This Week’s Must-Haves: a Smart Pill Dispenser for the Entire Family

May 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, the Adweek staff showcases must have gear ranging from a high-tech pill dispenser that organizes and tracks medications for the entire family and an analog instant camera that marries old-school photography with high-tech features, to a modern, urban take on a classic backyard and frat house pastime. Check it out!

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This West L.A. Shop Designed Its Offices to Be Quirky, Charming and Modern

May 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Clever Creative, a 14-person branding and design firm located in the West Los Angeles neighborhood of Mar Vista, is entrusted by clients like Sephora, Ritz-Carlton and American Girl with creating that certain something that will endear consumers to their brands. Since inspiring feelings through aesthetics is the agency’s specialty, it’s only natural that its headquarters would be not only a laid-back space to create but also carefully curated. “The vision … was to create a modern, open floor plan with natural light and organic materials,” explained founder and CEO Shannon Gabor. What resulted was “a sophisticated space merging the concept of design agency with creative cabin,” she said, featuring exposed brick, concrete floors and natural pine paneling mixed with modern elements like copper fixtures and spotlights. There’s even a colorful gnome garden on the roof for an added touch of whimsy.

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As the 2015-16 Season Wraps Up, CBS Declares Victory in Total Viewers and Adults 18-49

May 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The 2015-16 TV season ends tomorrow, and CBS—with a big assist from Super Bowl 50—has declared victory across the board. The network will finish this season No. 1 in total viewers (10.9 million), adults 18-49 (2.3 rating) and adults 25-54 (3.1 rating). While the network routinely wins each season in total viewers—this is the eighth straight year it has done so—this is only CBS' second season win in the coveted 18-49 demo during the last decade (see below). NBC, which won the 18-49 crown the past two years, slipped to No. 2. The network got a big assist from Super Bowl 50, which drew 111.9 million viewers in February , just as last year's Super Bowl helped NBC secure the top spot for the 2014-15 season. Leslie Moonves, CBS Corp. chairman and CEO, preemptively declared victory last Wednesday during CBS' upfront.

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Steve Harvey on Advertising Inequality, His Punishing Schedule and Retirement Plans

May 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For his cover story in last week's issue of Adweek, Steve Harvey talked about how he juggles four hit TV series (soon to be five) and a radio show , and how he survived his Miss Universe debacle and came out the real winner . But with so many shows and project on his plate, there wasn't space in the magazine for everything that Harvey discussed. Here are the best moments that didn't make it into the story, including Harvey's thoughts on his punishing schedule, why his shows don't always bring in the ad revenue that they should and how he plans to spend his retirement: Six shows, three cities Harvey wasn't kidding when he said his mantra is to make every minute count. Filming five TV shows and a radio show requires him to commute between three different cities: Atlanta (his home, where his business offices and radio studio are located, and where he shoots Family Feud 10 weeks each summer, four episodes a day, for 200 shows a season), Chicago (he tapes two episodes of his talk show each Tuesday and Thursday, from late August to May, 140 episodes per year); and Los Angeles (he taped Little Big Shots for a week last October and a weekend in November; Celebrity Family Feud shoots two weekends in March and Dream Funder, his upcoming ABC series, will film on weekends sometime between October and November). And 272 days a year, he records his four-hour morning radio show from whichever location he happens to be in. Harvey works nonstop—sometimes six or seven days a week—except for three weeks around his wedding anniversary every year, and two weeks at Christmas. He knows that five weeks of vacation sounds like a luxury to some, "but it's 47 weeks of high level intensity on-camera, in your face. It's a lot of pressure right now. I can handle it, because I enjoy what I do. But I don't know how long I'll do all of them." (In the story, he said that he plans to walk away from one of his TV shows: "I do love all of these gigs, but something is going to have to go for sure.") Advertising inequality During his cover interview, Harvey spoke out against the industry's tendency to marginalize him as an entertainer who only appeals to minority audiences. His WB sitcom drew ratings similar to those of other shows on the network, like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, yet received fewer ad dollars because it was deemed a "black" show. "We've got to stop that. Pay a person for the number they get, and pay the advertising on the show based on the number that show gets. They find a way to cheapen it by saying, 'Well, you've got too many African-Americans watching here, too many Latinos, not enough whites. They use that just to get a lower rate and that's so unfair, man," said Harvey. "Every corporation has a 'multicultural marketing department,' which is just another word for the blacks and the Mexicans. Really, that's what it is. And that's so ridiculous. Family Feud isn't big because of black people or just white people

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Why Presidential Candidates Should Only Share Political Memes With Great Caution

May 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If 2012 was the "Twitter Election," this year's presidential race is more about zingers in the form of memes and GIFs than 140 characters—especially with presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump socking it to his rivals daily on social media. Such buzzy blurbs can be funny, they can be mean, they can go viral, and they can backfire. Whatever the result, marketing experts believe that Trump and the Democrats—whether Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders is the nominee—will need to sharpen their skills around using such formats. "Memes and GIFs are the perfect expression in the era of snark and Snapchat," explained marketing consultant David Deal. "And the 2016 election is already a troll's dream." The numbers bear that out, with Trump clearly dominating the conversation. This month the candidate ran an Instagram ad that ended with video of former Secretary of State Clinton laughing maniacally in a clip taken out of context and laid over a fiery scene from the infamous Benghazi attack, which killed two American diplomats and brought the Democrat under intense scrutiny

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Esquire’s New Editor Wants to ‘Reimagine the Way Fashion Can Be Done’

May 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Editor in chief of Esquire; editorial director of Town & Country Previous gig Editor in chief of Town & Country Age 46 Twitter @jayfielden Adweek: Growing up, were you an Esquire reader? Jay Fielden: Sure I was. I tell this story in my first editor's letter, when I was about 13 or 14 and growing up in San Antonio, I started getting into magazines, and Esquire and The New Yorker were two magazines that I just got curious about and wanted to know more about. They were probably both a little above my head at the time. But I started having that experience with magazines that I envision still being the most powerful thing a magazine can do, that kind of religious conversion where you realize you want to see this thing every month. So that was the beginning. What made Esquire such an important brand? Because it was genre-busting. When you have Nora Ephron writing about breasts, when you have Joan Didion writing for it, when you do the kind of covers they did, a lot of it punched through the culture. It was something highly relevant, on the pulse, fitfully trying to and succeeding at often leading the cultural conversation, saying things no one else was, doing things no one else was. What changes will you be bringing to the magazine? Even though there's a tremendous history there, this is a moment where you have to pretend there's no history and see it as just a reboot and an opportunity to ask the hardest questions. I just spent five years at Town & Country reimagining what Town & Country was

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Esquire’s New Editor Wants to ‘Reimagine the Way Fashion Can Be Done’

May 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Editor in chief of Esquire; editorial director of Town & Country Previous gig Editor in chief of Town & Country Age 46 Twitter @jayfielden Adweek: Growing up, were you an Esquire reader? Jay Fielden: Sure I was. I tell this story in my first editor's letter, when I was about 13 or 14 and growing up in San Antonio, I started getting into magazines, and Esquire and The New Yorker were two magazines that I just got curious about and wanted to know more about. They were probably both a little above my head at the time. But I started having that experience with magazines that I envision still being the most powerful thing a magazine can do, that kind of religious conversion where you realize you want to see this thing every month. So that was the beginning. What made Esquire such an important brand? Because it was genre-busting. When you have Nora Ephron writing about breasts, when you have Joan Didion writing for it, when you do the kind of covers they did, a lot of it punched through the culture. It was something highly relevant, on the pulse, fitfully trying to and succeeding at often leading the cultural conversation, saying things no one else was, doing things no one else was. What changes will you be bringing to the magazine? Even though there's a tremendous history there, this is a moment where you have to pretend there's no history and see it as just a reboot and an opportunity to ask the hardest questions. I just spent five years at Town & Country reimagining what Town & Country was. [At Esquire], I want to reimagine the way fashion can be done in the pages, and I want to make sure that the level of the writing and the journalism kind of becomes a constant throughout all the pages. I don't want it to feel like there's two different guys reading this: one who's reading it for the fashion and the style, and then one guy who wants it for the 10,000-word well-reported article

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VCCP Acquires Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer to Form Creative Partnership

May 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Over the years, agency holding companies have approached San Francisco-based agency Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer about partnerships, but its executives dismissed them every time. "We never gave it much thought. It wasn't something we needed or were looking for," said John Matejczyk, the agency's executive creative director. But when London-based VCCP came calling, seeking out a U.S.-based partner, the arrangement made sense for both agencies. Today, Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer and VCCP are announcing a new creative partnership. The two agencies will form an international network, continuing to operate with the same staff, and combining their client roster. "We wanted to find a partner in the U.S. who had the same focus on creative work, the same challenger mentality. We spent two years looking for that agency, and when I met these guys, I thought, I wasted two years of my life," said Adrian Coleman, co-founder and CEO of VCCP. "It's the coming together of two agencies that can help grow each other." Added Matt Hofherr, director of strategy at Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer, "It's about like-minded people. It felt like a marriage of sames: same principles, same drive, same ambitions." Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer's clients include AAA, Audi, OXO, method, SoFi, for which it produced spots for this year's Super Bowl, and Netflix, for which it launched a clever streaming Yule Log campaign in 2013. VCCP's clients include BMW Motorcycles, O2, Molson Coors and easyJet. The new network will include VCCP's offices in London, Madrid, Prague, Sydney and Berlin, and Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer's office in San Francisco

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Fashion Brands, Long Focused on Excess, Are Finally Waking Up to Sustainability

May 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Yael Aflalo, founder of buzzy fashion retailer Reformation, experienced first-hand the scale of Chinese pollution, she made a decision. Today, her company has a near-religious focus on reducing waste by incorporating sustainable practices throughout its supply chain. Ana Andejelic Reformation's motto: "We make killer clothes that don't kill the environment." Reformation gets that people increasingly make buying decisions based on evaluation that is simultaneously monetary and social. For fashion brands, that means fashion and sustainability must co-exist. When people buy pieces of Reformation clothing, they pay for the knowledge of how and where each item was made. They're paying a premium not just for the great fit and quality of Reformation's products or to wear the badge of a hot brand, but also for something they believe. Of course, there are plenty of people who maniacally buy clothes just because they are cheap. But there is an increasing number of fashion consumers who redefine what the price for a piece of clothing means; for them, a price is also appraisal, praise and prize. It's not surprising then that the fastest-growing fashion upstarts today sit precisely at this intersection of doing good and doing well, of price and praise.

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These 5 Great Campaigns Won Black and White Pencils at 2016 D&AD

May 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two Black Pencils, three White Pencils and 61 Yellow Pencils were handed out Thursday night in London at the 54th D&AD Professional Awards Ceremony. Winning an ultra-exclusive Black Pencil were U.K. technology startup what3words for "The World Addressed," a campaign to gives every 3-by-3-meter square in the world an address; and Japanese design firm iyamadesign for its spatial design of the "mt expo 2015" on behalf of masking tape brand Kamoi Kakoshi. See videos about those campaigns here: Adweek responsive video player used on /video. Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

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