‘The Voice’ Finalist and YouTube Star Christina Grimmie Murdered After Concert

June 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Orlando police believe a deranged fan may have been behind the brazen murder of rising music star Christina Grimmie who was a finalist on NBC's The Voice in the spring of 2014. "The suspect traveled to Orlando apparently to commit this crime and had plans to travel back to where he came from," said Orlando police chief John Mina in a Saturday morning news conference. By Saturday afternoon, police had identified the suspect as 27-year-old Kevin James Loibl of St. Petersburg, Fla. OPD can confirm 27 year old Kevin James Loibl, suspect who shot Christina Grimmie, is from St Petersburg, FL pic.twitter.com/iN6RUi3VRx — Orlando Police (@OrlandoPolice) June 11, 2016 After a performance at Orlando's Plaza Live Friday night, Grimmie was signing autographs when Loibl walked up to her and shot her. Grimmie's brother tackled the suspect, who then shot himself. Grimmie, 22, who placed in the top 3 of The Voice season 6 as part of Adam Levine's team, was a rising pop star who counts more than 3.2 million subscribers on her YouTube channel. In fact, she was discovered by the step-father of superstar Selena Gomez on YouTube 6 years ago

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How Iron Maiden Made the Boeing 747 Badass Again

June 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Celebrity endorsements are a cornerstone of advertising nowadays, but an industrial manufacturing giant like Boeing seldom gets the chance to play that game. What celebrity is going to tout stuff like cargo hold capacity and cruising range? Well, Boeing's chance came several weeks ago, when one of its 747-400 jumbo jets touched down at the company's manufacturing plant in Everett, Wash., with Captain Bruce Dickinson at the controls. Dickinson is better known as the frontman for Iron Maiden , the British heavy-metal band that's sold over 90 million records in a career spanning four decades. The 57-year-old Dickinson's talent for soaring applies to more than his voice: Since the 1990s, he's also held a commercial pilot's license. Iron Maiden is currently in the middle of a six-continent, 35-city tour in a chartered 747. And Dickinson is doing all the flying. Iron Maiden vocalist Bruce Dickenson (center, foreground) is also a commercial pilot.

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Nashville Will Move to CMT for Season 5 After ABC Gave It the Ax

June 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nashville is back from the dead. The Connie Britton and Hayden Panettiere drama, which ABC canceled last month after four seasons, is moving to CMT for Season 5. CMT will air all 22 episodes of Nashville's fifth season (which will continue to film in Nashville), while Hulu will be the show's exclusive streaming partner, making all episodes available for streaming the day after they air on CMT. Hulu already had SVOD rights to Nashville's previous four seasons. "CMT heard the fans. The wave of love and appreciation they have unleashed for Nashville has been overwhelming," said CMT president Brian Philips in a statement. "Nashville is a perfect addition to our evolving line-up of big music specials, documentaries and original series. We see our fans and ourselves in this show and we will treasure it like no other network. Nashville belongs on CMT." So far, Nashville is the only series canceled during the 2015-16 TV season to find a new home. Last season, only one canceled show moved to a new outlet: The Mindy Project, which has continued on Hulu after Fox dropped it. Lionsgate, which produces Nashville along with ABC Studios and Opry Entertainment, had been aggressively searching for a new home. In March, the studio signed Marshall Herskovitz and Ed Zwick (executive producers of My So-Called Life and thirtysomething) to step in as showrunners of a potential fifth season. Lionsgate was so confident the show would continue that it ended Season 4 with a cliffhanger, which left the fate of Hayden Panettiere's Juliette Barnes up in the air after her plane had gone missing, instead of a happier ending. "There's a little short-term pain but ultimately long-term gain because we intend and are quite focused and are in substantive and serious conversations with multiple buyers about continuing the show on another platform," Lionsgate TV chairman Kevin Beggs told The Hollywood Reporter last month. "If we didn't feel that was going to happen, we might have gone a different way." CMT was an ideal fit for the network, thanks to its country music audience and the network's decision this year to branch out into scripted series, which represents "a quantum leap" for the network, Philips told Adweek in March. The network's first scripted series, Still the King (starring Billy Ray Cyrus as a washed-up, one-hit-wonder singer who discovers he has a 15-year-old daughter), premieres Sunday night.

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Infographic: Who’s Winning the Race on YouTube, Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump?

June 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Donald Trump is usually quick to boast about how much he's winning—in politics, in business, etc., etc., etc. But now, it appears he's winning on YouTube as well, according to web analytics firm Zefr. Zefr's analysis of YouTube views for the month of May found that videos about the presumptive Republican nominee have amassed many millions more views than the combined total of Democrat rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Views of Trump-related videos increased by 42.8 percent from April to May to a total of 254 million. Meanwhile, the total 106 million views of Clinton-related videos were only up 0.68 percent from the previous month. Total views for Sanders videos fell 16.25 percent to 69.7 million. "If all publicity is indeed good publicity, then Trump has a huge advantage," said Dave Rosner, Zefr's evp of strategic marketing. However, nearly half of Trump-related views (47 percent) were for videos that expressed a negative sentiment about the candidate, while only 17 percent were positive. (The remaining 36 percent were neutral.) For Clinton, sentiment was even more negative—48 percent compared with 4 percent positive and 47 percent neutral

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Outdoor Company Yeti Celebrates Father’s Day With Emotional Video Series

June 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Many outdoor enthusiasts developed their passions for hunting or fishing by learning from their dads. Last week, Yeti, maker of coolers and other outdoor gear, launched "My Old Man," a mini-documentary series that celebrates fatherhood and its role in outdoor pursuits. The subjects in Yeti's six to eight-minute videos, which launched last week, all represent demographics within the brand's target audiences. "We wanted to connect with our core audience over their shared passions," said Sara Kenton, senior director of digital at Yeti. Over footage of hunting trips in Hawaii with his young son, pro surfer Shane Dorian talks about how he took fewer risks in surfing after becoming a father of two and discusses how he's passing his hunting techniques along to his son. Musician J.T.

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Ad of the Day: This Harrowing Anti-Abuse PSA Might Be the Most Powerful This Year

June 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Bursts of sudden, searing violence scattered among scenes of sunny but slightly askew domesticity help make "Do You See Her," a harrowing two-minute film for U.K. charity Women's Aid, one of the most memorable PSAs so far this year. "I wanted to try and show how someone suffering abuse could appear totally normal and happy in front of those closest to them," RSA Films director Paul Andrew Williams tells Adweek. "We all have the possibility of being very close to this problem without even knowing." Williams focuses on a sadly overlooked target of domestic abuse, establishing a cozy but mildly "off" atmosphere—note the vibe during the family meal—that explodes about 40 seconds into the narrative. Watch "Do You See Her" before reading further: "Older women are often invisible in many spheres of life, and it can be all too easy to not see what is really going on," says actress Tessa Peake-Jones, who portrays the grandmother.

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Google Beats Out Apple as the World’s Most Valuable Company at $229 Billion

June 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Alphabet—Google's holding company—is also the world's most valuable alpha dog. Today, Millward Brown and WPP released their annual BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands, which tracks the worth of the world's top brands. According to BrandZ, Alphabet leads the pack because of Google's growth in advertising money, growth in its cloud business and the company's constant innovations. It's the second time the company has topped BrandZ's list in the past three years, after fighting Apple for the No. 1 slot. According to BrandZ, Google's value hit $229 billion this year (up 29 percent year-over-year) while Apple's value dipped 8 percent to $228 billion. Just two weeks ago, a separate report from media buying firm Zenith Media pegged Google as the world's biggest media player, controlling $60 billion in ad spend in the U.S. alone

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Why Fast-Food and Snack-Food Brands Are Introducing Smaller Signature Offerings

June 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As consumers cut sugar and salt from their diets, fast-food and snack-food brands are fighting for survival. And part of their survival strategy is to downsize , with many brands slashing product sizes or introducing smaller versions of signature offerings. McDonald's is currently testing Mac Jr., a smaller version of the Big Mac. Coke and Pepsi's 7.5-ounce mini cans, for instance, are in line with the trend of declining U.S. soda consumption, which hit a 30-year low in March, according to Beverage Digest.

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Infographic: What Big Grocery Stores Are Doing to Keep Consumers Coming Back

June 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In the U.S., grocery store sales are a $600 billion industry. With a few key players offering essentially the same product, the industry is dominated by the brands that know how to endear themselves to consumers. In a new study released exclusively to Adweek, Boston-based consultancy C Space homed in on consumer loyalty among the big players, attempting to flesh out some insights about what makes shoppers come back. "The grocery industry is an increasingly crowded space, and every new innovation brings consumers more choices. This data proves that, rather than relying on short-term tactics like discounts and reward programs, building loyalty depends on a grocery retailer's capacity to intuitively "get" its customers," said Charles Trevail, CEO of C Space. "The ones that are positioned for long-term growth are those retailers that are partnering with and drawing inspiration from their customers, delivering products and experiences that align and evolve with their values and priorities." Carlos Monteiro This story first appeared in the June 6, 2016 issue of Adweek magazine.

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How Hearst Turned an 8-Year-Old Recipe Website Into a Social Video Heavyweight

June 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Unicorn Bark. Breakfast Ramen. Boozy Skittles Slushies. While these might sound like the culinary fantasies of a stoned college student, they're actually the titles of short-form recipe videos created by Hearst-owned food site Delish. And each one has more than 10 million Facebook views apiece. Over the past year, Delish—as well as sites like BuzzFeed's Tasty, which debuted last summer and now averages more than 1.5 billion video views per month, mostly through Facebook—has managed to blow up social media feeds by ditching the serious culinary attitude and instead taking a refreshingly nonfoodie approach to food. Although most of Delish's 5.1 million 20- and 30-something social media followers have only recently been introduced to the brand, Delish.com has actually existed since 2008 when it was launched as a joint venture between Hearst and MSN. Conceived as a recipe database, it mainly targeted an older, midmarket audience looking for easy dinner solutions. But by 2015, with MSN having ended its involvement and traffic steadily declining, Delish was in desperate need of an overhaul. Rather than try to revamp Delish's current recipe-based platform, Hearst Digital president Troy Young decided to rebuild from the ground up and brought in Food Network Magazine executive editor Joanna Saltz to lead the charge as site director. Their first order of business was trying to figure out exactly what Delish should be. At the time, recalled Young, "we struggled with the fact that the recipe space seemed like it was so done and so commoditized, and the only player that mattered was Google." Added Saltz: "We felt the food universe was shifting away from 'cups and teaspoons' to general inspiration." Meanwhile, Young noticed that on Hearst sites such as Cosmopolitan.com, readers were flocking to content about companies like Starbucks and Chipotle . "We saw that young people were really passionate about these brands that related to food but weren't about preparing food," he said. "We realized there was an opportunity to talk about food without being a recipe site." In March 2015, Delish relaunched as a millennial-focused website combining food news (think Starbucks' latest Frappuccino release) and cooking hacks (like how to hull a strawberry with a drinking straw) along with easy recipe ideas. But it was when Saltz's team began experimenting with short, snackable how-to videos early last fall that things really took off. On Facebook, super-shareable recipe videos that capitalized on millennial nostalgia—whether for favorite childhood foods (Tater Tot Grilled Cheese, Dunkaroos No-Churn Ice Cream) or cultural touchstones (Harry Potter-inspired boozy butterbeer, Bruce Bogtrotter Chocolate Cake from Matilda)—gained millions of views. Clocking in at under a minute each, they were more about having fun with food than actually offering instruction. "It's quite possible that you will never make it," Saltz admitted, "but the idea that you're so surprised and delighted by it that you want to show your friends." As its audience took off, Delish also began introducing more videos featuring ideas for quick weeknight meals that proved just as—and sometimes even more—popular.

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