What Marketers Can Learn From America’s Election Shock

November 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If my Facebook newsfeed is any indication, the world of advertising is currently filled with hand-wringing, astonishment and in some cases, all-out despair. There are tears and complete shock that we seem to have gotten it all wrong. Liz Ross The results of the presidential election were shocking to many, especially with election forecasters putting Hillary Clinton's chance of winning at anywhere from 70 percent to as high as 99 percent. How they got it so wrong is a cautionary tale not just for pollsters, but for marketers as well. The absolute No. 1 takeaway we should have tattooed on our collective forehead is that data, and the subsequent algorithms we use to parse that data, do not understand human emotion, especially the most intense forms—love, hate, anger, joy and loneliness. Emotions, which define who we are as humans, do not fit on an election forecaster's data chart just as they cannot be summarized through an evaluation of our Amazon purchases or our online surfing behavior. Our digital selves only represent a piece (a small but growing piece) of who we are. While the digital footprint of those of us in cities is growing exponentially, we must not project our own behavior and patterns on those in other parts of the country. My running joke is that people on the West Coast all believe the U.S. will soon have its toilet paper delivered by drone and people on the East Coast believe that everyone buys their toilet paper one roll at a time. Neither of these things is true, of course, and the reality is that most of the people in the middle of the country live different lives than those on the coasts. So if we want to know something or claim to know something about a person or a community, we sure as hell better be tuned in to their humanity and not just their statistics. We are in advertising, one of the most amazing industries in the world—an industry of creative thinkers, eccentrics and people who challenge the status quo. We are also an industry filled with optimists, and no time in history have we needed optimism more than we do today. So let's be the optimists we are, and use this moment of national tension as a learning opportunity. Here are four ideas for how marketers can do things differently as a result of what we learned from the election: • Stop using the word "consumer." It is a pejorative term, indicating that there are mindless people waiting in the world for messages and information from brands. No one in the world simply consumes; they are complex humans who make choices every single day. Regarding them as actual people will make our marketing better

Read More

Ad of the Day: Homebuyers Start Turning Into Their Parents in Progressive’s New Ads

November 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Some serious Mommy and Daddy issues are amusingly on display in Arnold Worldwide's latest campaign for Progressive insurance. Homebuyers assume the most annoying traits of their parents in the ads, based on the insight that folks change in weird ways when they buy their first home. "It's as if you flip the 'grownup switch,' " Cat Kolodij, Progressive's business leader for marketing strategy and innovation, tells Adweek. "For many of us, the first time we realize we are grown up is when we catch ourselves doing something our mom or dad always did." The spot below shows a young wife acting like her father, with a gruff attitude, manly mannerisms and, worst of all, a taste for watching golf on TV: Honey, let's get divorced. You can keep the house! Next, a husband takes on the fuss-budget traits of his mother, right down to obsessive vacuuming and serving deviled eggs at all hours of the day: "Daughters are influenced by fathers as much as mothers," Kolodij says. "Sons are influenced by mothers as much as fathers. We didn't think the story had to conform to a traditional 'daughter-becomes-her-mother' paradigm. Since the insight is so true, we find people quickly get the idea." Too bad the characters didn't start dressing up like Flo and chasing each other around with name-your-price tools. (We're assured the iconic ad character will return for Progressive in the near future.) The new work trades in sitcom-y cliches, but director Roman Coppola keeps the material from lapsing into complete absurdity and coaxes spirited performances from the cast. "Roman is very good at identifying what's funny in an idea or a scene, and then nurturing that thing without overdoing it or pointing at it too hard," says agency executive creative director Sean McBride. "He told us from the beginning that he wanted to create moments that looked and felt like they were lifted from these people's lives." On set, improvisation was strongly encouraged.

Read More

How Disney Maintains a Strong Relationship With Its Millennial Audience

November 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Disney's brand doesn't want to be a tale as old as time. Thanks to creative thinking, adapting to new technology, and acting from an authentic point-of-view, Disney has been able to keep up with every age group of its fans. "As the audience evolves, we're making sure to lean in and being relevant to where they are," said Andrew Sugerman, evp of content and media with Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media. At the core of Disney's content creation team is what Sugerman calls "digitologists." "We needed a name for the folks who sit in the intersection of the Disney brand's placement in the cultural zeitgeist with the digital expertise of today," he said. "They create what's authentic to those original platforms and look at what's currently trending to put it through a relevant lens for Disney fans." That's the trick for legacy brands, it seems like, these days. How do you figure out how to stay relevant to a younger audience, like the oft-courted millennials, without seeming totally fake or pandering? For Disney, there's Babble, which is a news and entertainment site aimed at young parents. If you're in the 13- to 34-year-old crowd, then Oh My Disney is for you with quizzes and movie news. Disney LOL is geared around producing content for kids. But that's just the beginning. "We produce over 6,000 pieces of content per month across all of our channels," explained Sugerman. Disney lovers can find Disney content on multiple Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat accounts, in addition to messaging platforms and the websites themselves. "When you think about the 80-year legacy of these characters and stories, it's fun to think about how to connect the relevancy of those stories to an audience today," he said

Read More

Stephen Colbert Calls His Live Election Night Show ‘The Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done’

November 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stephen Colbert has had a lot of tough gigs in his career, but he says nothing compares to his live Election Night special for Showtime, which became more of a wake than a comedy show due to Donald Trump's surprise victory . "That show was the hardest thing I've ever done in my entire life," Colbert said Saturday night. "The audience was sobbing openly." Colbert made his comments while holding an election postmortem with fellow late-night host (and Daily Show alum) John Oliver, as part of a Montclair Film Festival fundraiser at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark, N.J. In the leadup to his Showtime election night show, which Colbert was able to do because CBS had preempted The Late Show with Stephen Colbert that night for election coverage, "we had gone over every possible eventuality. We had so many guests, we had so many pretaped pieces, all based on a different eventuality," including that Hilllary Clinton won, or Clinton was the likely winner but the race was too close to call, or that Trump was possibly going to win. "And then there was the last show, the show we did, Donald Trump is going to win and we know he's going to win. And then execs and my writers were like, 'You don't want to write something for that?' And I was like, 'No!'" said Colbert, explaining that performing jokes about Trump winning the presidency for his studio audience of 400 would be like doing standup comedy during an execution. Of course, that's pretty much what unfolded that night. "Over my guests' shoulders, people kept putting up signs: Florida, Ohio, Iowa, Nebraska," recalled Colbert, referring to the states that Trump had won. "We only did about 20 minutes of material before we went, fuck it, it's going to be him, let's just talk for another hour. We have two and a half whole shows that you will never ever see of material that we had to kill that night." That unaired material included a number of pretaped pieces and a parade of naked men "with high, tight butts," said Colbert. "They were going to going to come out there and painted on their asses, it said, 'I'm with her, exclamation point.'" Colbert also addressed the recent controversy around fake news on sites like Google and Facebook , and said he and Oliver took issue with the term. "Because what we did was fake news" as correspondents on The Daily Show, Colbert said.

Read More

Mark Zuckerberg Has Admitted That Facebook Has a Problem With Fake News

November 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ten days after the U.S. presidential election, Mark Zuckerberg admitted that his company has a problem with proliferating fake stories across the internet. In a Facebook post late on Friday night, the Facebook CEO admitted that fighting fake news on the platform is a problem that's complex "both technically and philosophically"—a stark change in tone after spending the past week defending the platform against accusations that faux reports helped the Republican president-elect Donald Trump win the White House. Although he previously had said the accusations that Facebook was full of fake news were " crazy ," Zuckerberg wrote that the company is now working on several projects to cut down on misinformation. Those projects include improving ways to better detect and classify misinformation, making it easier for users to report fake stories, adding third-party verification and exploring ways to label stories that have been "flagged as false." "The bottom line is: we take misinformation seriously," Zuckerberg wrote. "Our goal is to connect people with the stories they find most meaningful, and we know people want accurate information. We've been working on this problem for a long time, and we take this responsibility seriously. We've made significant progress, but there is more work to be done." Earlier this week, Facebook and Google—which have both faced criticism about fake news since the election —announced plans to cut off advertising revenue to fake news sites on their platforms. On Thursday, U.S

Read More

How the Election Hurt Ecommerce and 6 Other Interesting Digital Marketing Stats

November 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the presidential election behind us and the holidays ahead, there's been an interesting mix of digital marketing stats this week. Check out seven that caught our eye: 1. Voting at the expense of shopping HookLogic, part of Criteo, found that an election can hurt online retailers. Its cross-client study discovered that ecommerce dropped 5 percent year-over-year (YOY) the day before the election, fell 16 percent YOY the day of and plummeted 23 percent YOY the day after . 2. Black Friday shoppers are usually married Experian Marketing Services worked with SpotRight to study consumers mentioning #BlackFriday on Twitter. The analysis found that Black Friday shoppers are 53 percent women, 60 percent between the ages of 26-50, and 73 percent are married

Read More

Carnival Is Using Facial Recognition on Cruises to Help Passengers Buy Photos of Themselves

November 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The next time you take a Carnival cruise, don't be surprised if the brand digitally tags you in photos taken aboard the ship. The Carnival Vista just finished making its first transatlantic trip and is docked in New York this week to show off what Carnival Cruise Line claims is its largest and most souped-up ship to date. Among the ship's high-tech amenities is a digital photo experience built by SapientNitro-owned Second Story that uses digital accounts to store photos professional photographers take on the ship. Here's how it works: Carnival Vista passengers are given accounts that are tied to their room information and photos of themselves. There are a handful of photographers on each trip paid to take photos of travelers. In the past, the photographers took photos, printed them out and hung them on a wall on the ship.

Read More

James Corden Eats Foraged Moss and Designs a 3D Printed Car in Chase’s New Video Series

November 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

James Corden is taking a break from singing with celebrities on Carpool Karaoke to designing his own 3D-printed cars in a new campaign for Chase Sapphire. Corden stars in "Reserve What's Next," Chase's video series that explores the future of travel and next-level travel experiences. "Our cardholders are interested in what's next in the industry. They would have been the first people to try Airbnb five years ago, and the first to discover Uber," said Susan Canavari, Chase's chief brand officer. "We're showing them things that are launching in the very near term, so they can be one of the first to experience them." For example, the first episode of the series features Corden and chef Mads Refslund. The two discuss the chef's "fire and ice" culinary method, which calls for fish cooked in sand, vegetables smoked by ice and foraged moss.

Read More

How Marketing Helped Milk-Bone Create the $3 Billion Dog-Treat Market

November 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If it weren't for the organic chemist who invented margarine, the dogs of America would have no treats. Or so the story goes, but first the facts. Dog treats are serious business in this country. According to the American Pet Products Association , over 54 million households include a dog (often more than one, as the total number of pet dogs stands at 77.8 million). Americans dropped a cool $23 billion on food for their dogs last year, a figure that includes $3 billion just for treats. And of those treats? The most popular is Milk-Bone dog biscuits. Nick Ferrari What's more, Milk-Bone has enjoyed that status for 108 years

Read More

This Week’s Must-Haves: Kate Spade’s New Smart Bangle Is as Smart as It Is Stylish

November 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, the Adweek staff is highlighting Kate Spade's new connected jewelry, a luxe "smart" pen and notebook, minimalist desk accessories and more. Take a look!

Read More