South Park Hysterically Satirized Ad Blocking and Sponsored Content

November 19, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

South Park's 19th season has been unusually strong, thanks to a season-long storyline involving topics like political correctness and gentrification. "Sponsored Content," last night's episode of the Comedy Central hit, was one of its best yet in 2015. Show creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone hilariously took on several of the issues advertisers have been grappling with, including ad blocking and sponsored content. In the episode, the elementary school's new principal, PC Principal, informs the student editor of the school newspaper, Jimmy, that he can no longer distribute the paper in school until the content is pre-approved. Jimmy refuses and instead delivers it door to door, to the delight of parents who are finally able to enjoy news stories that aren't obstructed by ads. "There's no ads, no sponsored content, no links to click on," says one overjoyed parent, Stephen. He then goes off on this rant about the insanity of reading content online: "Do you know how long it's been since I was just able to sit back and read the news? I got so used to getting news off the internet, but I feel like I'm always trying to chase the news somehow. It's like I'm in a black void trying to reach the news story, but then the next thing I know, I'm reading an ad for Geico.

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Here’s How Brands Can Make a Splash on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert

August 31, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS is just a week away from the launch of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, which it hopes will shake up the late-night landscape in more ways than one. Colbert's Sept. 8 debut includes George Clooney and Jeb Bush, but two of his other premiere-week guests are drawing the most attention from advertisers and marketers: SpaceX and Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk on Sept. 9 and Uber CEO Travis Kalanick on Sept. 10. "It really is innovative.

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Millennials Favor Facebook Over TV for Political News

June 1, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In Republican years and Democratic years, local television stations have always emerged as winners. The 2014 midterm election delivered an estimated $2.4 billion to local stations, as candidates and political action committees bought time for federal, state and local races. As stations gear up for a presidential election cycle—and the cash it will bring—a new report released Monday by the Pew Research Center suggests a sea change ahead, that could send much of that ad spending to social media. "When it comes to where younger Americans get news about politics and government, social media look to be the local TV of the millennial generation," said Amy Mitchell, director of journalism research at Pew. The report, Millennials and Political News , was based on an online survey of nearly 3,000 people. Millennials reported little interest in following their parents' habit of turning to local television for political coverage—and the advertising that traditionally fills commercial breaks in election years. Sixty percent of baby boomers trust local TV for political news, but the same percentage of millennials opt for Facebook. That shift presents challenges for campaigns and elected officials, as well as for advertisers and station groups. "We are only beginning to understand the complex interactions of personal choice, friend networks and algorithms in the social media space," said Mitchell. "As the research continues, these data suggest there are fundamental differences in the ways younger and older generations stay informed about political news."

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NBCU Sales Chief Shares Her Strategy for Upfront Negotiations

June 1, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For the next several weeks, Linda Yaccarino will be one of the hardest working people in television. As chairman, advertising sales and client partnerships for NBCUniversal, she's overseeing upfront negotiations for a robust TV portfolio that includes two broadcast networks, 17 cable channels and more than 50 digital properties. "It's a world of difference from three years ago when we first had this crazy notion of bringing the company together as one portfolio," said Yaccarino, who joined the network in 2011 as president, cable entertainment and digital advertising sales (she previously oversaw sales for Turner Entertainment as evp and COO), adding NBC and Telemundo a year later. Before ramping up her upfront negotiations, Yaccarino talked about plans for next season, her company's big swings and of course, the d-word. Data was the buzzword of the upfronts, but is that continuing during sales meetings? All day long! It's the lead question I get asked from all our customers: "What are you up to, what are you doing, what's next?" Data and technology will change the advertising business in the next five years more than we've seen in the last 30 years. NBCUniversal has such scale, but is owned by a company like Comcast that has such technology and a direct relationship with consumers. When we bring all these things together, that will benefit our advertising clients, and that's what truly consumes most of my days. You rolled out ATP, your audience targeting platform, in January. How will you use it during the upfront? This is the latest in our suite of data products. We knew we wanted to refine the media plans that we have and reduce waste. It reduces waste for us because we get better at managing our inventory, and it reduces waste or enhances what the advertiser is getting based on their deliverables, whatever their RFP says, or their brand briefs. As I like to explain it, it's giving you last year's media plan, but in the nonfat version. C7 was all the rage during last year's upfronts. Are people still talking about that this year, or have priorities shifted? I don't think priorities have shifted, but clients have many different priorities. So while C7 is important to some people, and NBCUniversal is open for business for C7, our data conversations have taken us in a whole new direction. To supplement the current currency that exists, we talk about a bunch of different other deliverables based on the merged data sets.

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How Mad Men, by Looking Back, Changed the Future of Advertising

May 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

"On Stage 9, the wardrobes of the male cast members include white shirts, cuff links, tie clips and hats," Stuart Elliott wrote in his New York Times advertising column in 2006, about a then-unknown cast shooting a pilot. "The female cast members wear long skirts, slips, formidable-looking brassieres and nylon stockings." Elliott would go on to write many columns about the AMC network's Mad Men—which premiered on July 19, 2007 and which, with much fanfare, draws to a close with the series finale on May 17—and he found silver-haired ad executives to be polarized. "Half of the people I talk to from that era are very hard-core fans of the show and say that it is exactly what it was like then," Elliott, who retired from the Times in 2014 after 23 years, tells Adweek. "And half say the show was completely phony and drummed up for dramatic purposes." Whether the series got the era right or not, what cannot be denied is that it has had an immeasurable impact on this one. Here, some of the more significant ways Mad Men changed our world. It made advertising sexy In 2007, procurement departments increasingly were applying the same cost-cutting measures to ad agencies as they did to their copy paper and coffee vendors. Ad executives, priding themselves as trusted advisors, felt slighted—and it didn't help that viewers were gleefully TiVo-ing past their commercials. "The ad business," Elliott recalls, "was kind of in a funk." Enter Jon Hamm as Don Draper. Lantern jawed, crisply dressed and pomaded, he made this pronouncement in the first episode: "Advertising is based on one thing: happiness. And you know what happiness is? Happiness is the smell of a new car. It's freedom from fear. It's a billboard on the side of the road that screams reassurance that whatever you are doing is OK." Music to the ad industry's ears. Bob Jeffrey, who served as worldwide CEO of JWT when the show premiered, notes that it helped provide the industry with a pipeline of aspiring talent

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Why Showtime’s Happyish Defiled the Keebler Elves

April 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For close to five decades, the Keebler Elves have been a genial, wholesome presence in Keebler advertising as they sang the praises of the brand's cookies and crackers. But Sunday's premiere of the new Showtime comedy Happyish quickly changed the Elves' slogan from "Uncommonly Good" to "uncommonly disturbing." In a hallucination by the show's disillusioned ad exec Thom Payne (Steve Coogan), the animated Ernie Keebler, stunned to be fired as Keebler's pitchman after 46 years, drops f-bombs and starts shooting his fellow elves, including Fast Eddie, before turning the gun on himself. Then a stunned Ma Keebler proceeds to disrobe and have sex with Payne.The now-defiled Keebler Elves are just the first of several beloved advertising icons that Happyish skewers during its 10-episode debut season. Created by author Shalom Auslander, who begrudgingly worked in advertising for more than two decades to supplement his writing career, the show routinely takes aim at the business that Auslander loves to hate. "I ended up having this fantastic deal that I got fired from," Auslander said. "I was working for McCann Erickson, living in Woodstock [, N.Y.] and coming in once a month, and sending in ideas and not really caring what happened to them.

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