Marketers Are Getting the Snapchat Targeting Data They Want. Will That Scare Off Users?

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Having wowed advertisers at the Cannes Lions in June with the unveiling of its long-awaited ad tech platform, Snapchat has shown no signs of slowing down. The popular messaging app plans to attract deep-pocketed marketers and investors with the introduction of in-app behavioral targeting in the fourth quarter timed to a rumored IPO. To improve ad targeting, the popular messaging app last week announced Snap Audience Match, which lets brands take their email lists and files of mobile device IDs, and then anonymously sync the data with Snapchat's user pool. The company also will let a brand target viewers based on what content categories they follow. A Fortune 500 marketer, who requested anonymity, said talks are underway with Snapchat to launch pilot programs around the ad-targeting initiative.

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Why So Many Legacy Fast-Food Restaurants Are Getting Makeovers

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When it comes to dining, no matter the cost of the meal, millennials place a premium on overall experience and that includes comfortable, well-appointed spaces, say marketing analysts. Having seen the steady rise of fast-casual competitors like Shake Shack and Panera Bread , legacy fast-food chains like KFC, Arby's and Taco Bell now are busy sprucing up their decor. "Good design is no longer reserved for high-end experiences," said Susan Cantor, CEO of Red Peak Branding. Consumers care that they're in a pleasant, well-designed, clean and beautiful environment. When it comes to fast food, reliable food and quick service are no longer enough to satisfy millennials, said Lori Gross, executive director of strategy and growth at Landor. "It's about curating the whole look, tone and feel: all the touch points that will capture the consumer," she said. KFC's first redesigned restaurant opened in October 2014, and it featured red and white pinstripes, an ode to KFC's bucket from the 1970s, on both the exterior and interior, with a large rendering of Colonel Sanders prominently featured on the front of the building. The chain has redesigned 100 restaurants so far, and it plans to redesign 70 percent of its U.S. restaurants in the next three years. "We want to recommit to our roots and engage consumers through our interior and exterior design," explained Brian Cahoe, chief development officer at KFC .

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OMD’s Digital Head Wants to Foster Cooperation Between Media and Creative Partners

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig OMD, chief digital and innovation officer Previous gig Meredith Xcelerated Marketing, chief innovation officer, general manager Twitter @dougs_digs Age 41 Adweek: You've been OMD 's chief digital and innovation officer for about three months. What's that role like? Doug Rozen: On the digital side, it's really about ensuring that all clients, as well as ourselves internally, are delivering against the fullest and widest array of digital possibilities. For me, what this comes down to is that digital today is not any particular thing or any specific channel—it really stretches across all [channels] and is about rising above talking about TV, print, radio, desktop, etcetera, as channels, and start talking more about formats like audio, video, visual and how then digital allows those formats to be addressable. Now coupled with that is the innovation side, and innovation is not just big media breakthroughs—although they are awesome and necessary—to me it's about every client [having] an innovation agenda. What do you mean by that

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Can Michael J. Fox Help This New Insurance Company Thrive With a Focus on Optimism?

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Do you view insurance companies as soulless corporate monoliths powered by greed and shamefully disconnected from the customers they serve? Yeah, that's what a lot of us believe. And Sonnet, an online insurer launching today in Canada, aims to dispel such notions by flogging optimism in ads created by Johannes Leonardo. Speaking of launches, the spot below presents a mission control/blast-off scenario, with shots of earnest flight controllers and a rather unusual rocket rocket rising from the pad, punctuated by a Michael J. Fox voiceover that begins, "It took us to the stars. Overcame countless obstacles. It wasn't a single bright mind. Or money

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Rauxa’s First CMO Shares Why She Left a Holding Company for an Indie Agency

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Rauxa, the California-based agency that is the largest such organization in this country currently owned by a woman, hired agency veteran and entrepreneur Laurel Rossi to serve as its chief marketing officer in New York. She is the first person to hold that position at the agency, which currently employs more than 200 across six U.S. offices. In the new role, Rossi will work to help Rauxa develop its consulting, experiential and social media services while also expanding its Los Angeles production unit, Cats on the Roof, and furthering its commitment to developing an inclusive approach to talent recruitment and retention efforts. "We're resolute in our commitment to growing our digital offerings, to advancing diversity in our industry, and to tapping data first and foremost to drive our work every day," says Rauxa CEO Gina Alshuler in a statement. "What we saw in Laurel is a true industry leader who can adeptly bring these pieces, and more, together for us in order to build our brand and our solutions as we pursue the next wave of growth." Before joining Rauxa, Rossi co-founded New York-based boutique agency Strategy Farm, which launched in 2008. Havas acquired the company in early 2011 for an undisclosed sum after several months of negotiations, and Rossi went on to serve as president of the resulting Havas Strat Farm organization as well as healthcare unit Havas Life & Wellness. When asked why she chose to move from a holding company to a far smaller independent agency, Rossi cited Rauxa's marketing technology work, its "devotion to good creative" and its diverse leadership. "Diversity is a passion point for me," she says, "and Rauxa is devoted to it. This goes well beyond what everyone is talking about in the marketplace. My bugaboo is a lot of platitudes but not enough action." Specifically, Rossi notes Rauxa's "aggressive, progressive culture" while noting that 75 percent of its C-suite leadership team is female: "I see my job as CMO to make sure that culture is pervasive and that clients know about it, too." Rossi tells Adweek that efforts to make the agency more inclusive go beyond race and gender. "We often have a very narrow definition of diversity," she says, citing her work on a project called Creative Spirit that began in Australia and aims to get companies in creative fields like advertising, film, architecture and music production to hire individuals with physical or intellectual disabilities such as those on the Asperger Syndrome spectrum. Rossi says she has been working on the Australian project for two years, that she plans to bring a similar effort to the states soon, and that Rauxa will ask certain partner organizations to agree to "hire someone of a different ability" as part of the larger initiative. She says the flexibility of the independent agency model also played into her decision to leave Havas. "Independence gets you a lot of things [like] an uninhibited ability to see what the client needs and deliver it and the ability to make decisions on how to invest in clients' businesses without a lot of handcuffs," she says. "This lets us experiment with clients, which is what they're asking for." In July, Rauxa hired Kate Daggett , veteran of agencies like Tenthwave and TBWAChiatDay, as its first-ever chief creative officer. Rossi sees Daggett's hire as an opportunity to renew the agency's focus on creative work as it attempts to build a larger, more visible profile within the industry. "It is a rare opportunity that you find an organization with the entrepreneurial culture of a startup, the innovation of the best tech firms, and the consistent endorsement of its blue-chip clients—all in one package," says Rossi.

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FX Will Show America’s Uncomfortable Truths in Its People v. O.J. Followup About Hurricane Katrina

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story has been more successful than even FX could have imagined. The miniseries won nine Emmys in all Sunday night, including outstanding limited series, and was watched by an average of 12.6 million people across all platforms. Now FX is shifting its focus to the second season of American Crime Story, which will focus on Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. The decision raised eyebrows when it was first revealed in January, given that the topic would seem to be less palatable to audiences than People v. O.J. was. Yet the network has never wavered in its Katrina plans, says FX Networks CEO John Landgraf, who noted that a 10-episode miniseries focusing on the Simpson trial was met with just as much initial skepticism as Katrina was. Katrina "was our only choice from the very beginning," said Landgraf. "If we're all honest—and I'll be honest on my behalf—when we heard they're going to make something based on The People v. O.J. Simpson, it was like, 'Really? Do we really need that?' Because essentially on its face, what we had is cheesy, self-serving, profit-seeking, poor narrative built around that story. The reason we wanted to do it was that we could see from Jeff Toobin's book and from [Scott] Alexander and [Larry] Karaszewski's scripts and through our producers, that actually it was something much richer and more humane and deeper." Then, after People v.

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The People v. O.J. Simpson, Game of Thrones Dominate 2016 Emmys

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the night before the 2016-17 TV season began, the television industry honored its very best shows and actors at the 68th Emmy Awards—and the broadcast networks once again found themselves dominated by cable and streaming networks. For three hours on ABC, a series of broadcast stars strode onstage at the Microsoft Theater, and more often than not, presented Emmys to HBO's Game of Thrones, FX's The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, and Amazon's Transparent. Of 27 Emmy awards, just four went to broadcast outlets: Kate McKinnon won for supporting actress in a comedy (NBC's Saturday Night Live), NBC's The Voice was named best reality competition program, Regina King won for supporting actress in a limited series (ABC's American Crime) and Fox's Grease: Live was honored for directing in a variety special. HBO and FX dominated the evening, with 6 Emmys apiece, led by Game of Thrones and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. Netflix and Amazon were also well represented (with 3 and 2 awards, respectively), and even BBC America snuck in, as Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany, who read her acceptance speech via smartphone, was a surprise pick for best actress in a drama series

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It’s Time for Marketers to Help Ease the Consumer Anxiety They’ve Helped Create

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

We're living in a time pervaded by fear. On one side of the current election , there's heavy conversation surrounding fear of immigrants, foreign powers, terrorism and the loss of what makes this country "great." The other side doesn't dispense that level of fear rhetoric, but they share a fair amount of social chatter about how it's simply all over for our nation and our future if the opposition wins. Jason Alan Snyder Headshot: Alex Fine And while we may condemn the fear both sides generate, marketers have to ask themselves what role they've played in setting the stage for this sort of national discussion. To what degree has our industry pushed for fear—and what can we do to turn things around? We have to acknowledge that as marketers, we have enabled, even encouraged, a persistent state of panic. And as a society, the technologies we are adopting are exaggerating this condition. I'm not saying it's right; I'm also not saying it's avoidable. This line of thinking is not an analysis of "crisis culture," or acceptance of it as a permanent state of being. Rather, we're acknowledging that crisis culture in marketing is real and pervasive. But I want to make clear that brands should genuinely help improve people's lives in the culture, despite the culture we have historically chosen to foster. This Means War (because everything means war). When I was born, in 1970, things were simpler. We only had wars where people killed each other. Then President Nixon declared a "war on drugs." This notion was later popularized and amplified by politics, media and marketing

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Q&A: Veteran UFC Marketer on Bringing Her A-Game to Canada Goose as Its New CMO

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Some people's idea of adventure is making a bold career move. Others like to plunge into the rugged outdoors. Jackie Poriadjian-Asch has done both. CMO Jackie Poriadjian-Asch Last month, after 15 years with Ultimate Fighting Championship (the bloody dynasty of mixed-martial arts), Poriadjian-Asch took the CMO's job at Canada Goose, the 59-year-old company famed for its costly (and lately quite trendy ) down-filled coats. For Poriadjian-Asch, the new job means not just a move from Las Vegas to Toronto, but a plunge into the world of rugged, outdoor fashion. Though just weeks into her tenure, Poriadjian-Asch is already working on the brand's fall/winter campaign (debuting today), the launch of new retail locations, and a couple projects with some Canadian dude named Drake . Adweek caught up with Poriadjian-Asch on a recent stopover in New York. Adweek: You're getting ready to unveil your new fall/winter campaign, "In the Elements." What's the story behind that? Jackie Poriadjian-Asch: The inspiration behind it was this idea of being at one with the elements and not feeling like you're fighting with them. So whatever Mother Nature throws at you, with Canada Goose, you'll be able to handle it. And the ads feature Crista Cober and Travis Fimmel—striking faces, but not superstar ones. Why'd you pick them? Not only is Cober an international beauty, but she's Canadian, and she's comfortable in the outdoors. She Instagrams herself hiking with her newborn. Fimmel was a Calvin Klein model years ago. It was really important that we captured him raw and masculine, which is who he is, and it worked perfectly with our intentions for the campaign. The landscapes are stunning and—just guessing here—they're in Canada?

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All 5 Broadcast Network Presidents Share Their Fall TV Playbooks

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After a season where none of the five broadcast networks grew their 18-49 audience (and ABC, Fox and NBC lost viewers in that demo), they will try to reverse that trend in the 2016-17 season, which officially kicks off Sept. 19. Over the next six weeks, the nets will roll out 20 new shows, plus 61 returning series. Adweek sat down with each of the network chiefs to talk about their strategy for the new season. Adweek: What's your most improved time slot this fall? Glenn Geller, president, CBS Entertainment: We have a real opportunity this year to grow a number of time periods: Fridays at 8 [with MacGyver], Tuesdays at 9 and 10 [with Bull and the relocated NCIS: New Orleans] and Mondays at 8 [with Kevin Can Wait and Man With a Plan]. Robert Greenblatt, chairman, NBC Entertainment: Thursdays at 9. Thursday is a night that we're reconfiguring, and Chicago Med is a really strong show that I hope will bring an audience with it to that time period. It wasn't doing badly with [The] Blacklist, but with Blacklist at 10 and Chicago Med in front of it, that time period could be improved. Gary Newman, co-chairman and co-CEO, Fox Television Group: I would expect it to be Wednesdays at 8, with Lethal Weapon. Channing Dungey, president, ABC Entertainment: Wednesdays at 10, with Designated Survivor. Mark Pedowitz, president, The CW: Mondays at 8 [with Supergirl, which The CW picked up from CBS].

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