7 Shocking Character Deaths on Walking Dead, and Where the Actors Went Next

October 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As fans of AMC's The Walking Dead know, the popular series has chewed its way through a rotating cast of characters who get killed off each season (this is a zombie apocalypse, after all). As the ratings behemoth gets set to return for its sixth season on Sunday, here are some of the most notable actors whose characters did not survive. It probably goes without saying, but there are big spoilers ahead for anyone who isn't caught up: Shane Walsh Played by: Jon Bernthal Who he was : The best friend and right-hand man of Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln), until the two clashed over how to lead the group of survivors. (There was also that whole issue of Walsh having an affair with Grimes' wife, Lori). How he died : As Walsh became more of a psychopath, his former best friend fatally stabbed him. The Season 2 stunner also led to one of the biggest reveals of the entire series: You don't have to be bitten by a zombie to turn into one after you die. Before appearing on The Walking Dead : Primarily a stage actor, he landed a starring role on the one-season sitcom The Class, created by Friends co-creator David Crane. Since leaving The Walking Dead : He's appeared in Hollywood hits The Wolf of Wall Street and Fury, and starred in TNT's short-lived Mob City. Next year, Bernthal will return to the comic book world when he portrays The Punisher on the second season of Netflix's Daredevil. Lori Grimes Played by: Sarah Wayne Callies Who she was : A survivor of the outbreak, Lori was the wife of Rick Grimes and mother of Carl and Judith. How she died : She died after giving birth. In a cruel twist of fate, her son Carl had to shoot her in the head to prevent her from returning as a zombie. Before appearing on The Walking Dead : She landed her first television role in 2003 as Kate O'Malley in the short-lived CBS show Queens Supreme. She also played Detective Jane Porter on The WB's Tarzan

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Buyers Love Advanced TV, Even Though They Still Aren’t Quite Sure What It Is

October 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Long live advanced TV! Wait—what is advanced TV again? Those are the somewhat contradictory findings from a new Interactive Advertising Bureau study released today called Advanced TV: Ad Buyer Perceptions. In the IAB survey of 255 marketers and agency decision makers (all of whom make media brand-selection decisions and spend at least $1 million in advertising), 78 percent said they are already using advanced TV, and most of them plan to increase their spend in the next 12 months. Yet, despite that momentum, IAB's survey, conducted by Advertiser Perceptions, also revealed confusion about what exactly "advanced TV" encompasses. Fifty-eight percent of advertisers said they were unclear about the difference between advanced TV and connected TV, while 35 percent said they didn't understand advanced TV's technical process.

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For This Brooklyn Nine-Nine Star, Social Media Is Like Smoking

October 6, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 37 Claim to fame Stars as Gina on Brooklyn Nine-Nine (Sundays, 8:30 p.m. on Fox) Base Los Angeles Twitter @chelseaperetti Adweek: How addicted are you to social media? Chelsea Peretti: I've said on record, I'm waiting for some sort of charismatic leader to take me away from technology. But until that time, I do feel pretty powerless. I did a reading vacation with my boyfriend [ Key & Peele 's Jordan Peele] where we were just going to read books. I turned my phone off in the morning, and I think I went 40 minutes before I had to turn it back on. I was like, "I need to research something!" How often are you on social media during a given day? It's probably 70 percent [of the day]. I used to smoke cigarettes; anytime you're a little bored, you step outside and have a cigarette. Social media is like that. Any time there's any feeling of lacking in your life, you pop open some Web community for fulfillment

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As Live TV Viewing Declines, How Can Networks Fully Monetize Their Viewers?

October 6, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For years, NBCUniversal's ratings guru Alan Wurtzel has been criticizing the deficiencies of Nielsen's current ratings system—he says as much as 35 percent of NBC's audience for an average episode isn't measured by Nielsen's C3 and C7 metrics, which don't include most streaming activity, particularly on mobile and tablets—and he's tired of it. "The time for just whining about this is over," said Wurtzel, NBCUniversal's president of research and media development. "We really need to get proactive." As live TV viewing continues to decline—in the first week of the new TV season, three broadcast networks suffered double-digit drops in adults 18-49 versus a year ago: Fox (20 percent), ABC (19 percent) and NBC (10 percent)—networks and buyers have intensified their pleas for a new metric to accurately measure viewing across all platforms, and their cries are finally being heard. "One of the key elements of any ability to monetize is you need measurement," said Charles Buchwalter, president and CEO of Symphony Advanced Media. "If you can't measure it, you can't sell it." Symphony is one of several companies diving into the ratings fray this fall, unveiling new multiplatform tools that they hope will allow them to edge out Nielsen as the new industry standard. Symphony's VideoPulse, a cloud-based service that captures live media usage by individuals across several platforms (including VOD, OTT, Web, mobile, gaming devices, DVR and linear TV), is currently being beta tested by major media companies like NBCUniversal and Viacom. "This market has been moving very quickly over a short period, and being able to use older methodologies to capture this new behavior is very difficult," said Buchwalter. "It very well could be that you just need new approaches to capture this." Wurtzel likes what he sees so far from VideoPulse: "It's very early days there, but it looks to me like this is the first viable alternative I've seen to measure cross-platform." But Symphony isn't the only company looking to become the next Nielsen. ComScore recently introduced Xmedia, which combines TV and digital audience metrics, and mounted an even more aggressive challenge last week by announcing plans to acquire rival Rentrak. In the deal, which is expected to close early next year, the companies will join forces and take on Nielsen for ratings measurement supremacy. However, Nielsen isn't going down without a fight in the struggle for multiplatform metrics. The company is preparing to unveil its total audience measurement, which Nielsen says will introduce "like-for-like" metrics for digital and video—including SVOD providers like Netflix, which have refused to share any ratings metrics for years—by year's end.

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Brilliant SNL Skit Pitches a Drug That Cures Republicans Who Think They Can Be President

October 5, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The 2016 Republican presidential field and pharmaceutical marketing are both topics ripe for parody—and Saturday Night Live has obliged, skewering both at the same time in this faux ad for the world's most narrowly targeted anti-dementia drug. In the bit, which aired this weekend on SNL's season premiere, Kenan Thompson pitches Abilify (which is a real antipsychotic drug) as a pill just for politicians who are deluded in thinking they might someday actually be president. Taran Killam plays Rick Santorum. Bobby Moynihan plays Mike Huckabee. And none other than Miley Cyrus, who hosted the show, plays Jim Gilmore's wife. It's a pitch-perfect sendup of the formulaic (often dissonant) commercial genre, and of the current GOP clown car. There's even a nod to Trump, who in years past would've been a strong candidate for the treatment (apparently the disease works itself out if you wait long enough for the public to lose its mind, too). All that's missing is a list of side effects.

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If He Wasn’t on Dancing With the Stars, Train Hero Would Have Been on Oregon Campus

October 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Alek Skarlatos gained fame earlier this summer when he and two other Americans overpowered a would-be terrorist on a Paris-bound train. And that notoriety might have saved his life. Skarlatos is one of the contestants on this season's Dancing With the Stars, and it was during rehearsal yesterday that he heard the news of the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Ore. "I was actually in the studio with Lindsay [Arnold], dancing, and I got a text from one of my friends telling me what had happened, so I looked it up on the Internet to confirm it and I was just in total shock," Skarlatos told ABC News. If not for his turn on the ABC competition series, Skarlatos, a native of southern Oregon, would have been on the campus.

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Hot List: What Are the Best Shows of 2015? Vote Your Picks for TV and Streaming

October 1, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Whether you stream your shows or tune in live, it's been a huge year for TV in all its forms. But what truly rose to the top? There were big network hits like Empire, highly anticipated spinoffs like Fear the Walking Dead and breakout streaming successes like Narcos. But when it comes to the Adweek Hot List Readers' Choice Awards, your picks are what matter most. Vote below as often as you'd like through Nov. 23. The winners will be revealed on Nov. 30. And your favorites are... Hottest Show of the Year Hottest Comedy Hottest Drama Hottest Reality or Competition Series Hottest Late Night Host Hottest Broadcast Network in Prime Time Hottest Network - Comedy Hottest Network - Drama Hottest Sports Network Hottest News Network Hottest Family Network Hottest Show on Social Media Hottest Kids Show Hottest Movie or Miniseries Hottest New Series Hottest Streaming Service Want to keep voting? Vote for the Digital Hot List > Vote for the Print Hot List >

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Three Takeaways from Trevor Noah’s Daily Show Debut

September 29, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

That sound you just heard was Comedy Central exhaling. The Trevor Noah era of The Daily Show kicked off Monday night, and it felt like the summer of 2013 over again. Two years ago, John Oliver filled in for host Jon Stewart, and proved the program could still be funny and innovative, even with someone else in the anchor chair: The Daily Show, ultimately, was more than just Stewart. Noah proved that again Monday night, as he smoothly assumed his new role as host, presiding over a show that stuck to the same tried-and-true format that was so hilariously successful under Stewart. Viacom pulled out all the stops for his debut, simulcasting it across all its major networks (did CMT audiences know what they were in for?). From the first moments (the opening theme) to the last ("your moment of Zen"), it was clear that The Daily Show with Trevor Noah was going to bear a striking resemblance to The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (even the pre-Stewart Craig Kilborn-hosted version had those familiar bookends)

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ESPN’s Scott Van Pelt Says He Got His Big Break by ‘Pretending to Be Arnold Palmer’

September 24, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ESPN's Scott Van Pelt explains that it's impossible to follow in his footsteps because his path to success isn't something that can be duplicated. Van Pelt was a young production assistant for the Golf Channel when he was asked to impersonate Arnold Palmer during rehearsals for a new show. Former Golf Channel executive producer Michael Whelan asked, "Who is this idiot that thinks he's Arnold Palmer?" The next thing Van Pelt knew, he was a reporter for the network. "I was no more a reporter than I was an astronaut," Van Pelt said. A friendship with Tiger Woods would propel his career even further, and it's a good thing it worked out for the current midnight SportsCenter host. "I'm not capable of doing anything else," he said. "The whole TV thing is just a gigantic happy accident. There is no recipe I can give you."

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This New Measurement Tool Shows Millennials Are Watching as Much TV as Anyone

September 22, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the new TV season kicks off with 22 new shows debuting over the next month, networks and advertisers will begin to make sense of which series are clicking with viewers and which ones will get axed. But in the current TV marketplace of fragmented viewership, networks have been complaining that Nielsen no longer provides an adequate measurement of who's really watching their shows. "We're not getting measured accurately and were losing a lot of people," said Alan Wurtzel, NBCUniversal's president of research and media development, during an industry meeting this morning. Wurtzel estimated that 15 percent to 35 percent of viewers who watch on other platforms are not getting counted. "And it's only growing," he added. VideoPulse, which was unveiled this morning, is a new TV multiplatform measurement tool from Symphony Advanced Media looking to finally crack that code. It's a cloud-based service that captures live media usage by individuals across OTT, VOD, Web, mobile, gaming devices, DVR and linear TV. Data comes from the 15,000 users who have already signed up to be tracked; Symphony hopes to have 50,000 within the next year. The data VideoPulse has already gathered goes against the idea that millennials aren't watching TV—they just aren't watching the way previous generations did. According to traditional TV measurement from Nielsen, millennial viewing has dropped 30 percent over the past five years. But VideoPulse found that 25 percent of viewing among millennials is on DVRs and over-the-top services and happens outside the Live+7 window, not measured by Nielsen. "There has been a significant void in understanding how consumers are using nontraditional media platforms, but innovation has finally arrived in the media-measurement space," said Charles Buchwalter, president and CEO of Symphony Advanced Media. Buchwalter says the product will "track the cross-media, cross-platform behavior of consumers in the fastest growing mode of TV and video viewing, allowing the market to extend beyond the current industry-accepted norm of Live viewing plus seven days ratings." The product—which is available immediately for advertisers, agencies and media companies—is already undergoing beta testing by NBC, Viacom, Warner Bros. Media Research and A+E Networks. "Our industry has been disadvantaged by legacy-measurement approaches that have failed to evolve with consumers' increasing use of media platforms," said Liz Huszarik, evp, Warner Bros. Media Research & Insights. "We are hopeful that by working with Symphony Advanced Media's VideoPulse that we can capture an accurate picture of consumers' total TV/video usage across platforms and devices with a transparency that's been missing from other vendors." VideoPulse also includes data from streaming services—most notably Netflix—which so far hasn't been divulged

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