Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Why Agencies Should Spend More Time and Effort Retaining Their Strategy People

October 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The ad industry is losing more talent than it's gaining, according to a LinkedIn study—"The Truth About Strategy Talent"—done in partnership with the 4A's. In 2015, the ad industry experienced a 25 percent net loss of global talent to competing industries, but one area where agencies need to focus a bit more time is the strategy department. According to LinkedIn's data, strategic planners are 30 percent less likely to be satisfied with their current positions. Of those polled for the study, 28 percent said they don't see themselves working in their current positions within the next year and 40 percent see themselves out in less than six months. Additionally, 92 percent said they would be interested in learning about a new job opportunity, while 43 percent are more likely to respond to messages from recruiters about new opportunities, compared to the average agency person. "I think first and foremost that because planners tend to be very curious individuals, the fact that they are so much more likely to respond to a recruiter is not surprising but interesting because I think because they are curious by nature they are more likely to be open to talking to anybody about anything," Nancy Hill, president of the 4A's, said. In comparison to agency talent, strategy people are more likely to look for new job opportunities when they are overlooked for a promotion or when they feel they aren't challenged enough at their current job. "We have to stop looking at strategy people like all they are there to do is inform the brief. They can have so much more of an impact on the clients' business," argued 4A's president Nancy Hill. Added Jann Schwarz, global director of agency and channel development, LinkedIn Marketing Solutions: "The research suggests that, in addition to salary, lack of challenging work and overlooked promotions are key blockers to retaining strategy professionals. Agencies must better align with the underlying factors that motivate employees to stay and make adjustments accordingly." Schwarz noted that these factors are easily addressable, agencies simply need to take the time to address them. The good news is that, according to the data, strategy people don't necessarily want to leave the industry altogether. Compared to other agency talent, strategy talent is 35 percent more likely to look for promotions within the current company. Rather than switching industries, strategy people tend to look at competitive agencies for promotions. LinkedIn collected data for the study through a number of global professional studies including its "Job Switchers" survey and "Talent Trends" survey, as well as LinkedIn data on member behavior as of February 2016. This particular survey marks the first time LinkedIn has done a deep dive into strategy professionals in the advertising industry, and compares those individuals against the rest of the ad business and other industries.

Read More

Brands Are Throwing Out Gender Norms to Reflect a More Fluid World

October 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

James Charles may not seem like the typical ambassador of a beauty brand—and he's not. Meet CoverGirl's first CoverBoy. No doubt the half-century-old brand raised a few eyebrows last week when it introduced its latest model. But this was no mere stunt. Coty's CoverGirl says Charles will be an important part of growing the brand moving forward. At a time when gender identity and the turning on their head of gender roles are dominating the conversation, the move shouldn't seem so controversial. "We're more in the gender fluid space," explains Samantha Skey, president and chief revenue officer of SheKnows Media. As gender stereotypes lose favor culturally, marketers would be wise to promote that a "product is for a certain kind of hair or a certain kind of body type," says Skey, because "you can subscribe to that hair or that body type regardless of who you are." Demographic insights support that thinking

Read More

USAA Consolidates With Publicis Less Than a Year After Racist Email Scandal at Former Agency

October 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

USAA, the largest provider of insurance and other financial products to U.S. military members, has consolidated its marketing business with a cluster of Publicis Groupe agencies after a formal review that lasted several months. Starting in the second quarter of 2017, all USAA work currently handled by other agencies will be transitioned to the Publicis umbrella group. The news comes less than a year after a scandal involving a racist email sent by an executive at USAA's former agency of record, Campbell Ewald, made international headlines and inspired a new round of conversations about diversity in the advertising industry. Earlier this year, Publicis Groupe announced it would transition to a more collaborative model, and several of its shops will work on the USAA business.

Read More

Agency London in New York Literally Set Up a Work Space Inside the Metropolitan Opera House

September 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Many ad agency executives' jobs take them to unique locations. But very few have had the opportunity to work in an environment quite like this one. London in New York, a new shop founded by partners and co-creative directors Carolyn London and Michael Vadino, launched this month. And unlike every other agency in New York, its principals recently worked from inside the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. During the time London spent working alongside the Met's in-house marketing team, a rack of elaborate costumes sat down the hall from their work space and a morning trip to the basement cafeteria for a cup of coffee might have involved sharing a table with members of the Bolshoi ballet, costumed soldiers, child opera singers or the star of La Boheme. This relationship was a first for the 133-year-old Met, which recently launched a campaign to promote a new season that opens on Sept. 26.

Read More

Can Michael J. Fox Help This New Insurance Company Thrive With a Focus on Optimism?

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Do you view insurance companies as soulless corporate monoliths powered by greed and shamefully disconnected from the customers they serve? Yeah, that's what a lot of us believe. And Sonnet, an online insurer launching today in Canada, aims to dispel such notions by flogging optimism in ads created by Johannes Leonardo. Speaking of launches, the spot below presents a mission control/blast-off scenario, with shots of earnest flight controllers and a rather unusual rocket rocket rising from the pad, punctuated by a Michael J. Fox voiceover that begins, "It took us to the stars. Overcame countless obstacles. It wasn't a single bright mind. Or money

Read More

Turner Will Continue Reduced Ad Loads on TNT Next Year, and Could Expand to TBS in 2018

August 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Turner's experiment with reduced ad loads of up to 50 percent on TNT's new drama Animal Kingdom this summer has been so successful that the company is already planning on expanding its scope over the next two years. TNT will offer 50 percent reduced ad loads on all its new original dramas in 2017, and could also expand that offering to TBS' original series in 2018, TNT and TBS president Kevin Reilly told reporters today at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour in Los Angeles. "We're seeing very, very good results for that," said Reilly, who is also chief creative officer for Turner Entertainment, of Animal Kingdom's ad load reduction, which has added 10 minutes or more of content per episode. "Not only is the commercial rating higher, but we're also seeing a nice ratings lift." Reilly said Turner is still waiting on more data, but "we've seen indications there will be a higher brand recall." Focus groups have noted that "you really see the difference," he added. There was a "robust" response to TNT's reduced ad loads in this year's upfront, where Turner secured double-digit CPM gains . Turner ad sales chief Donna Speciale and her team sold reduced ad loads for new TNT dramas during the upfront, but "I want to do it across the board," said Reilly, who said the approach "has been embraced by the advertising community. That said, "we can not go it alone," he said, and if other networks don't follow suit with similar ad load reductions, "we're going to have to go back." For now, his shows have shorter breaks, instead of fewer breaks, but "we're still playing with that," said Reilly. Beyond the reduced ad loads, Reilly said "some of our native advertising efforts have really been great." He cited Maya Rudolph's "vajingle" spot for Seventh Generation tampons on Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, which went viral after it aired last month. "I heard from women, 'that's finally the way those things should be sold,'" said Reilly.

Read More

Advertising Leaders Say Britain’s Exit From the EU Is Disappointing but Manageable

June 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—As the United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union sent aftershocks through global markets today, the ad industry's top leaders were all in the same place to hear the news. Like thousands of their colleagues, the heads of advertising's largest holding companies are all in Cannes this week for the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Two of the industry's most influential corporations quickly released statements about the "Brexit" decision, with the recurring theme being one of disappointment mixed with optimism after the polarizing decision by British voters. The final result was 52 percent in favor of leaving the EU and 48 percent against, with young voters overwhelmingly casting their ballots to remain a member of the 28-state group. British Prime Minister David Cameron announced at a press conference this morning that he will be stepping down because "the country requires fresh leadership" after the vote.

Read More

How Experience Marketing Is Becoming a Crucial Ally for the LGBT Community

June 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Right now, it's Pride Month across the world—prime time for me, my community and our supporters to celebrate, advocate and participate in creating greater change and equality for all. We are vocal and visible, two things that helped us gain the stature we have today. Michael Wood Last month, I attended and presented at the LGBT Advertising Week conference in New York, three solid days of info and insights about the LGBT market. Being part of an eclectic mix of professionals —from clients at companies like Google and Macy's to ad and media agency executives—was incredibly empowering and inspiring. As a marketing professional, the content was clear validation that the LGBT community, my community, is a valuable audience that matters—valuable to brands and businesses to the tune of well over $800 billion. As I look back at my own journey and observations over many years of Pride months and beyond, perhaps the most significant and impactful change I've seen is the surge of brands that have made it part of their core ethos to stand with us. That takes guts. They're not just talking the talk, they're walking the walk. And I mean that quite literally. Just look at your local Pride parade to see the array of corporate sponsors and branded employee groups marching in solidarity

Read More

Chicken With a Beef: the Untold Story of Chick-fil-A’s Cow Campaign

June 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stan Richards, founder and creative director of ad agency The Richards Group, was sitting in a routine staff meeting in 1994 when he learned his agency won the Chick-fil-A account. He didn't find out in an email. No phone call came in breaking the good news. Instead, David Salyers—then vp of national and regional marketing at Chick-fil-A—ventured from Atlanta to the agency's Dallas headquarters on a whim. Salyers arrived, unannounced, and boldly walked into the meeting. He stopped whatever conversation was taking place and shook Richards' hand. "We want you to be our new agency," he said with a smile. In that moment, Salyers made a promise to Richards that the agency said still rings true today: "We will never be your biggest client, but we will do everything we can do to be your best client." And, Richards tells Adweek, "that's exactly what they've done over all those years." The underdog chicken In the early '90s, Chick-fil-A was primarily known for being a mall-based fast-food chain, but beginning in 1994, the chain started slowly shifting its focus to freestanding units. With that shift came a new batch of competitors—big burger joints.

Read More

How Advertising on Different Types of Media Affects Sales of Consumer Packaged Goods

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The increase in sales that consumer packaged goods brands can expect as a result of ad campaigns varies widely by the media platform used to distribute those ads, according to a new study presented today by Nielsen Catalina Solutions at the Advertising Research Foundation's Audience Measurement 2016 conference in New York. To determine how spending on media directly affects sales, Nielsen analyzed more than 1,400 campaigns from 450 CPG brands in seven categories (baby, pet, health and beauty, general merchandise, food, beverage, and over-the-counter products) over 11 years and compared that with in-store purchase data. To determine which advertising platforms drove incremental sales, NCS isolated households that had been exposed to certain types of media—TV, online display, video, mobile, cross-platform and magazines—and compared their buying habits with those of unexposed households. The study found that magazines showed the highest return on advertising spend (ROAS) across all CPG categories, with an average return of $3.94 for every ad dollar spent. Display ads followed with an ROAS of $2.63. Digital video had the lowest ROAS at just $1.53. It was a different story, however, when the incremental sales driven by each media platform were compared with other audience metrics, including the number of households exposed to that platform and the number of impressions the campaign created. Nielsen found that TV drove the highest incremental sales per exposed household ($0.33), while display drove the lowest ($0.19). Mobile advertising resulted in the most sales per 1,000 impressions (an additional $26.52), while display ads resulted in the least ($16.96). Nielsen also studied the data for specific CPG categories, determining that baby products had the highest ROAS across all types of media, while over-the-counter had the lowest. Broken down by media platform, display advertising drove the highest ROAS for baby products, pet products and beverages, while magazine ads garnered the highest ROAS for food, general merchandise, health and beauty, and over-the-counter products.

Read More