U.S. Women’s Soccer Hopes These Charming Animated Videos Will Keep Fans Interested After the Olympics

July 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The U.S. Women's Soccer team thrilled fans last year with its epic World Cup win, and it's set to do it again starting next week at the 2016 Olympics. Last week, U.S. Soccer launched an animated video series to fire people up to watch the team compete for its fourth consecutive gold medal in Rio and to keep fans tuned into the sport beyond major tournaments like the World Cup and Olympics. The videos, produced by U.S. Soccer and animated by Calabash Animation studios in Chicago, appear on U.S. Soccer's website and YouTube channel and feature the 18 players from the 2016 Olympic team and coach Jill Ellis. Each video includes a story from a player's past about her journey to the Olympic team. For instance, Megan Rapinoe talks about the childhood bond she shares with her twin sister; Crystal Dunn discusses how she overcame her anxieties about being short as a young soccer player; and Meghan Klingenberg talks about her college soccer team's successful attempt to break in to a late night basketball event at the University of North Carolina. Ahead of the men's World Cup in 2014 and women's World Cup in 2015, U.S. Soccer launched efforts like this one to increase engagement with casual soccer fans, including a video series called 23 Stories, which focused on the background of each player on the men's and women's national teams. "We have so many die-hard fans, but during the World Cup and Olympics, we have more of what we call a red-white-and-blue fan. Patriotism plays a big part [in the reason they watch]," said Neil Buethe, U.S. Soccer's director of communications. "They may not know as much about the team and the players, so we wanted to introduce players to those new fans in an entertaining way

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This Co-Working Space Boasts Private Offices and a Fully-Stocked Resource Library

July 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fuigo, a design-focused company founded by the brothers who helm the textile company Fortuny, recently launched an upscale co-working space. The space, located on New York’s Park Avenue South, is the only co-working facility dedicated to interior designers, allowing Fuigo to cater to their specific needs. In fact, along with the opening of the space, Fuigo launched the new tech platform that the in-house designers can use to manage their businesses. Currently, 12 designers work out of the office, but that count is expected to rise to 150 by the end of 2018. And when it does, Fuigo will have more resources in place to help them succeed. “[The Fuigo resource library] is fully staffed by a ‘resource oracle,’” said co-founder Maury Riad. “It is a critical resource for designers who are constantly in need of product samples, brochures and literature so they can efficiently complete their projects. When complete, it will have product from over 1,500 vendors.”

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This Week’s Must-Haves: a Chic Vacation Hat That Lets People Know You’ve Unplugged

July 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, the Adweek staff is highlighting Eugenia Kim's vacation-ready straw hat, an outdoor pizza grill that doubles as a charger and more. Take a look!

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CBS Spins Off Carpool Karaoke Into Its Own Series, on Apple Music

July 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Late Late Show with James Corden wasn't kidding about trying to beat Spike's new rival series (also combining cars and karaoke) to the punch. Today, CBS Television Studios announced that Apple Music had landed global rights to Carpool Karaoke, a series based on the wildly popular segment from The Late Late Show. It will be created and produced by Corden and Late Late Show executive producer Ben Winston. The weekly series will consist of 16 episodes, in which celebrities ride along with the host and "visit places meaningful to the celebrity," according to the release. A host (which is very unlikely to be Corden) and premiere date will be announced later. CBS said Carpool Karaoke will also continue as a recurring segment on The Late Late Show. Apple Music is available in more than 100 countries. The service, which gives subscribers access to more than 30 million songs, costs $9.99 per month. While the show is obviously a good fit for Apple Music, it's still surprising that CBS didn't put the series on its own fledgling streaming service, CBS All Access. Executive producers had initially been dismissive of efforts to spin off Carpool Karaoke, as The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon had done with Lip Sync Battle on Spike

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With Verizon Deal, Yahoo and AOL Are Finally Together

July 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Yahoo's long, winding and rocky road has finally come to its conclusion. Verizon announced this morning that it has acquired Yahoo's operating business for roughly $4.83 billion, which had long been expected ever since Yahoo put its core business up for sale. The deal, which is subject to usual regulatory and shareholder approvals, is expected to close early next year. When it does, it will finally wed Yahoo with AOL, which Verizon bought last year. "Just over a year ago we acquired AOL to enhance our strategy of providing a cross-screen connection for consumers, creators and advertisers," said Verizon chairman and CEO Lowell McAdam, in announcing the deal.

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Adweek’s Creative 100: Meet the Top Thinkers, Makers and Doers in Marketing and Media

July 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If creativity, deep down, is just inventive problem solving, clearly it's more in demand than ever in a world of increasingly complex business challenges—and a political and cultural landscape, in America and globally, that seems to be spiraling into nightmare. Adweek's sophomore edition of the Creative 100 —our annual list celebrating masters of the creative idea—profiles 100 unique and fascinating problem solvers from the worlds of advertising, media, technology, branding, pop culture and more. Just as advertising has taken a broader role in addressing issues beyond the corporate bottom line, this list also honors creatives who aren't just profit generators. Our cover star, Milana Vayntrub, is a perfect example—an improv actress whose creativity drives business for AT&T but also, in her activist work for Syrian refugees, helps some of the world's most disenfranchised people. Many of our 2016 honorees are hybrids in a similar fashion.

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How Milana Vayntrub Quickly Rose From Surprise Ad Star Into a Creative Force for Good

July 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Vayntrub has appeared in 40 spots for AT&T, although she was only supposed to be in one. Photography by Robert Ascroft The first thing you need to know about Milana Vayntrub is that she's much more than the bubbly, witty AT&T store manager Lily Adams who she plays in the ads from BBDO New York—though she won't fault you if that's why you recognize her, and she's very happy to have the work, thank you very much. It's a sweltering July morning, and we're in the heart of Los Angeles' Silicon Beach, at YouTube Space L.A., where Vayntrub has sequestered herself to digest footage she filmed the week before in Azraq, Jordan. In January, she released a 13-minute documentary, Milana Can't Do Nothing, introducing the public to her own refugee story (her family fled Uzbekistan for the U.S. in 1989) and making clear the uninhabitable conditions that many Syrian refugees find when they do make it to Greece. Now she's working on a follow-up. She'll spend the next month hunched over her laptop, editing a new doc that will show people who have donated to the nonprofit she has since created, Can't Do Nothing, and where their dollars have gone, while using her own recognizable face to bring attention back to the ongoing refugee crisis. As we sit in the chilly editing room, the 29-year-old actress, director and activist—and now, Adweek's Creative 100 cover star—tries to reconcile the refugee project with her other creative pursuits. She has a bit part in this month's Ghostbusters, she's just wrapped filming on a new David Wain movie, A Stupid and Futile Gesture, and she's directing a new show for the Upright Citizens Brigade. She feels privileged to be involved in so many projects, and knows that at least some of that success is thanks to the high-profile AT&T campaign that's put her squarely in the spotlight on national TV for two and a half years. Since December 2013, Vayntrub has appeared in 40 spots for the brand, though she was only supposed to appear in one. Adweek's cover star is working on a second documentary about refugees. Styling: Xavier le Bron; Hair: Mishelle Parry/Celestine Agency; Makeup: Leibi Carias/Celestine Agency; Manicure: Chelsea King/Celestine Agency "The first spot was so successful for us that we thought, let's do another one and then another one and then another one. It was so well-received that we kept bringing her back," says Valerie Vargas, vp of advertising and marketing communications for AT&T. "I think Milana's Lily resonates with audiences because she's a multi-dimensional character in a way that's rare for commercials," says Hungry Man director Hank Perlman, who has been behind the camera for most of the Lily spots. "We try as hard as we can not only to make her funny but to make her as strong, smart and human as possible.

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Jon Stewart Takes Down Roger Ailes and Donald Trump in His First Daily Show-Style Rant in 11 Months

July 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ever since Jon Stewart stepped down as host of The Daily Show last August, his fans have been begging him to return to late-night and deliver his brilliant, incisive political takedowns, especially in this year's over-the-top presidential race. While Stewart has mostly stayed out of the spotlight, he couldn't resist weighing in on two of the most seismic events to hit the Republican Party in modern times, both of which happened just hours apart: Donald Trump's officially accepting the Republican nomination for President at the Republican National Convention Thursday night and Roger Ailes' stunning resignation as chairman and CEO of Fox News two weeks after he was sued for sexual harassment. So Thursday night, Stewart briefly stepped in for pal Stephen Colbert, during his live broadcast of the Late Show with Stephen Colbert. He slipped on a suit jacket and clip-on tie and settled in at Colbert's desk to deliver his first late-night political rant in 11 months. Stewart, who also made a cameo appearance on Monday's Late Show, popped up after Colbert talked about Ailes' departure–and asked the camera to pan away so he could celebrate offscreen. Stewart also indulged in a bit of off-camera jubilation, before unleashing his own version of Throwback Thursday. "I was wondering if I could just maybe talk about the election for a little bit," he told Colbert, asking the Late Show host to step aside so he could take his seat. First, Stewart talked about the just-concluded Republican National Convention, observing that "the Republicans appear to have a very clear plan for America: One, jail your political opponent. Two, inject Rudy Giuliani with a speedball-and-Red Bull enema, and, three, spend the rest of the time scaring the holy bejesus out of everybody." He quickly pivoted to the true focus of his ire: Fox News host Sean Hannity—whom Stewart nicknamed "Lumpy"—and his hypocrisy in calling President Obama elitist while overlooking and/or praising similar traits in Trump

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It’s Official: Roger Ailes Resigns From Fox News Amid Sexual Harassment Allegations

July 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After a flurry of bizarre reports earlier this week, confirmed then quickly denied, about Roger Ailes' exit from Fox News, it's now official: The chairman and CEO is departing the top-ranked cable news network he co-founded in 1996. Ailes has resigned, effective immediately, 21st Century Fox announced. Rupert Murdoch, executive chairman of 21st Century Fox, will take over as chairman and acting CEO of Fox News and Fox Business Network. "Roger Ailes has made a remarkable contribution to our company and our country. Roger shared my vision of a great and independent television organization and executed it brilliantly over 20 great years," said Murdoch in a statement. "I am personally committed to ensuring that Fox News remains a distinctive, powerful voice

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MediaCom Names Deutsch Veteran as Its New Chief Strategy Officer

July 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

MediaCom has hired Anush Prabhu, a longtime veteran of the Deutsch organization, as its new managing partner and chief strategy officer in New York. In 2015, Prabhu appeared on both Adweek's Young Influentials list and its Media All-Stars list . In the new role, he will join the WPP agency's executive management board reporting directly to MediaCom USA CEO Sasha Savic. "Anush brings a valuable combination of media expertise, data chops and analytics experience, coupled with a true sense of how creative and communications can positively impact consumer beliefs and behaviors," said Savic. "His professional DNA is a perfect match for our positioning as The Content + Connections Agency." Before joining MediaCom, Prabhu served as partner, chief channel planning and investment officer at the New York offices of Deutsch. This period marked his second stint with the IPG agency, which he joined as an assistant account executive in 2000 before working his way up to the vp, director of CRM strategy position. He left in 2007 and subsequently held top planning and communications roles at JWT and mcgarrybowen before returning to Deutsch in 2012. Throughout his career, he has worked with a variety of clients including J&J, United Healthcare, Sherwin-Williams, Microsoft and Verizon. "The media agency of the future must be able to navigate and develop client-centric solutions at the intersection of creativity, data and technology," said Prabhu in a statement. "This belief drove my decision to join MediaCom, one of the best, most original and most passionately committed agencies in the world.

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