Flowchart: The Best Way To Watch Super Bowl XLIX

January 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

You don't need a big-screen TV to watch Super Bowl XLIX. With the growth of digital platforms, there's plenty of ways to view the game. Whether you're more comfortable keeping tabs in real time with social media or you just like to watch the 30-second spots, we've created this handy flow chart to help you navigate a plethora of options. Don't worry: For those of you who hate football and commercials, we've got you covered, too.

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Rainn Wilson Shares His Favorite Super Bowl Ad (He Just Can’t Remember What It’s For)

January 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Rainn Wilson Age 49 Claim to Fame

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This Winter’s Timeslot Battles Feature Some of the Strangest Shows on the Dial

January 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Broadcast networks are pitting their bench players against each other after a particularly poor showing in the fall. Some matchups are anyone's guess, and some are just plain weird. Interestingly, there's more new content than usual on the air this winter, quite a bit of it from ABC. With the distraction of the Super Bowl soon to be over, these shows have to perform well, and quickly: May, and cancellation, isn't far away.

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Nascar Legends Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt Loom Large in New Campaign

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stock car legends Richard "The King" Petty and the late Dale "The Intimidator" Earnhardt won the most Nascar season titles with seven apiece—putting them in rarified air among the many drivers who have raced over the decades. Richard "The King" Petty provides voiceover in new spots. | Photo: Tom Pennington/Nascar via Getty Images Nascar and title sponsor Comcast will tap into their regal racing legacy to position the renamed Nascar Xfinity Series as the proving ground where future legends are born. Four out of five Nascar fans are also NFL fans. Comcast will use the spotlight around this weekend's Super Bowl XLIX to promote the kickoff of the 2015 Xfinity series Feb. 21 at Daytona International Speedway. Comcast and Nascar gave Adweek an exclusive look at the new campaign by Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco. The new spot will break Jan. 30 during NBC Sports Network's coverage of Nascar Hall of Fame ceremonies, then re-air on NFL Network's Super Bowl Saturday Night and NBC's coverage of the NFL Honors show the night before the Big Game. Called "Out There," the first 30-second spot features a voiceover by the folksy Petty. The King notes there's some aggressive young Xfinity driver out there, right now, who could "intimidate The Intimidator."

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ESPN’s Music Focus: How Athletes and Artists Are Learning From Each Other

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In recent years, ESPN's music focus has come to rival that of MTV. The cable network uses songs from diverse artists to bolster its sports coverage—and makes music a regular feature of its glossy magazine to entice readers and ad dollars. ESPN The Magazine's third "Music Issue" dropped last Friday, once

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Why the Super Bowl Halftime Show Has Become the Biggest Ad of All

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For brands that know the score, music and sports can be a winning combination—and nowhere more than the Super Bowl halftime show, the height of music, sports and pop culture on the world's ultimate stage. "They're a natural pairing," says Angela Natividad, international account director at social agency Darewin. "Sports and music are both highly emotional and moment oriented," she adds, and their union can help advertisers reach consumers in meaningful and memorable ways. "They align themselves extremely well," says Joe DiMuro, president of Frukt North America, a unit of sports and entertainment agency Octagon, and can work in tandem to "expand the ability of a brand to have relevancy," notably among millennials. "Music and sports are the key to youth passion," adds Omar Johnson, CMO of Beats by Dr. Dre. Brands that successfully fuse the two stand to "keep up with the speed of culture." Leveraging the music-sports nexus goes beyond booking bands to play at athletic events or licensing songs for ads. Today, savvy marketers are creating compelling live experiences matched with powerful campaigns. They're "generating an aesthetic and culture," says author and entertainment expert Patricia Martin. Ultimately, it's a lifestyle play, with advertisers seeking more vibrant roles in areas where consumers forge and reinforce their identities. The most notable music-sports integration of the year will ignite screens across the planet on Feb. 1, when pop princess Katy Perry takes the halftime stage during Super Bowl XLIX. Her glitzy, 12-minute set, sponsored by PepsiCo, will be broadcast by NBC to a television audience expected to exceed 110 million in the U.S. alone.

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