Iggy Pop Has Some Totally Insane (and Some Actually Pretty Cool) Ideas for Advertisers

June 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—Note to Deutsch: Iggy Pop has some ideas for your Volkswagen advertising. But you're going to have to keep a very open mind. The punk legend had an entertaining chat with Grey chairman and chief creative officer Nils Leonard on the main stage in the Palais at Cannes Lions here Wednesday. (It was the latest installment of the annual Grey Music Seminar.) And it included a surprising amount of Iggy-as-creative-director, weighing in on advertising, which he clearly treats with a fair amount of skepticism even as he has no problem making a buck now and then off endorsements himself. "I don't know much about advertising, other than I've done six or eight fairly major ads as a subject," he said. "Volkswagen has had problems lately because they were naughty. They lied about the omissions, blah blah blah. And I thought, you know, when I was in college, there was a wonderful spontaneous gesture that swept the colleges all over America. Kids would try to see how many people they could get into a Volkswagen Beetle. A revival of that—something that's just fun—would be probably worth 25 corporate mea culpas." So far so good. But Iggy wants to spice it up a little. "You could do it naked on the internet!" he exclaimed, chuckling to himself as he brightened to the idea. "Have different kinds of people. How many tall people? How many short people? How many Armenians could you fit in a Volkswagen? People would forget about the emissions! Or maybe cover a Volkswagen with a sign on it that says, 'Naughty.' And have women in bondage gear whipping it. Punish that Volkswagen! Maybe a giant robocop comes in. Elicit sympathy for the Volkswagen! I'll bet people wouldn't 'Skip Ad'! " The reference to Armenians was an amusing callback to an earlier back-and-forth with Leonard about Kim Kardashian, whom Pop defended—mildly—as an inspiration to other young Armenian women, and a somewhat alternative vision of beauty amid the current Western ideal. "She's got a big old Armenian butt, and little Armenian legs, and is a nice-looking Armenian beauty," Pop said

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Is There a Formula for Success at Cannes?

June 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Cannes Lions, the biggest advertising event in the world, is here. Vive les ads! Brands and agencies are keeping their fingers crossed that their campaigns will win the hearts and eyes of the judging panel in the south of France. But just what makes a Cannes winner? Is there something in the DNA of an ad that makes an award winner? Is there a formula for Lions success? Unruly dug into the data to find out if previous Grand Prix winners had anything in common that helped them stand out from the crowd. We analyzed four previous Cannes winners—Geico's "Unskippable: Family" (2015), Volvo Trucks' "Epic Split" (2014), Metro Trains Melbourne's "Dumb Ways to Die" (2013) and Nike's "Write the Future" (2011)—to see if there were any key themes or insights to success at Cannes. Here are the results: Winning Critical Success Didn't Necessarily Drive Business Results While these videos undoubtedly are beautifully made, highly recognized in the industry and worthy of creative accolades, brand recall and brand favorability from our panel were surprisingly lower than the industry average. Geico was the only advertiser to exceed global averages, including brand favorability (40 percent), purchase intent (40 percent) and brand recall (89 percent). Global averages are generally 29 percent for brand favorability, 31 percent for purchase intent and 74 percent for brand recall. This was most likely due to the prominent Geico logo, which appeared at the five-second mark of the "Unskippable" ad and remained on screen while the silent family held their poses.

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Film Review: ‘Dr. Feelgood’

June 21, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Eve Marson’s documentary examines the case of a Virginian physician whose work with chronic-pain patients eventually got him convicted on numerous counts of “large-scale drug trafficking.”

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Why Big Brands Are Suddenly Getting Cozy With Reddit

June 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just six months ago, Reddit—whose famous slogan is "The front page of the internet"—was a dangerous place for marketers because of its reputation as a pool of trolling and harassment. Now, the viral-minded site is trying to flip the narrative and draw in advertisers with new ad targeting and buying technology and an in-house studio that specializes in creating custom content. And heavy-hitter brands including Coca-Cola, eBay and Procter & Gamble have all come on board in recent months. "What makes Reddit distinct from an advertising perspective are the same qualities that make it distinct in organic spaces," explained Zubair Jandali, vp of sales at Reddit. "We have 70,000 active communities—few places on the web have audiences that are as passionate as ours." Data backs up Jandali's claim. The publisher's traffic hit 51.4 million monthly users in May, up from 28.4 million a year before, according to comScore. It's the kind of stat that seemingly flies in the face of accusations that Reddit's audience is too niche—and sometimes too cruel—for brands to take seriously. But the goal is simple: capitalize on the massive momentum around native advertising with a specialized team to create content, much like the in-house agencies that have made big-name publishers including The New York Times, The Atlantic and Vox Media leaders in the space

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Film Review: ‘The Wonderful Kingdom of Papa Alaev’

June 20, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Profiles a long-running family musical act whose joyful musicality onstage is somewhat belied by the discordant notes hit behind the scenes.

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The Inside Story on J&J’s Revamped Marketing Mission Under Alison Lewis

June 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In the brand-new and buttoned-up New Brunswick, N.J., corporate offices of Johnson & Johnson , there's a conference room whose glass doors are adorned with an aqua decal of a baby's head, plus a couch that features two decorative pillows whose pattern is a mishmash of J&J brand logos and packaging. One could easily mistake this conference room for that of any other billion-dollar conglomerate—except the relentless branding won't let you forget where you are. It's a warm day in mid-May and Alison Lewis , the first global chief marketing officer of the consumer packaged-goods giant's consumer brands, would rather be interviewed here. Her office is messy, she insists, and meeting in the impersonal space allows us to briefly focus on the interior design—specifically, the pillows. "We market everywhere," Lewis jokes. Indeed, the pillows represent an almost literal manifestation of the marketer's current mission. J&J does, actually, market everywhere—investing $1.12 billion in marketing in the U.S. alone in 2015, per Kantar Media, and an estimated $2.5 billion globally, according to reports. But how exactly the company markets everywhere has changed dramatically since Lewis joined. She has streamlined the marketing efforts of over 100 disparate brands—all of which had various marketing operations functioning simultaneously but not necessarily cohesively—into one centralized force. On top of that, Lewis says, she has been working to "globalize brands that in some cases didn't have as much scale in certain parts of the world." Top priority? The namesake, Johnson's, as well as Listerine, Neutrogena and Carefree. It's a gargantuan task—not only because of the scale of J&J's marketing but also because the consumer group's 2015 revenue of $13.5 billion was down 6.8 percent versus 2014, while first-quarter revenue this year was down another 5.8 percent. (J&J's other two businesses, pharmaceuticals and medical products, are not part of this story.) But by all accounts, Lewis, who turns 49 this month, is unphased and ready to tackle all challenges. Ask anyone to describe her and you'll get variations on a theme, and the message usually goes something like this: She's a pragmatic and inspiring leader with a bold vision who tries to empower her people (she manages over 400 employees) to deliver.

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New Microsite Lets You See How Degas Would Have Painted Your Garden

June 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The impressionism movement in painting ended 124 years ago. Even so, wouldn't it be cool if you could see how Degas or Van Gogh would have painted your front yard—or, for that matter, your kid or your pet? Well, a new microsite lets you find out. To promote its current exhibition of impressionist paintings, the New York Botanical Garden recently launched a site called Impressify . It features an easy-to-use tool that allows visitors to upload any photograph and, by manipulating three filters, transform it into an impressionist "painting." Funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies , the digital feature is the work of Brooklyn-based agency Madwell . "The brief was to create something that'll make people engage with the exhibit and share content—and it couldn't be hard to use," said creative director Chris Sojka. "So we thought, 'What if we could digitize impressionism in a social context, with your content?' It was the perfect thing to do." It is, certainly, a fun thing to do. Three dials allow visitors to control the focus and the thickness of the virtual brush strokes, so you can give your photos the misty feel of Monet, a blunt and heavy Van Gogh treatment, or anything in between. The feature also allows users to download the finished product as a jpeg or GIF and share it on social media. (The hashtag #GardensOnCanvas furnishes a subtle plug for the NYBG.) The landscape paintings currently on display at the garden (which has, naturally, also grown the corresponding flowers) are all by American impressionists—notably John Singer Sargent and Childe Hassam—but the gauzy, dappled style is unmistakably French feeling. One of the challenges facing Madwell's designers was how to recreate the textured, three-dimensional style of the physical paintings in a digital setting. So the designers programmed the brush strokes to undulate slightly to achieve a 3D effect. While the feature's obvious purpose is to raise awareness of the beauty of art and flowers, Sojka is well aware that many people will use Impressify on selfies and pics of their kids or pets. "It gets ridiculous," he admits.

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KitchenAid Brings Aspen’s Food & Wine Classic to Your Home

June 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you're not one of the 5,000 food fans attending this year's sold-out Food & Wine Classic in Aspen, KitchenAid is bringing the culinary world's preeminent event to you. This afternoon, the home appliance brand, which has a 30-year relationship with the annual festival, will launch "Have Dinner With Us," employing Facebook Live and other social content to enable anyone to follow along with cooking demos by headlining chefs in Aspen and to get additional information about recipes, techniques and shopping. This is the first time live video has been produced at the event, founded in 1983. Beyond Facebook, content can be found at the websites of KitchenAid and Food & Wine and via both brands' other social channels. Food & Wine and KitchenAid have a potent social following, with more than 2 million total fans on Facebook and 1.5 million via Instagram. The activation is in partnership with Chris Cosentino, winner of Top Chef Masters, a frequent guest on Iron Chef America and chef/owner of Cockscomb in San Francisco. "This is the quintessential food event in the world," Bill Beck, vp, brand marketing at KitchenAid, told Adweek at the Classic.

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Chicken With a Beef: the Untold Story of Chick-fil-A’s Cow Campaign

June 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stan Richards, founder and creative director of ad agency The Richards Group, was sitting in a routine staff meeting in 1994 when he learned his agency won the Chick-fil-A account. He didn't find out in an email. No phone call came in breaking the good news. Instead, David Salyers—then vp of national and regional marketing at Chick-fil-A—ventured from Atlanta to the agency's Dallas headquarters on a whim. Salyers arrived, unannounced, and boldly walked into the meeting. He stopped whatever conversation was taking place and shook Richards' hand. "We want you to be our new agency," he said with a smile. In that moment, Salyers made a promise to Richards that the agency said still rings true today: "We will never be your biggest client, but we will do everything we can do to be your best client." And, Richards tells Adweek, "that's exactly what they've done over all those years." The underdog chicken In the early '90s, Chick-fil-A was primarily known for being a mall-based fast-food chain, but beginning in 1994, the chain started slowly shifting its focus to freestanding units. With that shift came a new batch of competitors—big burger joints.

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5 Viacom Board Members, Including the CEO, Are Ousted in Massive Overhaul

June 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After taking weeks to line up all his pieces in his battle with Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman, Sumner Redstone has finally made his big move to regain control of his company. Today, his National Amusements, Inc., which controls Viacom and CBS Corp., announced that it had removed five members of Viacom's board of directors—including Dauman—and had elected five new independent directors. The massive board overhaul also sets the stage for Dauman's eventual dismissal as Viacom CEO. The five new directors are Kenneth Lerer (BuzzFeed chairman and former chairman and co-found of The Huffington Post), Thomas May (chairman of Eversource Energy), Judith McHale (president and CEO of Cane Investments, and former president and CEO of Discovery Communications), Ronald Nelson (Avis Budget Group's executive chairman of the board, and former co-COO of DreamWorks SKG) and Nicole Seligman (former president of Sony Entertainment). They are replacing Dauman, George Abrams, Blythe McGarvie, Frederic Salerno and William Schwartz, all of whom have been battling with 93-year-old founder and chairman emeritus Redstone over the company's future. Remaining as Viacom directors are COO and director Thomas Dooley, Cristiana Sorrell, Deborah Norville, Charles Phillips, Jr., Redstone and his daughter Shari, who is non-executive vice chair

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