Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Advertising Leaders Say Britain’s Exit From the EU Is Disappointing but Manageable

June 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—As the United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union sent aftershocks through global markets today, the ad industry's top leaders were all in the same place to hear the news. Like thousands of their colleagues, the heads of advertising's largest holding companies are all in Cannes this week for the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Two of the industry's most influential corporations quickly released statements about the "Brexit" decision, with the recurring theme being one of disappointment mixed with optimism after the polarizing decision by British voters. The final result was 52 percent in favor of leaving the EU and 48 percent against, with young voters overwhelmingly casting their ballots to remain a member of the 28-state group. British Prime Minister David Cameron announced at a press conference this morning that he will be stepping down because "the country requires fresh leadership" after the vote.

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How Experience Marketing Is Becoming a Crucial Ally for the LGBT Community

June 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Right now, it's Pride Month across the world—prime time for me, my community and our supporters to celebrate, advocate and participate in creating greater change and equality for all. We are vocal and visible, two things that helped us gain the stature we have today. Michael Wood Last month, I attended and presented at the LGBT Advertising Week conference in New York, three solid days of info and insights about the LGBT market. Being part of an eclectic mix of professionals —from clients at companies like Google and Macy's to ad and media agency executives—was incredibly empowering and inspiring. As a marketing professional, the content was clear validation that the LGBT community, my community, is a valuable audience that matters—valuable to brands and businesses to the tune of well over $800 billion. As I look back at my own journey and observations over many years of Pride months and beyond, perhaps the most significant and impactful change I've seen is the surge of brands that have made it part of their core ethos to stand with us. That takes guts. They're not just talking the talk, they're walking the walk. And I mean that quite literally. Just look at your local Pride parade to see the array of corporate sponsors and branded employee groups marching in solidarity

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Chicken With a Beef: the Untold Story of Chick-fil-A’s Cow Campaign

June 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stan Richards, founder and creative director of ad agency The Richards Group, was sitting in a routine staff meeting in 1994 when he learned his agency won the Chick-fil-A account. He didn't find out in an email. No phone call came in breaking the good news. Instead, David Salyers—then vp of national and regional marketing at Chick-fil-A—ventured from Atlanta to the agency's Dallas headquarters on a whim. Salyers arrived, unannounced, and boldly walked into the meeting. He stopped whatever conversation was taking place and shook Richards' hand. "We want you to be our new agency," he said with a smile. In that moment, Salyers made a promise to Richards that the agency said still rings true today: "We will never be your biggest client, but we will do everything we can do to be your best client." And, Richards tells Adweek, "that's exactly what they've done over all those years." The underdog chicken In the early '90s, Chick-fil-A was primarily known for being a mall-based fast-food chain, but beginning in 1994, the chain started slowly shifting its focus to freestanding units. With that shift came a new batch of competitors—big burger joints.

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How Advertising on Different Types of Media Affects Sales of Consumer Packaged Goods

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The increase in sales that consumer packaged goods brands can expect as a result of ad campaigns varies widely by the media platform used to distribute those ads, according to a new study presented today by Nielsen Catalina Solutions at the Advertising Research Foundation's Audience Measurement 2016 conference in New York. To determine how spending on media directly affects sales, Nielsen analyzed more than 1,400 campaigns from 450 CPG brands in seven categories (baby, pet, health and beauty, general merchandise, food, beverage, and over-the-counter products) over 11 years and compared that with in-store purchase data. To determine which advertising platforms drove incremental sales, NCS isolated households that had been exposed to certain types of media—TV, online display, video, mobile, cross-platform and magazines—and compared their buying habits with those of unexposed households. The study found that magazines showed the highest return on advertising spend (ROAS) across all CPG categories, with an average return of $3.94 for every ad dollar spent. Display ads followed with an ROAS of $2.63. Digital video had the lowest ROAS at just $1.53. It was a different story, however, when the incremental sales driven by each media platform were compared with other audience metrics, including the number of households exposed to that platform and the number of impressions the campaign created. Nielsen found that TV drove the highest incremental sales per exposed household ($0.33), while display drove the lowest ($0.19). Mobile advertising resulted in the most sales per 1,000 impressions (an additional $26.52), while display ads resulted in the least ($16.96). Nielsen also studied the data for specific CPG categories, determining that baby products had the highest ROAS across all types of media, while over-the-counter had the lowest. Broken down by media platform, display advertising drove the highest ROAS for baby products, pet products and beverages, while magazine ads garnered the highest ROAS for food, general merchandise, health and beauty, and over-the-counter products.

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Legoland’s New Campaign Is ‘Built for Kids’—Just Ask Its Pint-Size CEO

May 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Family summer vacations are in full swing, and if you're headed to Orlando, Fla., chances are that Walt Disney World or Universal Studios are the top destinations you think of. So, Legoland Florida created a hotel and theme park built for kids to stand out. This week, Legoland and VML New York are launching a new spot starring Tommy Parker—the brand's kid CEO as part of Legoland's ongoing "Built for Kids" campaign. The new ads show off all of the cool features of the hotel—like a moat made out of legos and kid-friendly restaurant menus with macaroni and cheese. "The secret to the strategy is not ... trying to compete head-to-head against [our competitors], but actually carving out our own unique space and owning that space unlike any other theme park could," said Rex Jackson, marketing and sales director of Legoland. "I kind of like to think of him as this child of Ferris Bueller and Wes Anderson [with] an imaginative view on the world and he lives in this amazing park—this would be a dream job for any child anywhere," said Mike Wente, VML's managing director and executive creative director. "There's something that's aspirational and beautiful about that but also the way that he thinks and that he borrows some adult language but put through a kid's lens." The 60-second spot is running on regional TV in Florida and includes a big social and digital push. Jackson declined to say how much the campaign costs but said that 50 to 75 percent of the brand's paid social dollars for the rest of the year will go towards the Tommy Parker campaign

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Steve Harvey on Advertising Inequality, His Punishing Schedule and Retirement Plans

May 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For his cover story in last week's issue of Adweek, Steve Harvey talked about how he juggles four hit TV series (soon to be five) and a radio show , and how he survived his Miss Universe debacle and came out the real winner . But with so many shows and project on his plate, there wasn't space in the magazine for everything that Harvey discussed. Here are the best moments that didn't make it into the story, including Harvey's thoughts on his punishing schedule, why his shows don't always bring in the ad revenue that they should and how he plans to spend his retirement: Six shows, three cities Harvey wasn't kidding when he said his mantra is to make every minute count. Filming five TV shows and a radio show requires him to commute between three different cities: Atlanta (his home, where his business offices and radio studio are located, and where he shoots Family Feud 10 weeks each summer, four episodes a day, for 200 shows a season), Chicago (he tapes two episodes of his talk show each Tuesday and Thursday, from late August to May, 140 episodes per year); and Los Angeles (he taped Little Big Shots for a week last October and a weekend in November; Celebrity Family Feud shoots two weekends in March and Dream Funder, his upcoming ABC series, will film on weekends sometime between October and November). And 272 days a year, he records his four-hour morning radio show from whichever location he happens to be in. Harvey works nonstop—sometimes six or seven days a week—except for three weeks around his wedding anniversary every year, and two weeks at Christmas. He knows that five weeks of vacation sounds like a luxury to some, "but it's 47 weeks of high level intensity on-camera, in your face. It's a lot of pressure right now. I can handle it, because I enjoy what I do. But I don't know how long I'll do all of them." (In the story, he said that he plans to walk away from one of his TV shows: "I do love all of these gigs, but something is going to have to go for sure.") Advertising inequality During his cover interview, Harvey spoke out against the industry's tendency to marginalize him as an entertainer who only appeals to minority audiences. His WB sitcom drew ratings similar to those of other shows on the network, like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, yet received fewer ad dollars because it was deemed a "black" show. "We've got to stop that. Pay a person for the number they get, and pay the advertising on the show based on the number that show gets. They find a way to cheapen it by saying, 'Well, you've got too many African-Americans watching here, too many Latinos, not enough whites. They use that just to get a lower rate and that's so unfair, man," said Harvey. "Every corporation has a 'multicultural marketing department,' which is just another word for the blacks and the Mexicans. Really, that's what it is. And that's so ridiculous. Family Feud isn't big because of black people or just white people

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Why Big Digital Video and TV Networks Are Increasingly Becoming Production Partners

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Television its dead—long live television. That could become the unofficial motto, or at least the crawl at the bottom of the screen, to explain the recent flurry of hookups between digital players like BuzzFeed, Vice and Mashable with old-guard media companies such as NBCUniversal, Disney and Turner Broadcasting. While BuzzFeed can get 800,000 people to watch a watermelon explode —live on Facebook—and YouTube claims to reach more consumers 18-49 than any TV network, the digital world obviously thinks TV still has its charms. Hint: massive reach and enviable ad dollars from blue-chip brands. Though it's not the only reason for the current wave of mergers, acquisitions and investment, TV is a driving force for the nascent relationships blurring the line between linear and digital and introducing sexy young things to a platform that is the very definition of old media. "Linear TV is vulnerable, yes, but it's still a monster ," notes media analyst David Deal of David J. Deal Consulting. "And it's not going away." At least one much-sought-after digital darling not only believes this is the case but is making TV a top priority. Vice Media CEO Shane Smith announced the same week as its Digital NewFronts presentation this month that the fast-growing media company known for its grit and swagger is joining forces with ESPN to share, co-create and co-promote sports programming across multiple venues, as part of an overall relationship with Disney. Pillars of the alliance include the award-winning 30 for 30 documentaries from the sports powerhouse telecast on Viceland , Vice's new 24-hour cable network, and Vice's in-your-face-style series on ESPN. "I applaud Shane for understanding that television is the smartest path to worldwide leadership," ESPN president John Skipper was quoted as saying, with just the slightest wink, in Adweek's coverage of the recent NewFronts .

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CP+B Veterans Launch New Miami-Based Agency Markham & Stein

May 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Despite talk of the end of the advertising agency business model, former CP+B executives Jeff Steinhour and Markham Cronin think small to mid-sized creative shops can thrive as long as they focus on producing great creative above all else. The duo, who have more than 50 years of advertising experience between them, felt so strongly about the viability of this narrative that they launched their own full-service agency in Miami in the form of Markham & Stein. "This thing has been a long time coming," said Cronin, who officially opens the new shop with his partner today. After leaving CP+B and leading creative at other agencies, he opened his own operation Markham Unlimited in 2005. But Cronin tells Adweek, "I was spending 20 percent of my time doing the valuable part of my job for clients and the other 80 percent actually running the agency. So when the opportunity came to talk to Jeff about maybe doing this, there was no question it was something we should try and do together." Markham and Steinhour spent 10 years together at CP+B on the creative and accounts sides of the business, respectively.

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Hulu Is Targeting Living Room Viewers With New Interactive Advertising Deals

May 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hulu spent much of last year improving the quality of its content and striking big deals for new and acquired series like Casual, Difficult People, The Mindy Project, 11.22.63 and all nine seasons of Seinfeld. This year, the streaming service is focusing on improving the experience of watching that content, especially in the comfort of viewers' own homes. Hulu's subscriber base has grown more than 30 percent from last year, and will reach 12 million U.S. subscribers by this month. "Hulu is TV, and the fact that 70 percent of our viewing happens in a living room environment just reinforces that idea to the market," said Peter Naylor, svp of advertising sales with Hulu. That's why many of the company's big announcements at Wednesday morning's NewFronts event at the Theater at Madison Square Garden center around initiatives relating to what Naylor calls the "living room," but refer to any viewing via connected TV devices like Roku, Apple TV, PlayStation or smart TVs. Hulu has teamed with interactive advertising company BrightLine to bring interactive advertising to connected TV devices for the first time. Havas Media will be the exclusive charter agency for the new ads, which debut on Hulu this summer. It will allow viewers to interact with the creative itself much as they would on a computer or mobile device. They can click on the ad and be taken to a site or page with details about a particular brand

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Put Away the Selfie Stick and Live Like a Local, Urges Airbnb’s New Campaign

April 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Travelers today, especially those using Airbnb to find lodging around the world, don't want to navigate throngs of other tourists for a glimpse of Times Square or Fisherman's Wharf. According to data from Airbnb, 86 percent of its users pick the platform because they want to live more like a local. That insight of living rather than visiting inspired the brand's latest and largest marketing campaign, "Live There." "Don't go to Paris. Don't tour Paris, and please don't do Paris," the ad's narrator advises over footage of selfie sticks and packed tour boats. Instead, the ad advises, "Live in Paris." The work, from agency TBWAChiatDay is aimed at younger travelers, or at least those young in spirit. It's focused not just on the millennial generation, but also on those who want to eat at local restaurants, meet local artists and avoid tourist traps. According to Airbnb, 52 percent of these younger-minded U.S. travelers find crowds at major tourist attractions to be more stressful than doing a tax return, while 47 percent don't like to be labeled as tourists when they go to a new place. With that in mind, Airbnb CMO Jonathan Mildenhall said he wanted the brand's latest work to push back against the modern tourism industry and capture the idea that people shouldn't simply go to a new place, they should live there, even if only for one night

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