5 Other Times Twin Peaks Came Back

October 6, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Your Monday afternoon comes with some good news ... and some damn good cherry pie. David Lynch's seminal television series Twin Peaks is returning to television in early 2016 on Showtime in limited series format. Lynch will direct all nine episodes, and he and series co-creator Mark Frost will write them. It's a return to his roots for Lynch, who in the last few years has done pretty much anything except make another movie; the director shot 2006's Inland Empire entirely on videotape. The announcement of the Showtime project came this morning, and there's a fun, creepy promo to go with it. Mind you, this isn't the first we've seen of the characters in the series since the show's departure from the airwaves in 1991 when it didn't so much get canceled as melt. The show's mark on culture has been indelible, and there have been no shortage of eager directors, brands and even movie distributors offering Lynch the opportunity to bring the characters back. And here are five: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me—1992 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me follows Laura Palmer through her last seven days alive and brings back the show's bizarre, hugely influential aesthetic in all its backward-talking, non-sequitur-spouting glory. It also makes it a little clearer what exactly happened to Kyle McLachlan's character at the end of the show, which is a lot to recommend it; just maybe not enough to make it a successful feature film. The movie premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 1992 where it was booed. It also didn't do very well domestically at the box office. Total gross was $4.8 million—and its competition was Pet Semetary Two and Honeymoon in Vegas—probably because you had to watch the show to know what on earth was going on. Still, if you had watched the show, you learned a lot you'd always wondered about. Georgia Coffee Ads—1993 In 1993, post-Peaks and post-Fire Walk With Me, Lynch returned to advertising briefly to make a series of Japanese coffee ads for Georgia coffee. They riff on the show's imagery and surrealism, star MacLachlan and pay tribute to the ads' viewership, who are also the only people in the world who seem to have liked Fire Walk With Me when it came out (the movie did disproportionately well in Japan). The Log Lady Explains—1993 When Bravo bought the off-network rights to rerun Twin Peaks in 1993, Lynch figured things needed a little more thorough explanation.

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What Do Millennials Really Want?

October 6, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

What do

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Reading Rainbow Host LeVar Burton Binge-Watched Game of Thrones Before He Read the Books

October 6, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who LeVar Burton Age 57 Claim to fame Emmy-winning actor (Roots, Star Trek: The Next Generation); host and producer of Reading Rainbow ; author of the children’s book The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm (available Oct. 7) Base Los Angeles Twitter @levarburton What’s the first information you consume in the morning? My email, followed by my Twitter feed, followed by the Today show. Twitter is where I get the majority of my news. What other social platforms are you on? I have a Facebook account which enables me to keep up with friends and family, but I’m much more of a voyeur there. I don’t do a whole lot of posting. It really just gives me an opportunity to stay current with what the family’s doing. I was an early adopter on Twitter, and it’s like a relationship. You have to invest in it, you know

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Primetime Broadcast Ratings Tumble, Even During Premiere Week

October 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Broadcast networks should start putting up a sign: "Watch for falling ratings." Fragmentation—the process of viewers diffusing across cable channels that cater to specific interests, as opposed to being forced to watch All in the Family en masse because it's the only thing on—has been happening for a long time, and the drop-off from DVR happened several years ago. That means there's no real excuse for the continued bleeding on broadcast TV. But there are a few factors to consider, including A) a big chunk of viewers can't get broadcast without cable subscriptions, and cable subs are falling, and B) content is either targeting people who are aging out of what ad salespeople consider the Dollar Demo (18- to 49-year-olds), or for young people joining the demo who simply don't like it. This is not a "There's Nothing Good on Broadcast" article. There's lots of good material on broadcast, including new stuff such as The Flash, Gracepoint, Stalker, Constantine and Black-ish. But when a show hits, which is not often, it hits softer than it did even last year. It is a "Ratings Are Falling Overall" article, even if individual actors—CBS, to get specific—are seeing bumps over last year's performance. So here are the across-the-board averages in the 18 to 49 demo for Premiere Week: NBC—3.0 vs. a 3.1 in 2013 CBS—2.4 vs. a 2.2 in 2013 ABC—2.2 vs.

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Larry King Has Done Over 60,000 Interviews, but This Is the One He Really Wants

October 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Larry King's career stretches back nearly six decades, ranging from his early days as a radio broadcaster in Florida to 25 years at the helm of Larry King Live on CNN. He interviewed a staggering 60,000 people before retiring in 2010. But that retirement would be short lived.

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NFL Tops Jeter’s Last Game in Twitter TV Ratings

September 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC’s Sunday Night Football contest between the New Orleans Saints and Dallas Cowboys came out on top of Nielsen’s TV Twitter ratings for sports programs this past week. The game was dominated by Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo, who threw three touchdowns despite coming off back surgery. Running back DeMarco Murray also contributed to the balanced attack with another 100-yard game, which the Cowboys won 38-17. The game attracted almost a million tweets, which reached a unique audience of 6.2 million Twitter accounts. The victory was summed up by this tweet: In case you wondered what 3-1 feels like, THIS... pic.twitter.com/ZfwPzL7LJH — Dallas Cowboys (@dallascowboys) Sept. 29, 2014 Romo also praised his team’s running game. Romo: "We're going to be tough to deal with because of our ability to run the football." #NOvsDAL — Dallas Cowboys (@dallascowboys) Sept. 29, 2014 TBS came in second with its broadcast of the Yankees-Red Sox game, which featured Derek Jeter’s final base hit before his retirement. The game produced 304,000 tweets to a unique audience of around 6 million Twitter accounts. The tweets said it all about Jeter’s stellar career in pinstripes. Derek Jeter had an outstanding career. He left it ALL on the field: http://t.co/c78zgCu0UQ #FarewellCaptain pic.twitter.com/dYGSk6DeMT — New York Yankees (@Yankees) Sept. 29, 2014 They also featured a lighting tribute from the Empire State Building.

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Shonda Rhimes Smashes It in TV Twitter Ratings

September 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Shonda Rhimes is on a roll in Nielsen’s TV Twitter ratings. The producer and screenwriter’s steamy Scandal, set in Washington D.C., generated the most Twitter traffic last week. It inspired 718,000 discrete tweets reaching 4.16 million Twitter accounts, numbers that smashed the competition. The Season 4 premiere episode on ABC featured commentary about Olivia’s Zanzabarian trysts, changes in hair style and some body language observations from Twitter fans of the series. Omg when Olivia and Fitz walked right past each other I got chills all through my body!! Ahhhh #catchingup #scandal — C•dee•C (@EyezLouisVBrown) Sept. 29, 2014 And there was some wry political commentary. Turns out "The Dog ate Obamas intelligence briefings" #Scandal — toni smith (@palmaceiahome1) Sept. 29, 2014 Rhimes’ Thursday night winning streak also featured a TV ratings win with the debut of her latest show, How to Get Away With Murder, a legal drama that pulled in 14 million viewers among adults. The show stars Viola Davis as a take-no-prisoners defense attorney. NBC’s The Voice came in a distant second in Nielsen’s TV Twitter ratings.

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The 5 Artiest Simpsons Couch Gags

September 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

All hail the dark lord of the twin moons! How quickly we forget what an art school nerd Matt Groening is. Every so often, producers of The Simpsons get one of their stranger pals to offer a unique spin on the characters to open an episode, and invariably, those ideas are as good as or better than the episode itself. Groening's high-art bonafides are real—he and illustrator

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As Genre Shows Go Mainstream, TV Execs Are Looking to Novelists for the Next Hit

September 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

TV network options on books have exploded. Publishers Lunch, a trade that tracks book industry deals, lists an ever-increasing number of television options over the last few years, with 2013 setting the record and this year looking good. And with massive success stories like Game of Thrones ruling the roost on cable , a disproportionate number of those books are genre fiction. Bill McGoldrick, head of programming for NBCUniversal’s Syfy network, says part of the appeal is the charge a reader gets from a good book with a thoroughly thought-out world. It captures your imagination, even if you’re using that imagination to figure out what your programming slate is going to look like. “The imagination behind the intellectual property, when you’re a producer or a writer or somebody sitting in my chair, fills out the world for you in a way that the script can’t,” he said. “You get behind the curtain in a way the script doesn’t allow you to do.” McGoldrick is overseeing his network’s adaptation of The Magicians trilogy , a fantasy cycle by Time book critic and tech writer Lev Grossman that reads a little like Bright Lights, Big City meets The Chronicles of Narnia. Everybody’s looking for “the next Game of Thrones,” as you’ll hear often from execs

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GoPro and the NHL Have Signed a Deal That Will Give Hockey Fans a Player’s POV

September 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ever wonder what’s it like to be Patrick Kane of the Chicago Blackhawks streaking in on a breakaway? Or New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist blocking a 100 mph shot? The NHL has struck a content-sharing deal with GoPro cameras to offer TV viewers exactly that kind of player point of view this season. The NHL will use GoPro’s POV footage in promo campaigns for the new season starting Oct. 8. The league’s two national TV partners—NBC Sports in the U.S. and Rogers in Canada—will also weave clips into game telecasts to illustrate the shooting, stickhandling and skating skills of NHL stars, said Bob Chesterman, NHL’s svp of programming. During the recent NHL/NHLPA Player Media Tour, GoPro techs outfitted nearly a dozen top stars with mini-cameras on their helmets, masks and jerseys at Newark’s Prudential Center. If a player filmed by GoPro scores this season, NBC or Rogers can illustrate what they saw on the play by cutting to taped footage from the commercial shoot, said Brian Jennings, NHL’s CMO. The league will also feature the POV content on NHL Network and NHL.com, while GoPro will use it on its YouTube channel. The GoPro mini-cameras capture images that were “unimaginable” before, said Jennings. “The [technology] demystifies our game—and truly shows what skill our players have,” he said. GoPro cut its teeth on action sports such as surfing. But it’s expanding with pro sports leagues such as the NHL and NFL, said Wil Tidman, GoPro’s head of production. Lundqvist, who led the Rangers to the Stanley Cup Finals, can’t wait to see the footage himself. “It can definitely help the game become even more interesting for the viewer, no question.”

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