Jenny Slate’s Bedtime Routine Includes a Little Weed

July 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Jenny Slate Age 32 Accomplishments Star of Obvious Child (in theaters now); co-star of FX series Married (Thursdays at 10 p.m.); guest star on Kroll Show , Parks and Recreation, House of Lies and Bob’s Burgers Base Los Angeles What’s the first information you consume in the morning? Oftentimes I grab my phone by my bed and read my email, but sometimes I’ll go into the kitchen and I turn on KPCC in L.A. and listen to NPR’s Morning Edition. What are your go-to social media platforms? Twitter . I have an Instagram account, but I don’t use it that often. My Facebook is defunct; I haven’t used it in years. Who do you follow on Twitter? Gabe Liedman, Max Silvestri, Dean Fleischer-Camp (my husband), Chelsea Peretti, Noah Garfinkel and then, you know, like, Cher. How do you get your news? I get my news from NPR. I have it on in the car all day. We don’t have cable TV because I’m in a constant argument with my husband over whether we should have it. I want it, and he doesn’t

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The Chairman of the FCC Is Annoyed With Time Warner Cable

July 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Maybe it was the widespread feeling that Tom Wheeler is too close to the industry he regulates . Maybe it was pressure from Congress. Maybe it was John Oliver calling him a dingo . Whatever the reason, Wheeler is now telling Time Warner Cable CEO Rob Marcus personally that "your actions appear to have created the inability of consumers in the Los Angeles area to watch televised games of the Los Angeles Dodgers." In a business where finger-pointing is considered the sport of kings, that's a pretty harsh blow from an industry regulator—it's not often that an external agency directly apportions blame, but wrangling over costs or no, Wheeler is making an example of TWC in its dispute with the SportsNet LA, the network owned by Dodgers (disclosure: Guggenheim Partners, Adweek's parent company, acquired the Dodgers in 2012). Wheeler has demanded that Marcus supply the FCC all material pertaining to the SportsNetLA contract. Wheeler made it clear that he has a handle on the situation, too: "I understand that TWC's contract with SportsNet LA provides TWC with exclusive rights to the affiliate sales for SportsNet LA," Wheeler writes in a letter to Marcus.

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The Chairman of the FCC Is Annoyed With Time Warner Cable

July 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Maybe it was the widespread feeling that Tom Wheeler is too close to the industry he regulates . Maybe it was pressure from Congress. Maybe it was John Oliver calling him a dingo . Whatever the reason, Wheeler is now telling Time Warner Cable CEO Rob Marcus personally that "your actions appear to have created the inability of consumers in the Los Angeles area to watch televised games of the Los Angeles Dodgers." In a business where finger-pointing is considered the sport of kings, that's a pretty harsh blow from an industry regulator—it's not often that an external agency directly apportions blame, but wrangling over costs or no, Wheeler is making an example of TWC in its dispute with the SportsNet LA, the network owned by Dodgers (disclosure: Guggenheim Partners, Adweek's parent company, acquired the Dodgers in 2012). Wheeler has demanded that Marcus supply the FCC all material pertaining to the SportsNetLA contract. Wheeler made it clear that he has a handle on the situation, too: "I understand that TWC's contract with SportsNet LA provides TWC with exclusive rights to the affiliate sales for SportsNet LA," Wheeler writes in a letter to Marcus. "I further understand from press reports that, in its carriage negotiations with other [ multichannel video programming distributors ], TWC has demanded that SportsNet LA be carried on the basic service tier at rates of $4-$5 per subscriber. Other MVPDs in the network's footprint reportedly have refused to agree to these terms, claiming that the price is too high and objecting to terms that could require all subscribers to pay for access to the network." That stalemate has indeed shut 70 percent of the L.A

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Dunkin’s Shark Week Donut Is Not for Use as a Flotation Device

July 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Dunkin' Donuts has partnered with Discovery Channel's beloved Shark Week of aquatic predator-related programming to bring you the above confection, the Shark Bite donut, a yeast donut iced with a red-and-white pattern causing it to resemble a life preserver. The partnership extends to the Dunkin' logo on the Shark Week page, too—it's mostly the same, except it's had a bite taken out of it, and the slogan at the bottom reads, "Shark Week runs on Dunkin'" (rather than "America runs on Dunkin'"). The donut is going out to select stores around the country, says Harold Morgenstern, svp of national ad sales for Discovery. "Very rarely does Dunkin' Donuts change its logo," he pointed out. The deal is part of a larger Discovery partnership for the restaurant: "They'll be in all of our higher-rated premiere shows across the network," said Morgenstern. "For Shark Week, [Dunkin' is] new. They've been on and off the network for quite some time." Morgenstern says the partnership will also include a billboard in Times Square and ways for fans to interact. "We're going to have 'Take a Bite, Take a Pic,' encouraging fans to take a bite and take a picture of it [for social media]. During Shark After Dark, we'll show some of those and have some prizing involved." Accordingly, we felt like we should offer some suggestions for future donut/show integrations. Nude Donut (Naked & Afraid)

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Key & Peele Still Pumped About ‘Liam Neesons’ Ad

July 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Jokesters Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele —best known for their Comedy Central sketch comedy show Key & Peele —have created several hilarious, over-the-top characters, including super enthusiastic action movie fans The Valets. Adweek responsive video player used on /video. In February, the Valets turned their attention to airplane thriller Non-Stop, creating a clever native ad that has gone viral gold, generating more than 1.9 million views on YouTube. "We probably wouldn't be throwing the Valets at essentially a promotional opportunity, except for the fact they got 'Liam Neesons' to do it," Peele said during a Comic-Con event, referencing the duo's mispronunciation of the actor's name. "Also, Non-Stop ended up being a cool movie." "(Liam Neeson) came around the corner with his saucer and his tea cup, and I thought ‘This is going to be a great day!’” Key added. Taking full advantage that they got the Irish actor to star in the ad, Key and Peele reenact several key scenes from the movie's trailer in front of Neeson.

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Inside Homer Simpson’s Gigantic Head at Comic Con

July 27, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The inside of Homer Simpson’s head is filled with colorful drawings of the characters from the show named after his family, a giant video screen covering the top interior of his skull—which is about 20 feet in diameter—a brain (presumably to scale) about the size of an ottoman, and two dozen gaping Simpsons-loving fans staring up at the computer-generated mysterious voyage through Homer’s mind created by the marketing team in charge of the single biggest activation at San Diego Comic Con. Homer’s Dome is the name of the thing, according to FXX, which bankrolled and created it, but Mr. Simpson’s noggin takes up maybe a fourth of total Simpsons-occupied area, which resembles a small Coney Island-style amusement park, complete with midway games and a cotton candy machine (the fluff itself is blue, of course). It’s close to another big activation by a sister network, Fox’s zipline over a model skyline for its upcoming Batman spinoff. It’s a little like Springfield is a suburb of Gotham City.

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The Creators of Robot Chicken Love to Play With Toys

July 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When conjuring names for their new stop motion adult animated series, Stoopid Buddy Stoodios co-founders Matt Senreich, John "Harv" Harvatine, Seth Green and Eric Towner submitted 80 different titles to Cartoon Network . While an early submission—Free Paid Advertising For Popular Toy Companies—was probably one of the most appropriate, executives passed. "Robot Chicken was the terrible one that stuck," explained Senreich, laughing. "But that's what we're trying to do: We’re trying to show off how cool your toy is." Now wrapping up season seven and green-lit for season eight, Robot Chicken's success stems from the tender love and care it takes to find hilarious ways to put toys in everyday situations and absurdly dark scenarios. And in a twist, for the first time the creators will feature a character they created ( Bitch Pudding ) rather than an actual toy in a new episode that will air on Sunday. Though each season takes a grueling 14 months to make, for the guys working on the show, it's just an excuse to play with toys. And although the personas of the toys or characters are mocked, Senreich believes it's great marketing. "It's okay to make fun of yourself in this day and age. If anything it's publicity and pretty free publicity in a way because it makes your characters look cool to the older kids," he said. "That kind of validates (marketers) in pop culture," Towner added. "You have to have a certain popularity to click with the audience." That knack for playing with pop culture also explains why the production house has attracted name brands like DC Comics, Hasbro and—Senreich's holy grail— Lucasfilm. Robot Chicken produced three Star Wars specials after the company reached out to them, saying how much it loved its parody

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Oculus Rift Takes Center Stage at Comic-Con

July 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While you can read about how your favorite characters solved a crisis or watch a movie about a doomsday scenario, there's still something to be said about going through the heart-stopping action for yourself. Thanks to virtual reality technology Oculus Rift , some San Diego Comic-Con attendees were able to do just that. Oculus Rift made headlines when Facebook bought the parent company Oculus VR for $2 billion in March , to the dismay of several fans and developers . Not only does the technology submerse the user into the story through audio cues and vibrant visuals, its motion sensors allow for a 360-degree peek into the fictitious world. Despite usually being reserved for video games, several brands used the headset to give fans an experiential tour of their product. X-Men Days of Future Past turned Oculus Rift into Cerebro , the famed device Professor X uses (along with his telepathic powers) to locate mutants. Attendees sat in the Charles Xavier's wheelchair and used their mindpower to navigate the convention floor to find shape-shifting mutant Mystique. The participants ran into other iconic X-Men characters along the way, including Wolverine and Nightcrawler. Fox brought Oculus Rift to the Petco Interactive Zone right outside the main convention center, and allowed people to meet Ichabod Crane as a promotion for its series

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‘Better Call Saul’ Billboard in Albuquerque Really Turns Back the Clock

July 24, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Breaking Bad fans, this time you'd better call James! Those dying for a taste of AMC's Breaking Bad spinoff series, Better Call Saul, got a nice little present this week, as this billboard popped up in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The sign is actually a prop being used in the filming of the prequel series, set to debut next year. It seems Saul Goodman, in the days before he met meth king Walter White, went by the name of James M. McGill, attorney at law. The exclamatory "Better Call Saul!" billboards seen in episodes of Breaking Bad showed Goodman, played by Bob Odenkirk, pointing at the viewer, Uncle Sam-style, against a hot orange/yellow background. On the deep-blue McGill board, the actor rocks a bad toupee and gangster-style pinstripe suit

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Sex and the City Supercut Shows How Much It Loved Name-Dropping Brands

July 23, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Sex and the City's leading ladies—Carrie, Samantha, Miranda and Charlotte—turned everything from Manolo heels to sex swings into household names during the series' run on HBO. To show the women's love affair with consumer culture, artist Pierre Buttin

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