How Food & Wine’s New Editor Is Bringing Her Own Flavor to the Brand

June 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Editor of Food & Wine Previous gig Director of inspiration for Conrad Hotels Age 45 Twitter @NilouMotamed Adweek: Food & Wine's last editor, Dana Cowin, had been with the brand for more than two decades when she stepped down earlier this year. What's it like stepping into her shoes? Nilou Motamed: Dana left the brand in great shape. I would say that there's been really a seismic shift in how editors work. Perhaps when Dana became editor, and until recently, you were more of a magazine editor. But I think that one shift as I go forward is having the entire brand under my purview and collaborating really closely with our publisher. What are you bringing to Food & Wine that's new and different? I'm of international descent—I grew up in Iran and in Paris and the U.S.—and I'm a big traveler, so that's certainly important to me. We've always done travel at Food & Wine, but I think we'll do more international travel, more food destinations through the lens of travel. Perhaps because we do so many recipes, we've spent a lot of time focusing inside of the home, but as the Food & Wine lifestyle evolves, it really transcends just being at home and cooking and becomes the lens through which you look at the world, so I want to showcase that more clearly. That means more narratives, more voices. In our September and October issues, we'll have [food writer] Francis Lam and Lauren Collins from The New Yorker. Over the past few years, Time Inc.

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Publisher Reach on Facebook Is Down 42%

June 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers who have noticed their overall reach on Facebook has dramatically declined over the past few months can at least have peace of mind that they're not alone. According to an analysis by SocialFlow, publishers on Facebook have experienced a rapid decline in overall reach during the past few months. The social analytics company examined 3,000 Facebook pages, most of which are publishers who have a collective annual impression count of around 500 billion reaching 600 million unique users. And what it found might be a bit depressing to all the hard working journalists of the world: In May, publishers produced around 550,000 posts that went through SocialFlow's platform—up from 470,000 in April—but overall reach from January to May was down 42 percent per post. That's a "pretty notable drop," said SocialFlow CEO Jim Anderson. "We said, wait a minute, if the reach is staying flat but the posts are going up, the only possible conclusion there is that my reach per post is going down," he said in an interview.

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Ad of the Day: How MTV Is Telling Millennials to Vote in This Craziest of Election Years

June 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

MTV has a crazy plan for getting young voters excited about the 2016 election cycle: Talk about the issues. This week, the network is launching "Elect This," a sweeping new campaign to drive millennials to the polls in November, and serve as a sort of energizing antidote to the personality-driven insanity of the current political landscape. An anthem spot features a hodgepodge of images capturing various hot-button topics relevant to its audience, including gun control, student debt, immigration reform, LGBT rights, the economy, health care and the war on drugs. A call-and-answer chant serves as the soundtrack, repeating the campaign's title and crescendoing to the spot's capstone, a brief clip of Leonardo DiCaprio addressing the United Nations on climate change this spring. "You are the last best hope of Earth," he says—a slick bit of editing that repurposes a message meant for international delegates as a rallying cry for the people who will inherit the planet. A second ad launches the campaign's "Infographica" series, which will visualize statistics on similar themes, like the fact that 83 percent of millennials support background checks for gun ownership. Two more spots, meanwhile, debut the campaign's "Robo-Roundtable" feature, which satirizes public conversation around particular subjects, like marijuana legalization, in short clips starring a group of animatronic pundits with computerized voices who quote chatter from Twitter in their debates. And PSA trots out the obligatory parade of celebrity supporters, from Common to Melissa McCarthy to the Gregory Brothers to Alessia Cara to Carmelo Anthony to Sasheer Zamata. Overall, it's an approach meant to energize voters age 18-35, 92 percent of whom MTV's research found agree that the 2016 election "is like a bad reality show," and 74 percent of whom are embarrassed by it, which may in fact be the only reasonable response to the current state of affairs. The network is essentially a fixture in youth politics. The new work builds on its history of advocating for political participation, most notably with the long-running "Choose or Lose" campaign, which MTV launched in 1992 and scrapped in 2011 for its "Power of 12" tagline, meant to amp up a demographic left cynical following the 2008 election. The new tack makes a fair amount of sense, given the circus-like atmosphere of the current presidential field, and MTV's research—87 percent of 18-29 year-olds agreeing that this election cycle is really important to their generation (up from 75 percent in 2012), but 69 percent of 18-34s saying they're already exhausted by it. Whether it's enough to effectively spur enthusiasm, or action, remains to be seen

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Shaquille O’Neal Goes Undercover As an Unusually Tall Lyft Driver in New Digital Spot

June 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Would you recognize Shaquille O'Neal if he was your Lyft driver? To spoof riders in Atlanta, the ride-sharing app planted a camera in the front of a car and dressed up Shaq in wigs, beards and sunglasses under names like Pierre and Goose for a day. Whether or not the 7-foot-1 star actually surprises anyone is questionable at best, but at least a few of the riders went along with the joke. After all, he does tell passengers, "You know my favorite movie? Kazaam—it's everybody's favorite movie" and that he's "the greatest free-throw coach of all time." The brand worked with production studio Alldayeveryday and director Alex Richanbach, who is also behind Funny or Die shorts like "NFL Fantasy Football Commissioners Resign" and "Dan Gilbert Apologizes to LeBron James." The YouTube spot debuted Wednesday and, in a day, has generated more than 790,000 views on YouTube and another 294,000 on Facebook. Shaq isn't the only sports star to spoof unsuspecting drivers. Danica Patrick, the Golden State Warriors and Jerry Rice have created similar spots for the ride-sharing app. Take a look below:

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3 Surprising Lessons a Major Nonprofit Learned When It Analyzed Its Advertising

June 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nonprofits rarely have the luxury of big advertising budgets, and it's not often they get a chance to analyze whether their ads are working. But a new study may help shed some light on the kinds of ads that actually help drive donations. Market research firm Millward Brown and the Ad Council recently set out to study the impact of a PSA campaign for Goodwill. The Ad Council, which relies on donated time and space from media partners, received more than $94 million in donated support for the Goodwill campaign, running from September 2013 to April 2015 and resulting in 363 million pounds of donations. The research wanted to determine whether changing the nonprofit's mix of TV, digital, print and radio advertising could increase donations, said Ellyn Fisher, svp of public relations and social media at the Ad Council. With such valuable data, Goodwill could make sure it was focusing on the right kinds of ads in future campaigns

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Amid Rumors of Layoffs, HSBC’s Top Global Marketer to Step Down After 15 Years

June 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Chris Clark, group head of marketing at banking giant HSBC, will soon be leaving the company after more than 15 years. A spokesperson told Adweek, "Chris Clark will be stepping down, but he will remain in the post until a replacement is found." Clark joined the London-based financial company (which is one of the world's largest) in 2001 as head of brand strategy after spending nine years in accounts at WPP's Saatchi & Saatchi, where he worked with such clients as Toyota, Barclays and Birds Eye. The reasons for his departure are unclear, and the company spokesperson said, "There is nothing more to add at this current moment in time." Earlier this week, Reuters and other outlets reported that HSBC would be cutting "dozens" of executive-level jobs in its investment bank unit as recently installed CEO and Goldman Sachs veteran Matthew Westerman aims to make his mark on the organization. According to a report in Business Insider , the company also let several top marketing executives go late last year, including global head of marketing for commercial banking, global banking and markets Amanda Rendle. Clark was not affected by that round of layoffs. HSBC has worked with J. Walter Thompson since 2004, when that shop won a review along with several other WPP units. In 2013, the client divided duties on its business by adding the U.K. offices of Grey and Saatchi & Saatchi to its roster, with the former handling retail promotions in Europe and Latin America and the latter working on the "premier" portions of its portfolio. In a 2012 interview with Campaign , Clark discussed his efforts to reinvent the brand, saying, "There is a lot of jousting at the top of the house which is very cold-eyed and clear-eyed. ... It is a very tough environment sometimes, and a lot of people don't fit." HSBC is among the world's top advertisers. Two years ago, its yearly worldwide marketing spend was estimated to be approximately $575 million. It is not clear at this time whether the departure of the company's top marketer will facilitate another round of reviews.

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How Brands Became the Most Powerful Advocates in Today’s Battle for LGBT Equality

June 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This spring, North Carolina and Mississippi came under fire for passing laws that many felt were discriminatory against gay, lesbian and transgender residents. In addition to being lambasted by LGBT advocates, the laws—North Carolina's House Bill 2 and Mississippi's House Bill 1523—have also been criticized by much of corporate America, with with hundreds of brands calling for their repeal and even scaling back operations in those states. When brands pressure states to embrace progressive ideals, it often results in negative economic impact for those states, as evidenced already in the travel and tourism industries in North Carolina and Mississippi. Historically, such situations can have a long-lasting economic impact for states, with the current examples likely becoming iconic case studies in brand backlash to anti-progressive social policies. The boycotts already are having an economic impact. According to Human Rights Campaign, North Carolina has lost more than half a billion dollars in economic activity from companies canceling—or reconsidering—plans to come to the state and in canceled conventions, concerts and lost tourism dollars. The Mississippi Hospitality and Restaurant Association also is reporting hotel and convention cancellations as a result of House Bill 1523. And although Target is currently facing consumer boycott threats on the heels of its declaration that transgender people could use the restroom of their choice, brands generally stand to benefit in terms of customer perception when they weigh in on these issues, experts say

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Report: Viacom Ad Sales Chief Jeff Lucas Is Headed to Snapchat

May 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Viacom's situation—in which its founder, CEO and board of directors are all engaged in a bitter legal battle over the company's future—just might have gone from bad to worse. Just a week after buyers told Adweek that the Viacom upfront will progress smoothly as long as Jeff Lucas, head of marketing and partner solutions for Viacom, remains at the helm, a New York Post report claims that Lucas will be leaving Viacom in July to become COO of Snapchat. Viacom and Snapchat said the report was inaccurate, with Viacom insisting that Lucas remains completely focused on Viacom's upfront. But both companies stopped short of issuing a full denial. In other words, Lucas could indeed be focused on the upfront for now, and then step aside for the Snapchat job later in the summer. Lucas joined the company in 2005 as svp of Comedy Central ad sales and marketing. He's risen through the ranks and was named head of sales for MTV Networks' music and entertainment groups in 2010. In March 2015, he was put in charge of the entire Viacom portfolio. Lucas has already been working closely with Snapchat. In February, Viacom began selling ads on behalf of the social network and launched global Discover channels for MTV and Comedy Central

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Tries to Lure More Americans to Canada in New Tourism Campaign

May 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

To attract more U.S. tourists, Destination Canada, the country's national tourism marketing organization, brought in the big guns: Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, whose good looks and feminist viewpoints have won him lots of American fans. (At a state dinner in March, President Obama called him "the most popular Canadian named Justin." Move over, Bieber.) Trudeau appears in the first video of Destination Canada's three-year campaign, "Connecting America," which launched this month and will include ads and social media content for the U.S. market that showcases Canadian destinations. "Our research tells us that there are 30 million Americans actively considering Canada when they're looking at online travel choices, but the perceptions are that we're cold all the time, that we're far away, and that we lack urban sophistication and culture," said David Goldstein, president and CEO of Destination Canada. "Previous campaigns have done a great job at extolling the natural virtues of Canada, but the average American consumer has a hard time of figuring out what to do and where to go." Over steak and seafood at a Montreal restaurant, Trudeau talks with Top Chef winner Kristen Kish about Canada's culinary scene, the country's unheralded wine industry, and off-the-beaten path rural and urban vacation experiences. "We boldly approached the prime minister's office to see if he would help us. It was in the wake of his first state dinner with Barack Obama, and there was a certain buzz about him," Goldstein said. "He was more than happy to pitch in, and we couldn't ask for a better spokesperson." From 2014 to 2015, the number of U.S. visitors to Canada actually rose by 8.3 percent, to 12.5 million, accounting for 70 percent of all international arrivals, according to Destination Canada. Nonetheless, the organization wants to get back to its pre-9/11 levels of 14.5 million American visitors. The goal of the new campaign, its first national tourism initiative in the U.S. since 2011, is to get U.S. travelers to book trips to Canada, Goldstein said. "Often, in destination marketing, you're hoping to get brand awareness. Brand is important, but we're not selling a destination, we're selling experiences

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Legoland’s New Campaign Is ‘Built for Kids’—Just Ask Its Pint-Size CEO

May 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Family summer vacations are in full swing, and if you're headed to Orlando, Fla., chances are that Walt Disney World or Universal Studios are the top destinations you think of. So, Legoland Florida created a hotel and theme park built for kids to stand out. This week, Legoland and VML New York are launching a new spot starring Tommy Parker—the brand's kid CEO as part of Legoland's ongoing "Built for Kids" campaign. The new ads show off all of the cool features of the hotel—like a moat made out of legos and kid-friendly restaurant menus with macaroni and cheese. "The secret to the strategy is not ... trying to compete head-to-head against [our competitors], but actually carving out our own unique space and owning that space unlike any other theme park could," said Rex Jackson, marketing and sales director of Legoland. "I kind of like to think of him as this child of Ferris Bueller and Wes Anderson [with] an imaginative view on the world and he lives in this amazing park—this would be a dream job for any child anywhere," said Mike Wente, VML's managing director and executive creative director. "There's something that's aspirational and beautiful about that but also the way that he thinks and that he borrows some adult language but put through a kid's lens." The 60-second spot is running on regional TV in Florida and includes a big social and digital push. Jackson declined to say how much the campaign costs but said that 50 to 75 percent of the brand's paid social dollars for the rest of the year will go towards the Tommy Parker campaign

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