How Treating Employees Well Boosts Brand Value

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This election season is putting issues like the fight for a higher minimum wage front and center, shining a light on how corporations treat their workers. And what's become clear is those companies that take care of their employees—and let their customers know about it—stand to boost their brand value. According to a recent Interbrand study, consumers' purchase consideration for both b-to-b and b-to-c brands is higher—and they're willing to pay more—if a company treats its employees well. Eighty-four percent of consumers consider a company's social commitments, including employee treatment, before deciding what to buy or where to shop, and 82 percent consider them when it comes to which products and services to recommend to friends, according to a 2015 study on global corporate social responsibility (CSR) by Cone Communications. "Branding used to be about what's happening outside of your door, but, increasingly, about 75 percent of the work that brands do is more squarely focused on how they get the greatest performance out of their employees, and how they lessen the gap between the executives and the front line [employees]," said Andrea Sullivan, CMO at Interbrand. Some companies, like Chobani, are literally sharing their wealth with their workforce. In April, the company's CEO, Hamdi Ulukaya, introduced a growth-sharing plan that gives full-time employees units that are worth around 10 percent of the company if it is sold or goes public. "It's always been Hamdi's dream for Chobani's success to be shared across the company," said Michael Gonda, vp of corporate communications at Chobani.

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This Shop Has a Creative Take on Media—It’s Not Just Following Trends

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who (L. to r.) CEO Greg March, COO Lindsay Lustberg and chief creative strategist Todd Alchin What Creative media agency Where New York and Los Angeles Before forming Noble People in 2011, Greg March, Lindsay Lustberg, Todd Alchin and Jason Clement worked as media executives at some of the industry's most acclaimed creative agencies: Wieden + Kennedy, Crispin Porter + Bogusky and Droga5. That experience provided a different way to approach media than the usual that often focuses on financial incentives over results. "At Noble we're not innovating around monetization," said CEO March. "That means pushing harder for more impactful insights and having the courage to not chase the silly buzzword or trend of the moment." This strategy has helped them win the business of companies like PayPal, Fresh Direct and Honest Tea. Last December, for PayPal subsidiary Braintree, the agency's research suggested that the client's target audience—web developers—would respond well to a campaign that hid messages in the source codes of popular tech. When the results came in, there was a 62 percent increase in brand awareness and a 92 percent lift in Braintree sign-ups. This story first appeared in the May 16, 2016 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.

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How Moleskine Went From Parisian Scribble Pad to Global Icon

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Lin-Manuel Miranda worked for six years to get his Grammy- and Pulitzer-winning musical Hamilton from his head onto a stage. He worked on the songs everywhere—on his honeymoon, on the subway—and, as the lyrics came to him, he committed them to a Moleskine notebook. Photo: Nick Ferrari; Parts Model: Body by Braha "Moleskine is an iconic object, with a very contemporary design, with only a slight retro look," said Arrigo Berni, CEO, Moleskine. "It connects the owner to a community of passionate users, past and present. It is a signifier." He's not kidding. The Moleskine notebook, though around in its present form only since 1997, represents the continuation of a literary and artistic lineage

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Fox Continued the Assault on Digital Media Metrics, and Wowed Buyers With a Solid New Slate

May 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just two events into the broadcast upfronts, the theme of this week is already clear: after absorbing punches from digital video companies for two weeks during the NewFronts, where they used questionable metrics to make the case that audiences are abandoning broadcast TV, the networks are swinging back, and giving every bit as good as they got. That was the case at Fox's upfront presentation, as the network set the tone early for buyers assembled at New York's Beacon Theatre. Fox played a video featuring Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane, who humorously discussed Fox's ability to attract and keep viewers' attention with "premium ads with attention-getting premium content," as opposed to "cheap ads paired with user-generated content on digital media. Why? No one knows or cares!" said MacFarlane. Toby Byrne, president, advertising sales, Fox Networks Group, extolled Fox's ability to earn "attention" with incredible scale (the same points he hammered home during FX's upfront in March ). Byrne repeatedly slammed digital video, which he termed "non-premium, subprime video," and noted that "the digital metrics game is rigged." As an example, he compared the published audience reach of "a YouTube star" and a World Series game, which both were 14 million. But the average audience for that YouTube star was only 1,620. Using YouTube's metrics, he added, the World Series game would have racked up 6.8 billion views. "Impressions for subprime video can't compare to TV's delivery," said Byrne. He noted that the highest viewer engagement happens on VOD, where Fox Networks have the top 6 VOD programs (including the top 4 broadcast series: Empire, The X-Files, Lucifer and Scream Queens), and over half of the top 50 VOD shows. Adding Hulu and other streaming outlets, 28 percent of Fox's entertainment viewing is non-linear, Byrne said

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Why Next Season Could Be the New Golden Age of the Family Sitcom

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Don't expect the classic sitcom Leave It to Beaver or squeaky-clean '90s shows like Family Matters and Perfect Strangers. But come next season, there's likely to be an abundance of new family-centric half hours on network TV. Added to returning hits like Modern Family, Black-ish and Mom, family comedies could take up more space on prime-time schedules than they have in decades. Hollywood's producers pumped out nearly 30 family-based comedy pilots during the recent development season, leaping ahead of other popular subgenres like workplace and relationship shows. This trend toward home and hearth is no accident. Several television executives made their 2016-17 schedule priorities clear in recent months, with CBS Entertainment president Glenn Geller telling The Hollywood Reporter that his must-have for next season was a "big family multicam," meaning a traditional three-camera comedy filmed in front of an audience. NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt cited "comedy, comedy, comedy" as his focus for the year, while ABC—which has had the most recent success in the genre—has once again looked at families of all stripes for its potential comedy pickups.

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As New Tech Emerges and Clients Demand Invention, Agencies Bank On Innovation Labs

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For the past few years, digital agency 360i had tinkered in its innovation lab with a line of toys to help those with paralysis actively play with children. This month, the concept became a reality with the release of the shop's Adaptoys campaign, which was launched in partnership with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. The goal is to raise $155,000 in order to build race cars controlled by headsets and later a voice-controlled pitching machine. Adaptoys is just one of the cool products to come out of the lab, which is designed to work with new technology and figure out ways to use them in client campaigns. Agency labs are not new—Resource/Ammirati, recently acquired by IBM, opened one of the first labs in 2006—but as new technology, from virtual reality to augmented reality, becomes more mainstream and clients demand more invention from agencies, innovation labs continue to grow apace. 360i vp, innovation technology Layne Harris said the work his team does shows clients that the agency is not just "reacting to trends" but rather is "steeply invested and knowledgeable about those trends." Over the years the agency's lab has become more ingrained in daily procedures and client work, rather than existing as an external unit for the shop. When the creative team works on a brief or pitch, someone from the innovation lab sits in, contributing ideas—this tactic helped spark the idea for Oscar Mayer's Mini Wiener Rover that delivers freshly made hot dogs. The benefits are clear for the client, but many agencies also find partnering with startups and other brands works just as well. Jonathan Bradley, partner, programs for R/GA Ventures, said hosting accelerator programs for startups—and eventually allowing some of the companies to reside in R/GA offices—promotes a "sharing of knowledge." The agency works with the startups, learns about the latest technologies and what they do, but also flexes its own creative muscles, which in turn leads to breakthrough work for clients. Smart tone startup Lisnr —which developed technology that sends an inaudible digital signal through speakers and activates an ad, a video or even a purchase via a user's smartphone—went through an R/GA accelerator and has benefited the agency, its clients and the startup enormously

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Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision. What's the biggest difference culturally between the two companies? What I have really enjoyed about being a part of Comcast NBCU is that we have a real mentality of running our businesses as owners, not renters. We really believe in making the investments in our businesses that will deliver long-term results

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Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision

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This Week’s Must-Haves: a Smart Mirror That Replicates Lighting From Anywhere

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, the Adweek staff is highlighting a smart mirror that can replicate lighting from anywhere in the world, a water bottle that reminds you to stay hydrated and more. Take a look!

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Fox Will Fill Its American Idol Void with 24, Prison Break and Other Familiar Brands

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fox's lineup is going to feel awfully familiar next season. No, the network isn't fielding mostly the same lineup as this season; on the contrary, the network will be without American Idol on its schedule for the first time since 2002. But going into the 2016-17 season, Fox will be filling that void with a number of shows that its audiences know and love: reboots and revivals of past hits 24 and Prison Break, and new series based on a pair of popular films, Lethal Weapon and The Exorcist. There will be so much nostalgia on the network that some viewers might confuse it with Nick at Nite. "Next season on Fox, we'll have more original programming across our schedule than ever before," said Fox Television Group co-chairmen and co-CEOs Dana Walden and Gary Newman in a statement. "We'll use our strong established hits in the fall and Super Bowl LI in winter to launch a diverse slate of shows that are unmistakably Fox." Fox is debuting three new series this fall (the same number as NBC, which announced its fall schedule on Sunday ), but the network is saving its biggest guns for midseason. That includes its 24 reboot, 24: Legacy, which will launch after next season's biggest event: Super Bowl LI, on Feb. 5. The show will move it to regular time period (Mondays at 8, the same as its predecessor) the following day. Undaunted by the failure of Minority Report, which audiences rejected immediately last fall, Fox has ordered series based on not one, but two hit films: The Exorcist and Lethal Weapon. Mondays this fall will feature Gotham and Lucifer, which remain in their current time slots.

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