Orange Is the New Black Star Reveals Her Favorite ‘Guilty Pleasure’ TV Shows

April 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 26 Claim to fame Stars as Taystee on Netflix's Orange Is the New Black; currently appearing as Sofia in The Color Purple on Broadway Base New York Twitter @thedanieb Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Danielle Brooks: Most of the time, it's Twitter. It's an easy way to get the news and know what's going on in the world. There's also this newsletter called theSkimm that I read. I love it because their headlines are so up to date with my generation [laughs], and it talks about really complicated subjects but in terms that I understand. And then after that, I'll hit Instagram. Who do you follow on Instagram? I love following plus-size models like Precious Lee , Ashley Graham and Tess Holliday . I also follow a lot of pages about fitness or detoxing and healthy eating because that's kind of where I am right now with spring, summer coming [laughs]. I follow all my girls from Orange. And I love BeBeautifulLA , who posts beautiful pictures of black women showing off stretch marks or wearing full African garb or naked, but done tastefully. She also posts beautiful poems about loving yourself and your body.

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How the NBA’s TV Partners Have Cashed In On the Warriors’ Historic Season

April 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It seemed like an easy call for ESPN. Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant playing in the final game of his storied 20-year career in front of the only fan base he's ever called home. "That was a no-brainer to grab and put into our schedule right from the beginning," said Julie Sobieski, vp of programming for ESPN. But the Golden State Warriors had other ideas. The darlings of the NBA decided to follow up their first title in 40 years by taking a run at the single-season record for most wins. The potentially record-breaking game will be played Wednesday night in Oakland, just as Kobe takes the court in L.A. So ESPN decided to call an audible, putting the Warriors' attempt at win No. 73 on ESPN and bumping Bryant to ESPN2. Ever since the Warriors began the season with a 24-game winning streak, it appeared the team would make a serious run at breaking the Chicago Bulls' 20-year record

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In $8.8 Billion Deal, CBS and Turner Add 8 More Years of March Madness

April 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS has aired the NCAA Tournament since 1982 , and today, along with Turner, it just ensured its partnership with the NCAA will reach beyond a fifth decade. CBS and Turner have extended their rights deal that covers television and digital for March Madness through 2032, adding eight years to the current pact, which was to expire in 2024. The new $8.8 billion deal allows for coverage of every game across any CBS and Turner platform, even those that haven't been created yet. Altogether, CBS and Turner have committed nearly $20 billion to the NCAA. "The NCAA Men's Basketball Championship has been a cornerstone of CBS Sports for more than three decades, and we are very pleased to extend our successful partnership with the NCAA and Turner under the same terms that have worked so well for us these past several years," said CBS Sports Chairman Sean McManus. Under the new agreement, all opening-, first- and second-round games will continue to be shown across CBS, TBS, TNT and truTV, with Turner and CBS splitting coverage of the regional semi-finals and regional finals each year. Live coverage of the Final Four semi-finals and National Championship will continue to alternate between CBS and Turner each year; Turner aired the National Championship for the first time this month . Turner and CBS Sports will maintain the existing sales partnership surrounding the NCAA Corporate Champion and Partner program, which has grown from nine to 17 members since the previous deal was announced in 2010.

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This Media Network Is Taking Its Storytelling Directly to Advertisers

April 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As a young man, digital media executive JuanMa Rowland suffered a debilitating head injury. Though he didn't know it at the time, that traumatic event opened up a world of opportunity. It allowed him to recognize patterns and, he says, tell stories with more precision. Now fully recovered, Rowland, as Azteca's StoryMaker—that's his job title—is turning adversity into advertising. Through the Azteca GlassWorks content studio, Rowland and his team of 10 creators and futurists will "tell very local, very direct stories that brands want to talk about. ... It's a completely different approach of how the upfronts work," Rowland said.

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Millennials Couldn’t Resist Streaming These 10 TV Shows This Winter

April 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Never fear advertisers, getting your brand in front of a millennial TV viewer may not be that challenging after all. Millennials still watch a majority of TV live: 4 hours and 27 minutes every day in Q4 2015, according to Nielsen's Total Audience Report, released March 24. While that's 20 minutes less than two years earlier, and while streaming on a smartphone has grown 31 minutes (from 41 minutes a day in 2013 to 1 hour 12 minutes each day in 2015), most of the top 10 streamed shows these days are on ad-supported networks. "It's not all that surprising to us," said Andre Swanston, CEO of Tru Optik, which tracks streamed TV programs. "The shows that perform best on [over the top] often tend to be the 'best' based on critic and viewer reviews, and quality content can come from different sources." Tru Optik, which measures viewership directly from commercial OTT networks, found that while serial dramas perform well with millennial streamers, episodic dramas don't. "The NCIS franchise is among the most watched shows on linear TV, but none of those titles make the Millennial OTT Top 25," Swanston pointed out. Other shows that tend to be left behind are reality programs and news magazines. Four of the top 5 most-streamed shows so far in 2016 are also in the top 5 for the full year of 2015. Owing to the big buzz it received for its summer debut on USA, Mr. Robot, which is No. 3 on the 2016 list, was No. 12 for all of 2015. Other shows that didn't make the cut in 2016 but were in the top 10 for all of 2015 include The Big Bang Theory, Better Call Saul, Empire, Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and Narcos. Many of the Top 10 so far this year, including Limitless, Fargo, Supergirl and Heroes Reborn, made their network TV debuts in the fall.

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‘MADtv’ Is Coming Back to Television, but Not in Late Night and Not on Fox

April 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While Fox is making its own late-night sketch comedy play, its former late-night staple, MADtv, is being revived by another broadcast network. The CW, which aired Madtv's 20th anniversary reunion special in January and averaged 1.7 million viewers, said Monday it will bring back the show for eight one-hour prime-time episodes. Each episode will be hosted by one of the show's original cast members. All 14 seasons of the Fox version of the show can be found on CW Seed, The CW's digital network. (MADtv is produced by Telepictures, which is owned by Warner Bros., a co-owner of The CW.) "The MADtv franchise is as vibrant as ever thanks largely to social and digital media appealing to a fan base numbering in the millions that relates to the show's brand of authentic and irreverent cross-cultural comedy," said executive producer and showrunner David E. Salzman. "We will continue to present the hard-hitting, laugh-out-loud, wall-to-wall pop culture parody our fans expect but in a fresh, new way." Where exactly The CW will schedule MADtv remains unclear. Last month, the network renewed all 11 of its series for next season. It's the second time The CW has used its corporate connections with Warner Bros. to revive a classic comedy from another network. In 2013, it brought back improv series Whose Line is It Anyway? The fourth season of that show premieres May 23. From 1995-2009, Fox aired MADtv at 11 p.m. ET on Saturday nights. The network only recently returned to late-night sketch comedy with Party Over Here, a half-hour series produced by Lonely Island, led by former SNL cast member Andy Samberg and writer Jorma Taccone.

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How 4 Multichannel Networks Plan to Attract Millennial Viewers

April 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

By now, it's a given that millennials—some of them having cut the cord, others never having had a cord to cut—are consuming an unprecedented crush of video content on a growing array of platforms and devices. And while appointment viewing is largely a thing of the past, it is also accepted that the bond that audiences, notably younger ones, have forged with content creators found on YouTube, Vine, Instagram and beyond is infinitely more unbreakable than their parents' affinity for the likes of, say, Jerry Seinfeld or the cast of Melrose Place or any other TV star from the past you'd care to name. Multichannel networks, built on the power and reach of YouTube and serving as a bridge between creators and brands craving to reach this base of young, hard-core fans, now constitute a 5-year-old ecosystem, one that finds itself all grown-up and yet as always remains in search of the latest, greatest ways to produce and distribute high-quality content—and of course, the next big video star. And their appeal goes way beyond the screen. Take Twaimz , one of the creators for network Fullscreen. Not only do his videos log millions of views, but his recent tour of the U.S. sold out 22 dates, says Fullscreen founder and CEO George Strompolos. "Why is this happening?" he asks. "He has caught the hearts and minds of an audience." On the eve of the annual Digital Content NewFronts where the freshest programming ideas will get pitched and some $3 billion in ad business will be up for grabs, Adweek caught up with Strompolos and top executives from Maker Studios , Defy Media and Studio71 (formerly Collective Digital Studio) to learn about the issues they face as they chase coveted millennial consumers and talent, and all those advertiser dollars. What would you say is the biggest issue you face heading into the NewFronts? George Strompolos: [Millennials] are watching less and less TV every year, but that doesn't mean that they're not consuming entertainment. If you're an advertiser that's used to spending all this money to reach customers and sell products, you're kind of scratching your head and saying, "Where do I belong?" It's our job to translate that and make it easier for a marketer to reach a customer in those new ways

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Mashable Staffers Laid Off as Site Pushes Further Into Video

April 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A week after finding a TV partner in its hastened push into video, Mashable.com is laying off several editorial staffers. "We are certain this is the right direction for Mashable. But that doesn't make it any less difficult to say goodbye to our friends and teammates," writes Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore in a memo posted on LinkedIn. Chief content officer Jim Roberts and CRO Seth Rogin are among those leaving the company. Both joined Mashable from The New York Times in 2013. "Jim has been instrumental in building Mashable into a truly global media brand," wrote Cashmore. "He has built an editorial team that stands for trust, credibility and accuracy, allowing us to compete with some of the world's most established media companies." Rogin, meanwhile, will move to a "new venture," Cashmore writes. I've worked with some amazing digital journalists in my 2 1/2 years at Mashable. You know who you are. Thanks for making it such a gas. — Jim Roberts (@nycjim) April 7, 2016 The site will scrap coverage of world news and politics, laying off the entire politics team, and will instead focus on technology, web culture, science, social media, entertainment, business and lifestyle

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FX CEO Says ‘Human Curation’ Is Still More Important Than Data

April 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just a month into upfront season, and the buzz around data has already become deafening. But at least one company, FX Networks, is making the case to advertisers that their upfront buys should be based on more than just audience targeting. "I think something's really getting missed in the focus on data, which is the quality of attention," FX Networks CEO John Landgraf told Adweek. "It doesn't really matter how well you can target people. You need to give them something valuable enough to really command their attention, and not only the attention to engage with your content but the advertising associated with that content." Landgraf said FX's slate—which includes shows like American Horror Story, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story and Fargo—has value to advertisers that is "vast orders of magnitude greater than anything you can get from somebody watching 30 seconds or a minute of amateur content [online]." The CEO argued that getting a consumer to engage with a show for 30 minutes, the average time spent viewing FX's digital programming, "is way more valuable than associating a commercial with a short, disposable clip which the viewer will not remember five minutes after she sees it [on Facebook or YouTube]." "Year after year, we work really, really hard to try to make things of extraordinary value to the audience on the theory—and I think it's a valid theory—that it creates extraordinary value for advertisers," Landgraf said. "So you can have all the sophisticated data and targeting in the world, and you can put an ad in front of a specific viewer. But if you don't provide them with a piece of content they love, you can't get them to watch the commercial." It was a point the network drove home last week when it kicked off its annual upfront bowling party (now in its seventh year) at New York's Lucky Strike Manhattan by screening the riveting finale of The People v. O.J. Simpson, which airs tonight

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Ratings Plummet for NCAA Championship After Its Move to Cable

April 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

At the beginning of the 2016 NCAA Tournament, Turner Broadcasting president David Levy claimed the difference between broadcast and cable "is almost non existent anymore." However, despite a National Championship game that will go down as a classic—Villanova defeated North Carolina on Kris Jenkins' three-pointer as the clock expired—the NCAA title game averaged 10 million fewer viewers than last year. This was also the first year the title game aired on cable TV. Monday night's game averaged 17.8 million across TBS, TNT and truTV, down 37 percent from the 28.3 million that watched Duke beat Wisconsin last April on CBS. In terms of household rating—the metric by which sports ad sales are sold— Monday's game notched a 13.2, down 38 percent. It was the lowest-rated National Championship game ever. From now until the end of the rights deal—through 2024—CBS and TBS will alternate airing the Championships and Final Four. But attributing the steep drop to moving the game from broadcast to cable only tells part of the story. Cable networks, even those with wide carriage like TBS, still have a far smaller reach compared to their broadcast counterparts. But they can still draw a crowd.

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