6 Father’s Day Gift Ideas for Creative and Techie Dads

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, the Adweek staff is highlighting Bel & Bel's Vespa-inspired desk chair, a smart grill and more goods that are perfect for Father's Day gifting.

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Why Vice Won’t Have Reviews on Its Upcoming Gaming Channel

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It already counts 11 verticals covering everything from news and sports to women's issues, music, food and tech. Now Vice is planning to expand its scope even further, pulling back the curtain today on a gaming vertical that was first announced at the company's NewFront presentation last month. The as-yet unnamed channel, set to fully launch in the fall, will focus on gaming culture, big and small, through personal storytelling. "It's probably the biggest medium today for communications," Joel Fowler, publisher of the new vertical, told Adweek. Fowler also runs Vice's EDM and culture channel, Thump. Vice already produces gaming-related content for Motherboard and The Creators Project , but will now have its own "dedicated place where we can devote resources," explained Fowler. "We see it more as doubling down on all the gaming content that we've been doing." Vice is debuting the first episode of Pixel by Pixel, the first video series for the vertical, during this year's Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3. Vice partnered with Twitch to stream the episode live during its E3 broadcast later this afternoon. The series profiles indie game developers in the weeks leading up to the release of their projects. The first episode follows Alex Preston, creator of Hyper Light Drifter. The game is autobiographical in nature. Preston was born with a serious congenital heart defect. The game's main character confronts challenges he must resolve before he dies. Vice will roll out the first episode for each of the five new shows in the coming months leading up to the site's launch; all five videos will be sponsored by Taco Bell. By late summer, Vice will debut the first episode of esports-themed series Versus, which will center on the game Smite.

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How Advertising on Different Types of Media Affects Sales of Consumer Packaged Goods

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The increase in sales that consumer packaged goods brands can expect as a result of ad campaigns varies widely by the media platform used to distribute those ads, according to a new study presented today by Nielsen Catalina Solutions at the Advertising Research Foundation's Audience Measurement 2016 conference in New York. To determine how spending on media directly affects sales, Nielsen analyzed more than 1,400 campaigns from 450 CPG brands in seven categories (baby, pet, health and beauty, general merchandise, food, beverage, and over-the-counter products) over 11 years and compared that with in-store purchase data. To determine which advertising platforms drove incremental sales, NCS isolated households that had been exposed to certain types of media—TV, online display, video, mobile, cross-platform and magazines—and compared their buying habits with those of unexposed households. The study found that magazines showed the highest return on advertising spend (ROAS) across all CPG categories, with an average return of $3.94 for every ad dollar spent. Display ads followed with an ROAS of $2.63. Digital video had the lowest ROAS at just $1.53. It was a different story, however, when the incremental sales driven by each media platform were compared with other audience metrics, including the number of households exposed to that platform and the number of impressions the campaign created. Nielsen found that TV drove the highest incremental sales per exposed household ($0.33), while display drove the lowest ($0.19). Mobile advertising resulted in the most sales per 1,000 impressions (an additional $26.52), while display ads resulted in the least ($16.96). Nielsen also studied the data for specific CPG categories, determining that baby products had the highest ROAS across all types of media, while over-the-counter had the lowest. Broken down by media platform, display advertising drove the highest ROAS for baby products, pet products and beverages, while magazine ads garnered the highest ROAS for food, general merchandise, health and beauty, and over-the-counter products.

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Instagram Ads Now Include Mobile Banners

June 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Slowly but surely, Instagram is turning into a direct-response platform for brands, and now calls-to-action look a little bit more like banner ads than highly styled and edited posts. The Facebook-owned app is rolling out a feature that links ads to profile pages so that when someone clicks on an ad from the news feed, a banner pops up at the bottom of the screen. The banner prompts people to take an action, like to visit a website or download an app. Clicking on the banner pulls up a website within Instagram. Here is how the experience looks from clicking on an ad. According to an Instagram rep, so-called "profile taps" will be included in click reporting for advertisers and are rolling out internationally. In a statement, Instagram said, "We found that Instagrammers were routinely tapping on a company's name from a direct response ad to learn more. Now when that happens, the call-to-action button from that same ad extends to the company's profile page to make it easier for people to discover a business they care about." The call-to-action is Instagram's latest step in turning the mobile app into a direct response channel for marketers since opening up its API last year

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Snapchat Launches a Colossal Expansion of Its Advertising, Ushering in a New Era for the App

June 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Imran Khan was an internet-focused investment banker at Credit Suisse, where, in September 2014, he orchestrated Chinese ecommerce giant Alibaba's high-profile IPO. Three months later, his star rose even higher when he was named Snapchat's first chief strategy officer , charged, many observers figured, with prepping the tech darling for its own eventual IPO. But in fact, Khan's marching orders from CEO Evan Spiegel at the outset were more fluid than one might imagine. "I was, like, the 171st employee. And in a small company, you don't have a defined role—you just jump in and start doing things," recalls the executive. You just jump in and start doing things. Those eight words could serve as a pithy user manual for newcomers to Snapchat and its array of unusual features that have confounded more than a few folks who were born before 1985. It's part of the job of Khan, 39, to "get" what Gen Y loves so much about the app, transforming their days into mobile reality TV episodes with stories (what Snapchat calls posts) they share with friends, a kaleidoscope of colorful filters, face-swapping effects and other, often wacky functions. Khan and his army (the company is now 900 employees strong) have basically flipped the script on the advertising community, where, not so long ago, it was widely assumed that Snapchat's leadership was too immature to fully take advantage of its teen-idol status among millennials

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‘The Voice’ Finalist and YouTube Star Christina Grimmie Murdered After Concert

June 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Orlando police believe a deranged fan may have been behind the brazen murder of rising music star Christina Grimmie who was a finalist on NBC's The Voice in the spring of 2014. "The suspect traveled to Orlando apparently to commit this crime and had plans to travel back to where he came from," said Orlando police chief John Mina in a Saturday morning news conference. By Saturday afternoon, police had identified the suspect as 27-year-old Kevin James Loibl of St. Petersburg, Fla. OPD can confirm 27 year old Kevin James Loibl, suspect who shot Christina Grimmie, is from St Petersburg, FL pic.twitter.com/iN6RUi3VRx — Orlando Police (@OrlandoPolice) June 11, 2016 After a performance at Orlando's Plaza Live Friday night, Grimmie was signing autographs when Loibl walked up to her and shot her. Grimmie's brother tackled the suspect, who then shot himself. Grimmie, 22, who placed in the top 3 of The Voice season 6 as part of Adam Levine's team, was a rising pop star who counts more than 3.2 million subscribers on her YouTube channel. In fact, she was discovered by the step-father of superstar Selena Gomez on YouTube 6 years ago

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How Iron Maiden Made the Boeing 747 Badass Again

June 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Celebrity endorsements are a cornerstone of advertising nowadays, but an industrial manufacturing giant like Boeing seldom gets the chance to play that game. What celebrity is going to tout stuff like cargo hold capacity and cruising range? Well, Boeing's chance came several weeks ago, when one of its 747-400 jumbo jets touched down at the company's manufacturing plant in Everett, Wash., with Captain Bruce Dickinson at the controls. Dickinson is better known as the frontman for Iron Maiden , the British heavy-metal band that's sold over 90 million records in a career spanning four decades. The 57-year-old Dickinson's talent for soaring applies to more than his voice: Since the 1990s, he's also held a commercial pilot's license. Iron Maiden is currently in the middle of a six-continent, 35-city tour in a chartered 747. And Dickinson is doing all the flying. Iron Maiden vocalist Bruce Dickenson (center, foreground) is also a commercial pilot.

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Nashville Will Move to CMT for Season 5 After ABC Gave It the Ax

June 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nashville is back from the dead. The Connie Britton and Hayden Panettiere drama, which ABC canceled last month after four seasons, is moving to CMT for Season 5. CMT will air all 22 episodes of Nashville's fifth season (which will continue to film in Nashville), while Hulu will be the show's exclusive streaming partner, making all episodes available for streaming the day after they air on CMT. Hulu already had SVOD rights to Nashville's previous four seasons. "CMT heard the fans. The wave of love and appreciation they have unleashed for Nashville has been overwhelming," said CMT president Brian Philips in a statement. "Nashville is a perfect addition to our evolving line-up of big music specials, documentaries and original series. We see our fans and ourselves in this show and we will treasure it like no other network. Nashville belongs on CMT." So far, Nashville is the only series canceled during the 2015-16 TV season to find a new home. Last season, only one canceled show moved to a new outlet: The Mindy Project, which has continued on Hulu after Fox dropped it. Lionsgate, which produces Nashville along with ABC Studios and Opry Entertainment, had been aggressively searching for a new home. In March, the studio signed Marshall Herskovitz and Ed Zwick (executive producers of My So-Called Life and thirtysomething) to step in as showrunners of a potential fifth season. Lionsgate was so confident the show would continue that it ended Season 4 with a cliffhanger, which left the fate of Hayden Panettiere's Juliette Barnes up in the air after her plane had gone missing, instead of a happier ending. "There's a little short-term pain but ultimately long-term gain because we intend and are quite focused and are in substantive and serious conversations with multiple buyers about continuing the show on another platform," Lionsgate TV chairman Kevin Beggs told The Hollywood Reporter last month. "If we didn't feel that was going to happen, we might have gone a different way." CMT was an ideal fit for the network, thanks to its country music audience and the network's decision this year to branch out into scripted series, which represents "a quantum leap" for the network, Philips told Adweek in March. The network's first scripted series, Still the King (starring Billy Ray Cyrus as a washed-up, one-hit-wonder singer who discovers he has a 15-year-old daughter), premieres Sunday night.

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Infographic: Who’s Winning the Race on YouTube, Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump?

June 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Donald Trump is usually quick to boast about how much he's winning—in politics, in business, etc., etc., etc. But now, it appears he's winning on YouTube as well, according to web analytics firm Zefr. Zefr's analysis of YouTube views for the month of May found that videos about the presumptive Republican nominee have amassed many millions more views than the combined total of Democrat rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Views of Trump-related videos increased by 42.8 percent from April to May to a total of 254 million. Meanwhile, the total 106 million views of Clinton-related videos were only up 0.68 percent from the previous month. Total views for Sanders videos fell 16.25 percent to 69.7 million. "If all publicity is indeed good publicity, then Trump has a huge advantage," said Dave Rosner, Zefr's evp of strategic marketing. However, nearly half of Trump-related views (47 percent) were for videos that expressed a negative sentiment about the candidate, while only 17 percent were positive. (The remaining 36 percent were neutral.) For Clinton, sentiment was even more negative—48 percent compared with 4 percent positive and 47 percent neutral

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Outdoor Company Yeti Celebrates Father’s Day With Emotional Video Series

June 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Many outdoor enthusiasts developed their passions for hunting or fishing by learning from their dads. Last week, Yeti, maker of coolers and other outdoor gear, launched "My Old Man," a mini-documentary series that celebrates fatherhood and its role in outdoor pursuits. The subjects in Yeti's six to eight-minute videos, which launched last week, all represent demographics within the brand's target audiences. "We wanted to connect with our core audience over their shared passions," said Sara Kenton, senior director of digital at Yeti. Over footage of hunting trips in Hawaii with his young son, pro surfer Shane Dorian talks about how he took fewer risks in surfing after becoming a father of two and discusses how he's passing his hunting techniques along to his son. Musician J.T.

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