Facebook Users May Soon See Multiple Products Featured in a Single News Feed Ad

November 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ahead of the holiday season, Facebook is testing a different kind of product ad that lets retailers showcase more than one item within the news feed. The two-click process seems to be focused on both brand awareness and direct response. The ads pair a main image or video along with related product images underneath and, if clicked, then bring up a second page with more products. If clicked again, the ad leads to the retailer's website where a consumer can actually buy the product. (The launch comes just weeks after Facebook-owned Instagram began letting more than a dozen retailers focus more specifically on ecommerce by tagging products in photos that then lead to a way to buy items online.) Some retailers like Michael Kors and Lowes have already begun testing the Facebook format this week. However, a Facebook spokesperson said other brands will ramp up their own campaigns later this month and through the holiday season. More could join early next year, with other industries beyond retail possibly added if retailers are pleased with results. According to Michael Kors, which has been using the format along with the rest of its fall campaign, cost per conversion has fallen by 79 percent. Instead of focusing too much on targeting a user with a single product, the goal is to give people enough items that might prompt them to shop more. The ads in some ways seem reminiscent of Google's " showcase shopping " ad format that launched for retailers this summer. Those ads, featured in Google search, aim to connect retailers with potential buyers who might be interested in a product even if their search query isn't quite exact. The formats seem to potentially point to a broader trend toward clustering retail items in a way that brings a number of product listing ads underneath a single main piece of creative. The approach gives users more ideas to consider beyond just the one image they might or might not be interested in. According to Facebook, this approach drives more visual discovery by letting retailers use as many as 50 products to target users.

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You Can Now Manage Accounts on Facebook, Instagram and Facebook Messenger Via One App

November 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Social media directors for organizations and small-to-medium-sized businesses have evidently had a hard time simultaneously managing accounts for Facebook, Instagram and Facebook Messenger. So much so, in fact, that a number of them have evidently been juggling multiple iPhones to make it all work. To help with this, Facebook is unveiling a feature today called universal inbox to handle communications for all three channels via the Facebook Pages app . "Some people have been flipping through different apps to manage their various presences," remarked Benji Shomair, global head of pages at Facebook. "And other people would actually have multiple phones open." Universal inbox will let marketers more easily take note of comments, reviews and direct messages being authored by consumers on Facebook, Instagram and Facebook Messenger. In addition, page managers can use their cursor to tap a user's profile and see his or her publicly available information, potentially giving businesses more insights on how to interact with the potential customer

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Lyft’s New Device Aims to Increase Safety and Eliminate Awkwardness With Drivers

November 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Do you even Lyft, bro? Lyft, a ride-sharing service, is shaking things up in a major way. The young company, which was launched in 2012, has already gone through a few identity iterations. The most recent one is sort of a cool-older-sibling vibe. Today, the brand announced a new part of it's in-car experience: the Amp. What looks like one of those fancy Bluetooth speakers everyone has at pool parties is actually a cool new way for drivers to communicate with riders. By day, the Amps will be the signature Lyft pink/magenta color. But when it's pulling up to a Lyft user who has ordered a ride, the display will turn green, thereby eliminating the awkward moments that plague a lot of ride-share app users. Bonus feature: if multiple people in a specific area all order a Lyft, their cars will each display a different color, as specified in their app. "We've seen three times our typical growth in the last 18 months," said Melissa Waters, Lyft's vp of marketing. "And we want to expand as we grow." Getting into someone else's car means agreeing on a shared assumption of safety.

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How This Agency Built Its Own App Using Amazon Echo

November 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Last October, New York-based digital agency Rain worked with Campbell's to find a new way to push out the CPG giant's library of recipes, creating one of the first branded "skills" for Amazon's voice-controlled Echo device, which helped consumers find dinner recipes on demand. While the agency expected a bit of a PR boost from the Campbell's work, voice and the so-called Internet of Things has actually become a big growth area for Rain over the past year, as more agencies look for ways to tap into emerging devices for brands. Shortly after creating the Campbell's skill, Rain became one of a handful of Amazon's go-to developers tasked with building "skills"—voice apps that let consumers ask questions to Amazon's AI platform named Alexa. Rain even opened up a small satellite office—albeit with one employee—in Seattle to be closer to Amazon's headquarters. "From an agency level, Amazon helps make some connections with clients," said Greg Hedges, director of strategy at Rain. "People will reach out to Amazon sometimes and then we'll get them to the right people." In the past year, Rain has signed 1-800-Flowers, P&G's Tide, Yahoo Fantasy Football and Liberty Mutual-owned Safeco as clients, helping to build branded skills that dole out information and entertainment to consumers. For Safeco, the agency built a glossary of insurance terms so that consumers can ask Alexa questions like, "What is umbrella insurance?" or "What does liability mean?" For 1-800-Flowers, users can automatically place flower orders to their friends or family members.

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Struggling Through a Workout? A Singing Clay Matthews Will Carry You to the Finish

November 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Having trouble getting through a tough workout this week? A singing Clay Matthews and Muscle Milk can help you reach the finish line. In the next extension of the brand's "Stronger Everyday" campaign, created by agency of record Mekanism, Green Bay Packers linebacker Clay Matthews appears in a series of situations where he is tasked with helping athletes performing at any level, from professional to recreational, step up their game. Oh, and he actually sings in the ads too. "From the viewers perspective you're hearing the song being sung and then visually on screen you're seeing what feels very much like an epic sports montage with a fun twist," Josh Mohr, CytoSport vp of consumer marketing for Muscle Milk, said. Matthews is meant to personify Muscle Milk in the 30-second spot and a series of 15-second ads that show the athlete helping a women kill it on the tennis court and carrying a runner on his shoulders during a race. The idea being, even when someone as athletic and strong as Clay Matthews isn't around, Muscle Milk will be there for you and get you through your training. The decision to have Matthews actually sing "Lean on Me" came from his impressive past crooning in the film Pitch Perfect 2. "The minute Clay started singing in the recording studio everybody was pretty blow away ... He was so self-deprecating about the whole thing," Tommy Means, Mekanism founder and executive creative director said. "The minute he started singing he sounded like a song bird." The "Stronger Together" campaign originally launched in April with spots starring the Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry.

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How Donald Trump’s Win Made Pollsters, Pundits and Journos All Big Losers

November 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On MSNBC's Morning Joe, just hours after the election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States, the show's co-hosts and panelists sat around a table in 30 Rock's famed Studio 8H. The home of Saturday Night Live was packed with a live audience—and yet, this was a quiet room. The conversation bounced from how Trump pulled off his historic upset to how the media missed the story of the century entirely—an analysis that would go on to dominate the conversation in the days that followed. "The media was all in on this narrative," co-host Joe Scarborough told his audience. "Everybody was marching in lockstep: Clinton is going to win, Clinton is going to win." In fact, just 24 hours earlier, the chatter on Morning Joe and most other news programs was centered around Trump's narrow path to 270 electoral votes. When Donald Trump pushed back during interviews, including two Election Day call-ins to Fox News, he insisted that journalists were missing the story, that the huge crowds at his rallies were a sign his support was larger than pollsters were predicting. Those voters, MSNBC analyst Mike Barnicle admitted the day after the election, "were ignored by pollsters, they were ignored by media, and they showed up yesterday in astounding numbers." Careful polling, analyzed by network "decision desks," played into the reporting—and networks' underlying planning for coverage of the campaign and election night. But the underlying data was flawed. Worse, suggestions that Trump could outperform his polling—or perhaps that the polling simply had the story wrong—were met with, at times, hostility. Clinton was always shown as reliably in the lead. So why did the media never seriously consider a Trump upset a very real possibility? "Many news outlets never took Trump seriously as a candidate because they covered him as a circus act ," says University of Georgia journalism professor Chris Shumway.

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GoPro Launches Its First Scripted TV Ad, Part of Its Biggest Global Campaign to Date

November 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For years, GoPro has taken a user-centric approach to its advertising, packaging submitted content for TV spots that have run everywhere from YouTube to the Super Bowl. But today, it's launching its first scripted TV spot, which is part of its largest campaign yet that's rolling out on a global scale. TV spots will run in the U.S., Spain, Germany, France, Korea, Australia and other markets. And there's an accompanying global campaign aimed at creating around 1.4 billion impressions. The campaign is a combination of regional and national ad buys, with the first spot airing today before ramping up Friday and then airing in prime time during Sunday Night Football. According to GoPro svp of marketing Bryan Johnston, the campaign is meant to reflect the diversity of the brand's users over the past few years, as its core user base grows from being adventure-seeking people documenting the great outdoors to a camera that can be used by anyone. "If we succeed, then we create thousands upon thousands upon millions of 21st-century storytellers," Johnston told Adweek

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Adobe Buys Programmatic Ad Player TubeMogul for $540 Million

November 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a deal to bolster its video offerings for advertisers, Adobe has acquired demand-side platform TubeMogul for $540 million. Programmatic-geared TubeMogul works with brands like Dannon and Quiznos to run digital, mobile and video campaigns by powering the ad-tech pipes in platforms like Facebook and Snapchat. According to Adobe, TubeMogul will get plugged into Adobe Marketing Cloud, the company's tool to help brands manage digital campaigns, primarily in display, social and search. As brands' spending on digital video continues to increase, the addition of TubeMogul will theoretically help Adobe grab bigger digital budgets. The deal is expected to close in the first quarter of 2017. "Adobe and TubeMogul will provide a unified advertising and data management solution that enables brands to precisely identify the right segments and plan, execute and measure paid media across any device," TubeMogul CEO Brett Wilson said in a statement.

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The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called. CNN did make some ratings history in prime time, as 13.3 million total viewers tuned into the network's Election Night in America coverage

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The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called.

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