Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Why the Super Bowl Halftime Show Has Become the Biggest Ad of All

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For brands that know the score, music and sports can be a winning combination—and nowhere more than the Super Bowl halftime show, the height of music, sports and pop culture on the world's ultimate stage. "They're a natural pairing," says Angela Natividad, international account director at social agency Darewin. "Sports and music are both highly emotional and moment oriented," she adds, and their union can help advertisers reach consumers in meaningful and memorable ways. "They align themselves extremely well," says Joe DiMuro, president of Frukt North America, a unit of sports and entertainment agency Octagon, and can work in tandem to "expand the ability of a brand to have relevancy," notably among millennials. "Music and sports are the key to youth passion," adds Omar Johnson, CMO of Beats by Dr. Dre. Brands that successfully fuse the two stand to "keep up with the speed of culture." Leveraging the music-sports nexus goes beyond booking bands to play at athletic events or licensing songs for ads. Today, savvy marketers are creating compelling live experiences matched with powerful campaigns. They're "generating an aesthetic and culture," says author and entertainment expert Patricia Martin. Ultimately, it's a lifestyle play, with advertisers seeking more vibrant roles in areas where consumers forge and reinforce their identities. The most notable music-sports integration of the year will ignite screens across the planet on Feb. 1, when pop princess Katy Perry takes the halftime stage during Super Bowl XLIX. Her glitzy, 12-minute set, sponsored by PepsiCo, will be broadcast by NBC to a television audience expected to exceed 110 million in the U.S. alone.

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Adweek Debuts Redesign With Its First Super Bowl Issue Today

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As in football, sticking with a playbook in publishing for too long can have dire consequences. If your routes become obvious, or stale, your competition will either do an end run around you or simply tear your head off at the line of scrimmage. So with this, our Super Bowl Issue, Adweek introduces a cover-to-cover revamp. (Might as well launch a redesign during advertising's biggest week of the year, right?) A staff-wide effort led by the enterprise and energy of editor Lisa Granatstein and executive creative director Nick Mrozowski, what you see here is a culmination of a makeover that actually began in bits and pieces some six months ago. Here, you will find that the department formerly known as Front is, in a nod to our buying and selling friends in the video space, restyled as Upfront. Trending Topics is rechristened as Trending, while Voice, Data Points, Mover (formerly First Mover) and Facetime each gets a new look. The unifying mission of it all is to deliver the same great news analysis in a fresh, dynamic and informative package. We've also added two weekly departments

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Why the Super Bowl Halftime Show Has Become the Best Ad of All

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For brands that know the score, music and sports can be a winning combination—and nowhere more than the Super Bowl halftime show, the height of music, sports and culture on the world's ultimate stage. "They're a natural pairing," says Angela Natividad, international account director at social agency Darewin. "Sports and music are both highly emotional and moment oriented," she adds, and their union can help advertisers reach consumers in meaningful and memorable ways. "They align themselves extremely well," says Joe DiMuro, president of Frukt North America, a unit of sports and entertainment agency Octagon, and can work in tandem to "expand the ability of a brand to have relevancy," notably among millennials. "Music and sports are the key to youth passion," adds Omar Johnson, CMO of Beats by Dr. Dre. Brands that successfully fuse the two stand to "keep up with the speed of culture." Leveraging the music-sports nexus goes beyond booking bands to play at athletic events or licensing songs for ads. Today, savvy marketers are creating compelling live experiences matched with powerful campaigns. They're "generating an aesthetic and culture," says author and entertainment expert Patricia Martin. Ultimately, it's a lifestyle play, with advertisers seeking more vibrant roles in areas where consumers forge and reinforce their identities. The most notable music-sports integration of the year will ignite screens across the planet on Feb. 1, when pop princess Katy Perry takes the halftime stage during Super Bowl XLIX. Her glitzy, 12-minute set, sponsored by PepsiCo, will be broadcast by NBC to a television audience expected to exceed 110 million in the U.S. alone. Millions more will stream the show on their computers and mobile devices and tune in worldwide. All told, the event will be viewed in 230 countries and territories. Super Bowl halftime is a playbook for other players, and events marrying music and sports are springing up with more frequency. "In the past, music and sports have often stayed in their own lanes," says Marcie Allen, president of MAC Presents, a music sponsorship and activation agency. "But more and more, we are seeing these worlds collide." In some cases, these events have become mini-festivals that play out over days.

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Why the Super Bowl Halftime Show Has Become the Best Ad of All

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For brands that know the score, music and sports can be a winning combination—and nowhere more than the Super Bowl halftime show, the height of music, sports and culture on the world's ultimate stage. "They're a natural pairing," says Angela Natividad, international account director at social agency Darewin. "Sports and music are both highly emotional and moment oriented," she adds, and their union can help advertisers reach consumers in meaningful and memorable ways. "They align themselves extremely well," says Joe DiMuro, president of Frukt North America, a unit of sports and entertainment agency Octagon, and can work in tandem to "expand the ability of a brand to have relevancy," notably among millennials. "Music and sports are the key to youth passion," adds Omar Johnson, CMO of Beats by Dr. Dre. Brands that successfully fuse the two stand to "keep up with the speed of culture." Leveraging the music-sports nexus goes beyond booking bands to play at athletic events or licensing songs for ads. Today, savvy marketers are creating compelling live experiences matched with powerful campaigns. They're "generating an aesthetic and culture," says author and entertainment expert Patricia Martin

Read More

Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI.

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Today Only, Amazon Is Discounting Prime to $72 and Streaming Transparent for Free

January 24, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Apparently on a charm offensive after winning two Golden Globes for its witty dramedy Transparent, Amazon is streaming the show for free today and offering a discount for new converts to its Prime service. Prime, a subscription bundle that includes video streaming, a music service, free delivery and other assorted benefits, is $72 for a year's subscription today. That's down from the usual rate of $99, for a savings of $27. (Already a subscriber? Kinja Deals recommends gifting yourself a subscription today and canceling auto-renew on your current Prime subscription. That'll reportedly activate the discounted subscription as soon as your current one ends.) Today's special rate comes out to $6 a month, beating out every competitor in the streaming video space. And it says one thing pretty clearly to the market: Amazon desperately wants to beef up its subscriber base. The tech giant is due Thursday for the corporate equivalent of a physical: its quarterly earnings report. That means a lot of transparency before Amazon's investors, to whom Amazon is basically under oath. And since you can't give too many "I'm not going to answer" answers before your share price drops, Amazon's leadership has to show return on investment. Luckily, they're in a good position to do that. Amazon spent $100 million on streaming content in a single quarter last year—some of that is undoubtedly acquisitions, some of it is probably marketing, but it's certainly a ton of money for a business that notoriously operates with extremely slim margins and spends its R&D money, um, fearlessly . But Prime has so many angles by which the company can win.

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