Cannes Film Review: ‘Mimosas’

May 21, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Those familiar with the ethnographic works of Ben Rivers (who gets a thanks in the closing credits) and the films of Argentine director Lisandro Alonso ("Jauja") will find much to admire in the movie's combination of spiritual musings and stunning landscapes.

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Fashion Brands, Long Focused on Excess, Are Finally Waking Up to Sustainability

May 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Yael Aflalo, founder of buzzy fashion retailer Reformation, experienced first-hand the scale of Chinese pollution, she made a decision. Today, her company has a near-religious focus on reducing waste by incorporating sustainable practices throughout its supply chain. Ana Andejelic Reformation's motto: "We make killer clothes that don't kill the environment." Reformation gets that people increasingly make buying decisions based on evaluation that is simultaneously monetary and social. For fashion brands, that means fashion and sustainability must co-exist. When people buy pieces of Reformation clothing, they pay for the knowledge of how and where each item was made. They're paying a premium not just for the great fit and quality of Reformation's products or to wear the badge of a hot brand, but also for something they believe. Of course, there are plenty of people who maniacally buy clothes just because they are cheap. But there is an increasing number of fashion consumers who redefine what the price for a piece of clothing means; for them, a price is also appraisal, praise and prize. It's not surprising then that the fastest-growing fashion upstarts today sit precisely at this intersection of doing good and doing well, of price and praise.

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Film Review: ‘Bobby Sands: 66 Days’

May 20, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Veteran documentarian Brendan J. Bryne’s feature does an excellent job contextualizing this famous chapter for viewers not already steeped in modern Irish history.

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These 5 Great Campaigns Won Black and White Pencils at 2016 D&AD

May 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two Black Pencils, three White Pencils and 61 Yellow Pencils were handed out Thursday night in London at the 54th D&AD Professional Awards Ceremony. Winning an ultra-exclusive Black Pencil were U.K. technology startup what3words for "The World Addressed," a campaign to gives every 3-by-3-meter square in the world an address; and Japanese design firm iyamadesign for its spatial design of the "mt expo 2015" on behalf of masking tape brand Kamoi Kakoshi. See videos about those campaigns here: Adweek responsive video player used on /video. Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

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Budweiser Delivers Basketball Fans the First NBA Virtual Reality Experience

May 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Budweiser is playing the virtual reality game, literally, by sponsoring a VR experience with the NBA's Cleveland Cavaliers. The Cavs are the first NBA team to build VR technology into their official app, and Budweiser is giving away cardboard VR headsets at tonight's NBA playoff game in Cleveland, through which fans can view basketball-themed footage. The cardboard headset also doubles as a handy beer carrying case. "As a company, we are always looking for new ways to bring fans closer to the teams they love, and virtual reality is a big part of that," said Lucas Herscovici, vp of consumer connections at Anheuser Busch, in a statement. "The Cavs have been great partners in helping us activate this technology in the NBA and we look forward to continuing to evolve this activation." The four VR videos on the team's app and Budweiser's VR YouTube channel include a tour of the Cavaliers' locker room and a courtside view of the national anthem and player introductions. The Cavaliers launched their VR video series earlier this month, and will continue to roll out more videos throughout the playoffs.

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European Union Mulls 20% Content Quota for Netflix and Amazon Prime

May 19, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The European Commission, the European Union’s executive arm, is mulling a move to impose a 20% European content quota on video streaming sites like Netflix and Amazon Prime. More to follow.

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Future of Telenovelas Split at Telemundo and Univision as the Genre Evolves

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Much like their American cousin the soap opera, telenovelas, which originated in Latin America, have the same sappy tone, breakneck production schedule and five-times-a-week run. But as U.S. Hispanic audiences get younger and savvier, the two leading Spanish-language TV networks in the U.S. are going their separate ways when it comes to the prime-time staple. As Univision doubles down on its production of telenovelas, Telemundo is moving away from them. At its upfront presentation at New York's Lyric Theatre Tuesday morning, Univision evp and CMO Jessica Rodriguez announced the network is in production on 15 new telenovelas. Unlike, Telemundo, which prides itself on producing much of its own content at studios in Miami and Los Angeles, Univision imports its content from Mexican network and production house Grupo Televisa. "Drama is our prime-time TV mainstay. The telenovela is a deeply embedded part of our culture," Rodriguez said, acknowledging, "even the best of genres needs to evolve." So Televisa, which has an ownership stake in Univision, spent 18 months studying the U.S. Hispanic audience. They found them to be younger and more educated and are viewers who seek "strong independent protagonists and stories that are crisp, and don't take so long to unfold," said Jose Antonio 'Pepe' Baston, president of Television and Content for Grupo Televisa. In a taped appearance, Baston said the intent was to "create content that is more relevant to our huge U.S. Hispanic audience." In contrast, at a press event last week held before its combined upfront with NBCU on Monday, Telemundo president Luis Silberwasser announced the network was moving away from telenovelas, while continuing to produce prime-time dramas it calls "super series." The Telemundo shows are darker: more guns and grit, less love and lust. One show, El Chema, bears a striking resemblance to the story of El Chapo, right down to the daring underground prison escape. Telemundo is also in production of three serialized dramas and two mini-series, including an expansive period piece called Cortes, Conquistador de Mexico. Meanwhile, Telemundo digital is keeping the network in the telenovela game, partnering with BuzzFeed on a 10-part series that has "all the elements of a telenovela, with a modern twist," said Peter Blacker, Telemundo's evp of digital. All of this comes on the heels of NBC canceling a sitcom named for the genre.

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Turner Is Opening a Branded Content Studio With Conan O’Brien’s Team Coco

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Turner's upfront presentation will kick off later this morning at The Theater at Madison Square Garden, but the media company, which like NBC, holds one showcase for all of its brands, gave a peek at what it will tell ad buyers. Chief among them is the creation of its own branded content studio with Conan O'Brien's Team Coco digital and social engagement team. The Team Coco Digital Studio will be headed by Conan executive producer Jeff Ross and Steve Beslow, general manager of Team Coco Digital, with Turner's content partnership and ad sales teams. Turner says that while the content studio will be focused on digital and social platforms, it won't shy away if an advertiser wants to use it for a brand integration on Conan. TNT, which is set to debut new series Animal Kingdom in June and Good Behavior in the fall, will add three new shows for 2017.

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How Treating Employees Well Boosts Brand Value

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This election season is putting issues like the fight for a higher minimum wage front and center, shining a light on how corporations treat their workers. And what's become clear is those companies that take care of their employees—and let their customers know about it—stand to boost their brand value. According to a recent Interbrand study, consumers' purchase consideration for both b-to-b and b-to-c brands is higher—and they're willing to pay more—if a company treats its employees well. Eighty-four percent of consumers consider a company's social commitments, including employee treatment, before deciding what to buy or where to shop, and 82 percent consider them when it comes to which products and services to recommend to friends, according to a 2015 study on global corporate social responsibility (CSR) by Cone Communications. "Branding used to be about what's happening outside of your door, but, increasingly, about 75 percent of the work that brands do is more squarely focused on how they get the greatest performance out of their employees, and how they lessen the gap between the executives and the front line [employees]," said Andrea Sullivan, CMO at Interbrand. Some companies, like Chobani, are literally sharing their wealth with their workforce. In April, the company's CEO, Hamdi Ulukaya, introduced a growth-sharing plan that gives full-time employees units that are worth around 10 percent of the company if it is sold or goes public. "It's always been Hamdi's dream for Chobani's success to be shared across the company," said Michael Gonda, vp of corporate communications at Chobani.

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This Shop Has a Creative Take on Media—It’s Not Just Following Trends

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who (L. to r.) CEO Greg March, COO Lindsay Lustberg and chief creative strategist Todd Alchin What Creative media agency Where New York and Los Angeles Before forming Noble People in 2011, Greg March, Lindsay Lustberg, Todd Alchin and Jason Clement worked as media executives at some of the industry's most acclaimed creative agencies: Wieden + Kennedy, Crispin Porter + Bogusky and Droga5. That experience provided a different way to approach media than the usual that often focuses on financial incentives over results. "At Noble we're not innovating around monetization," said CEO March. "That means pushing harder for more impactful insights and having the courage to not chase the silly buzzword or trend of the moment." This strategy has helped them win the business of companies like PayPal, Fresh Direct and Honest Tea. Last December, for PayPal subsidiary Braintree, the agency's research suggested that the client's target audience—web developers—would respond well to a campaign that hid messages in the source codes of popular tech. When the results came in, there was a 62 percent increase in brand awareness and a 92 percent lift in Braintree sign-ups. This story first appeared in the May 16, 2016 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.

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