Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Millennials Favor Facebook Over TV for Political News

June 1, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In Republican years and Democratic years, local television stations have always emerged as winners. The 2014 midterm election delivered an estimated $2.4 billion to local stations, as candidates and political action committees bought time for federal, state and local races. As stations gear up for a presidential election cycle—and the cash it will bring—a new report released Monday by the Pew Research Center suggests a sea change ahead, that could send much of that ad spending to social media. "When it comes to where younger Americans get news about politics and government, social media look to be the local TV of the millennial generation," said Amy Mitchell, director of journalism research at Pew. The report, Millennials and Political News , was based on an online survey of nearly 3,000 people. Millennials reported little interest in following their parents' habit of turning to local television for political coverage—and the advertising that traditionally fills commercial breaks in election years. Sixty percent of baby boomers trust local TV for political news, but the same percentage of millennials opt for Facebook. That shift presents challenges for campaigns and elected officials, as well as for advertisers and station groups. "We are only beginning to understand the complex interactions of personal choice, friend networks and algorithms in the social media space," said Mitchell. "As the research continues, these data suggest there are fundamental differences in the ways younger and older generations stay informed about political news."

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NBCU Sales Chief Shares Her Strategy for Upfront Negotiations

June 1, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For the next several weeks, Linda Yaccarino will be one of the hardest working people in television. As chairman, advertising sales and client partnerships for NBCUniversal, she's overseeing upfront negotiations for a robust TV portfolio that includes two broadcast networks, 17 cable channels and more than 50 digital properties. "It's a world of difference from three years ago when we first had this crazy notion of bringing the company together as one portfolio," said Yaccarino, who joined the network in 2011 as president, cable entertainment and digital advertising sales (she previously oversaw sales for Turner Entertainment as evp and COO), adding NBC and Telemundo a year later. Before ramping up her upfront negotiations, Yaccarino talked about plans for next season, her company's big swings and of course, the d-word. Data was the buzzword of the upfronts, but is that continuing during sales meetings? All day long! It's the lead question I get asked from all our customers: "What are you up to, what are you doing, what's next?" Data and technology will change the advertising business in the next five years more than we've seen in the last 30 years. NBCUniversal has such scale, but is owned by a company like Comcast that has such technology and a direct relationship with consumers. When we bring all these things together, that will benefit our advertising clients, and that's what truly consumes most of my days. You rolled out ATP, your audience targeting platform, in January. How will you use it during the upfront? This is the latest in our suite of data products. We knew we wanted to refine the media plans that we have and reduce waste. It reduces waste for us because we get better at managing our inventory, and it reduces waste or enhances what the advertiser is getting based on their deliverables, whatever their RFP says, or their brand briefs. As I like to explain it, it's giving you last year's media plan, but in the nonfat version. C7 was all the rage during last year's upfronts. Are people still talking about that this year, or have priorities shifted? I don't think priorities have shifted, but clients have many different priorities. So while C7 is important to some people, and NBCUniversal is open for business for C7, our data conversations have taken us in a whole new direction. To supplement the current currency that exists, we talk about a bunch of different other deliverables based on the merged data sets.

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How Mad Men, by Looking Back, Changed the Future of Advertising

May 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

"On Stage 9, the wardrobes of the male cast members include white shirts, cuff links, tie clips and hats," Stuart Elliott wrote in his New York Times advertising column in 2006, about a then-unknown cast shooting a pilot. "The female cast members wear long skirts, slips, formidable-looking brassieres and nylon stockings." Elliott would go on to write many columns about the AMC network's Mad Men—which premiered on July 19, 2007 and which, with much fanfare, draws to a close with the series finale on May 17—and he found silver-haired ad executives to be polarized. "Half of the people I talk to from that era are very hard-core fans of the show and say that it is exactly what it was like then," Elliott, who retired from the Times in 2014 after 23 years, tells Adweek. "And half say the show was completely phony and drummed up for dramatic purposes." Whether the series got the era right or not, what cannot be denied is that it has had an immeasurable impact on this one. Here, some of the more significant ways Mad Men changed our world. It made advertising sexy In 2007, procurement departments increasingly were applying the same cost-cutting measures to ad agencies as they did to their copy paper and coffee vendors. Ad executives, priding themselves as trusted advisors, felt slighted—and it didn't help that viewers were gleefully TiVo-ing past their commercials. "The ad business," Elliott recalls, "was kind of in a funk." Enter Jon Hamm as Don Draper. Lantern jawed, crisply dressed and pomaded, he made this pronouncement in the first episode: "Advertising is based on one thing: happiness. And you know what happiness is? Happiness is the smell of a new car. It's freedom from fear. It's a billboard on the side of the road that screams reassurance that whatever you are doing is OK." Music to the ad industry's ears. Bob Jeffrey, who served as worldwide CEO of JWT when the show premiered, notes that it helped provide the industry with a pipeline of aspiring talent

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Why Showtime’s Happyish Defiled the Keebler Elves

April 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For close to five decades, the Keebler Elves have been a genial, wholesome presence in Keebler advertising as they sang the praises of the brand's cookies and crackers. But Sunday's premiere of the new Showtime comedy Happyish quickly changed the Elves' slogan from "Uncommonly Good" to "uncommonly disturbing." In a hallucination by the show's disillusioned ad exec Thom Payne (Steve Coogan), the animated Ernie Keebler, stunned to be fired as Keebler's pitchman after 46 years, drops f-bombs and starts shooting his fellow elves, including Fast Eddie, before turning the gun on himself. Then a stunned Ma Keebler proceeds to disrobe and have sex with Payne.The now-defiled Keebler Elves are just the first of several beloved advertising icons that Happyish skewers during its 10-episode debut season. Created by author Shalom Auslander, who begrudgingly worked in advertising for more than two decades to supplement his writing career, the show routinely takes aim at the business that Auslander loves to hate. "I ended up having this fantastic deal that I got fired from," Auslander said. "I was working for McCann Erickson, living in Woodstock [, N.Y.] and coming in once a month, and sending in ideas and not really caring what happened to them.

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The Future May Belong to Web and Mobile Video, but TV Will Survive

April 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Television is dead! Long live television! This, the ancient cry of royal succession, is entirely appropriate to herald what's happening right now—literally before our eyes—to the medium of television. TV has ruled our lives and lifestyles, our news and entertainment, our politics and (through advertising) our economics since network broadcasting began in 1949. And now its sovereignty is over. Randall Rothenberg Illustration: Alex Fine "Linear TV has been on an amazing 50-year run, [but] Internet TV is starting to grow," Netflix CEO Reed Hastings said earlier this month, in announcing superb earnings for the streaming TV pioneer. "Clearly over the next 20 years, Internet TV is going to replace linear TV." Far be it for me to disagree. For what are the Digital Content NewFronts but an example of the revolution that is roiling television's half-century hegemony? Well, pssst, buddy, let me let you in on a little secret: The princeling that's replacing television … is television. Like the British monarchy or any long-lived royal line, TV has proved remarkably resilient and adaptable during its history. From black-and-white to color, from broadcasting to cable, from 15-minute newscasts to 24-hour news networks, from The Beverly Hillbillies to Mad Men , from wait-until-reruns to on-demand, television has been, is and probably will remain a near-perfect evocation of Darwinism, evolving rapidly to meet changes in technology, consumer interests and marketing needs. True, the changes television is undergoing now are breathtaking, in volume and speed. Prime time has become an anachronism. Today, Emmy-winning, high-quality shows, once the domain only of a specific time and device, are available across multiple devices at any hour of the day. We rarely sit down together as families and friends to watch a TV show after dinner. We watch the programming we love, on our own, several times a day, wherever we happen to be. And that family and friends with whom we hashed it over? That would be our social graph—an ever-present (and ever-growing) real-time feedback loop. The once-unmatchable power of the 30-second spot is also on the decline

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Dannon’s Oikos Helped to Revive Full House, but Won’t Be Around to Enjoy It

April 21, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

More than a year before John Stamos lit a nostalgic bonfire with his announcement of a Full House revival, Oikos Greek yogurt had the same idea. The Dannon brand's 2014 Super Bowl ad reunited spokesman Stamos with his former castmates, Bob Saget and Dave Coulier, and in the process sparked an explosion of buzz among several generations of fans. (The show remains a syndicated hit with today's youth.) So will the brand be basking in the glow of the retro reunion it arguably helped bring into reality? Probably not. A spokesman for parent brand Dannon says its contract with Stamos expired at the end of last year and there are currently no plans to revive it. "John is no longer in our Oikos advertising," said Michael Neuwirth, senior director of public relations for Dannon.

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Former SNL Funnyman Gary Kroeger Gets Serious, Runs for Congress

April 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Gary Kroeger is following in his former Saturday Night Live co-stars footsteps. Like Al Franken, Kroeger is running for Congress. Kroeger, a Cedar Falls native, is running for the democratic nomination in Iowa's first congressional district. Kroeger spent three seasons on SNL, beginning in 1982. He returned to Iowa in 2003 and began working as creative director at Mudd Advertising in Cedar Falls. "I came back for 'Iowa Values' and now I see many of those values being marginalized, even eliminated, and I have to do something about it," Kroeger wrote on his campaign page . "I have to so that my sons can have the opportunities that I had ... and more." In an interview on Mudd's blog in 2011, Kroeger described a typical day at the office: "Busy. Scripts to write, radio commercials to voice, television spots to host, meet with account execs about future creative direction and spots in production. Meet with production teams to create new content for online, television and radio advertising." Another of Kroeger's 1980s SNL cast-mates, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, lives in the fictional world of politics, playing President Selina Meyer on HBO's Veep.

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The Not-So-Funny State of TV Comedy

February 16, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Over the past dozen years of taping Two and a Half Men on Stage 26 on the Warner Bros. lot in Burbank, Calif., Jon Cryer had grown to dread the inevitable last-minute rewrites that would come his way. That is, until Feb. 6, when he wrapped his 262nd and final episode playing Alan Harper on the hit CBS comedy. "This time around, when we shot the very last scene, I kept hoping for rewrites because I just did not want it to end," Cryer explains. "I looked over to the bank of monitors that the writers sit in front of and they were all hugging.

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NBC Says It Will be a ‘Huge Disappointment’ if Super Bowl Doesn’t Break Ratings Records

January 16, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

What is NBC shooting for when it comes to this year's big game? Oh, just 115 million people. It's expected that each Super Bowl

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How Bill Cosby Went From TV’s ‘Most Persuasive’ Pitchman to its Most Radioactive

November 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Three years ago, as Bill Cosby prepared to be inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame as the first winner of the President's Award for Contributions to Advertising, he spoke with Adweek about the honor. When asked about his greatest asset as a hugely successful (and highly lucrative) pitchman of products like Jell-O, Coca-Cola and Crest, Cosby responded, "I think [it's] my believability as a storyteller." Three years later, that believability is in ruins. Past sexual assault allegations against the comedian have resurfaced and snowballed in recent weeks, with every day bringing a shocking, ugly new development. (Tuesday, former supermodel Janice Dickinson told Entertainment Tonight that Cosby drugged and raped her in 1982.) The controversy reached its tipping point late last night, when Netflix announced it was "postponing" the Nov. 28 debut of Cosby's comedy special, Cosby 77. Today, NBC followed suit, pulling the plug on the sitcom it had been developing with the comedian for next season. It's a stunning fall for Cosby. As The Cosby Show dominated the Nielsens in the '80s, the actor had the top Q Score of all entertainers, while New York research firm Video Storyboard Tests named him the most persuasive celebrity commercial pitchman for five consecutive years. Now he's the most radioactive, even to the very network that he helped rescue in the '80s. Putting the horrific allegations aside (disclosure: I worked at People when it published this damning 2006 account of the allegations from five of his accusers, one month after he settled with another accuser out of court. It's a story I'm still stunned never gained traction at the time), Cosby is in this predicament largely because he and his team demonstrated a surprising lack of media savvy for a performer who for decades has had audiences—and advertisers—in the palm of his hand. It started with the ill-conceived decision on Nov. 10 to launch a meme generator for his website, which quickly turned into one of the year's biggest social media debacles . As he granted interviews about loaning works from his art collection to the National Museum of African Art, he ignored questions about the allegations, first with the nonsensical response, "No. Look at the beauty of what we have here," and then with complete silence during an awkward NPR interview . Shortly after, his appearance on the Late Show with David Letterman—a safe haven if there ever was one given Letterman's own previous sex scandals — was canceled . It gets worse: On Sunday, in a statement

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