This Study From Nielsen and Google Says YouTube and Linear TV Help Each Other

August 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

YouTube and TV—two competing mediums fighting for the same eyeballs and advertising dollars—might actually be able to find common ground. A Nielsen case study commissioned by Google found that TV reach seems to drive YouTube engagement, and in turn, YouTube engagement drives TV reach. In other words, according to the report, people who view a TV program's content on YouTube are more likely to tune in to the actual show. Because of that, as TV audience increases, so does YouTube viewership. According to Nielsen, digital advertising in the U.S. has been rising 15 percent every year since 2012 with no signs of slowing down. (In fact, according to eMarketer , digital ad spending will surpass TV as soon as next year.) But the seemingly symbiotic relationship could be a sign for advertisers that both mediums might be better than just one. "The notion that YouTube can bring new people into a show while also keeping current fans connected presents a big opportunity for both programmers, as well as advertisers, who seek to capture audiences whenever and wherever they watch premium content," said Jonathan Zepp, Google's head of North American partnerships for YouTube. To conduct the study, Nielsen evaluated 30 TV shows—including genres such as comedy, competition, drama and talk shows—while analyzing historical data from YouTube and TV currency data from Nielsen's own sources. Researchers then looked to see how the two formats moved in relationship with each other apart from promotions, seasonality, brand effect and show engagement. Researchers also studied habits of those who watched TV content on YouTube and compared it to those who didn't. The results were "significant," according to the case study of Nielsen's findings.

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This Tourism Campaign’s ‘No Beachside Honeymooners’ Rule Boosted Belize’s GDP

August 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Tourism campaigns for Caribbean destinations often have a similar aesthetic—sandy beaches, honeymooning couples, frosty drinks by the pool. But the Belize Tourism Board and its agency, Olson, had enough of that. For its latest ad campaigns, the BTB focused on local experiences unique to Belize and making flying to the country easier. Three years ago, Olson started working with the BTB, launching "Discover How to Be ," a campaign that showcased the country's culture and experiences you can have there. Olson and the BTB also worked with Southwest Airlines and WestJet Airlines to open up more routes and direct flights to Belize from the U.S. and Canada. The strategy worked—the campaign was responsible for increasing travel to Belize and boosting the country's GDP by 2.24 percent, according to the Central Bank of Belize. "We set rules from the beginning—no honeymooners, no frozen drinks, nobody getting a massage by the pool," said Kevin McKeon, chief creative officer at Olson. "We want to go for someone who's a little more ambitious about what they're looking for in a vacation. The takeaway is you're going to meet some fascinating people and come back with a story you didn't expect to have." Its latest campaign, "A Curious Place," which launched this week, continues that theme.

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Ryan Lochte Inks Endorsement Deal With Pine Bros. Throat Drops

August 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Disgraced Olympian Ryan Lochte, who was dropped this week by major sponsors including Speedo and Ralph Lauren, has found a brand willing to take him on. Pine Bros. Softish Throat Drops signed an endorsement deal today with Lochte, who will appear in commercial and print ads for the brand. The swimmer thanked the company in a tweet today: Thanks to all the folks at pine bros. for your confidence in me. I look forward to making you proud

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Sesame Street Fans No Longer Need HBO to Watch Elmo and Cookie Monster on TV

August 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For the past year, the only way to get to Sesame Street—and watch new episodes featuring Elmo, Big Bird, Cookie Monster and the rest of the gang—was by subscribing to HBO, which has exclusive rights to the show through 2020. But starting in September, Sprout is offering fans a new way to see two of those characters without subscribing to the premium cable network. Elmo and Cookie Monster will appear in The Furchester Hotel, a new series on Sprout from Sesame Workshop and the BBC's preschool children's channel, CBeebies. The show takes place at a hotel operated by a family of monsters, including Funella Furchester, husband Furgus Fuzz and daughter Phoebe Furchester-Fuzz. Elmo, who is Phoebe's cousin, is on "an extended visit," according to a release, while Cookie Monster works at the hotel as a room-service and dining-room waiter. Both Elmo and Cookie Monster will be regular characters on the show. Beginning Sept. 26, 11-minute episodes of The Furchester Hotel will air weekdays at 9 a.m. and weekends at 11 a.m. (the weekend time slot will shift to 7 a.m.

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Ad of the Day: Millennial Smokers Get Left Out in Truth’s New FOMO-Filled Ads

August 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The tobacco-slagging Truth campaign is back to inspire, or maybe just torture, teenagers with more anti-smoking rhymes. A new ad, set to air during this Sunday's MTV Video Music Awards, focuses on a statistic largely overlooked among millennials—that people who habitually suck down cigarettes have significantly less cash than people who don't. And it does that, for better or worse, in song form. "I'm stuck with Pee-Pop, who smells like a foot, while my squad's at the movies, and they're seeing something good," raps the first young man in the minute-long video, as he laments not being able to afford to join his pals—he's broke because he smokes. It's part of a new ad push, unified under the hashtag #Squadless and created by Truth's agency, 72andSunny. With some two and a half minutes of airtime scheduled for the VMAs, the campaign is the organization's largest on the show since first partnering with it in 2014. Based on research that showed 88 percent of 15- to 25-year-olds didn't know that smokers have an average of 20 percent less income than non-smokers, the campaign will also include a :60 featuring a Diplo track, as well as digital and social components that will featuring singer Macy Kate and Vine star George Janko. And in perhaps the most brain-meltingly millennial media themed sentence ever, the release reads: "YouTube personality Timothy DeLaGhetto, Vine stars Lele Pons and Brent Rivera, will also support the #Squadless campaign by creating their own rap verses to start a rap battle on MTV's VMA Pre-Show Snapchat live story." One or two of those names might be vaguely familiar to the olds in the audience—at least, the olds familiar with Truth's advertising. Last year, DeLaGhetto had a hand in the campaign's Tinder-themed anti-smoking ad, a full-blown music video that left some, if not many, viewers reeling, and desperate for a cigarette. (Earlier this year, meanwhile, Truth was seen urging audiences to save the art of cat videos by not exposing felines to second-hand smoke—an effort that included an awkward "Peetition" requiring would-be signatories to share pictures or their pets urinating.) The new musical number is short, at least, and despite sporting one of the more obvious and stilted lyrical flows in the history of hip-hop (if it can be called that), manages one brilliant line, from the guy whose empty pockets leave him enough free time to become a Photoshop god. Confined to his room, he confesses: "I don't have the memories or experiences to share, but I can put my head on the body of a bear." That moment of charming idiocy is the ad's first saving grace (though it could reasonably be argued that the kid should be grateful for his newfound skill, which in the modern economy he might be able to parlay into a better-paying job). The second redeeming moment comes in slapstick form, when a young woman faceplants in the dirt from a significant height, though the point on which it's based is perhaps a bit convoluted: "If you smoke, you'll end up with a face full of bee stings, because you tried to climb a tree to see a concert your friends were going to but had no money to buy a ticket." In other words, the set pieces are willfully absurd—which itself wouldn't be a bad thing, if they didn't also come across as contortionist attempts to avoid preaching. The larger point, meanwhile—suggesting smoking cigarettes will lead to being alone—might seem counterintuitive, given that lighting up is often a social habit. More likely it's clever, though, given that the point is clearly meant to hit millennials where it counts—in their infamous FOMOs. But mostly, and unfortunately, what the ad seems to convey, is that do-gooder marketing executives think what kids really want these days is to cringe endlessly. That's a shame, given how important the message is. Or maybe it's an ingenious sleeper strategy, insofar as one of the best arguments for everyone everywhere quitting smoking forever is that nobody would ever have to cringe at one of these intentionally embarrassing spots again.

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Q&A: Malcolm Gladwell on Podcasting, Beer Ads and His Next Move

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Since history is written by the victor, it needs a top-notch editor. And that's exactly why best-selling author and New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell rolled out Revisionist History , a podcast in partnership with Slate's Panoply Media. The 10-episode series that debuted in June aims to shift the lens on events ranging from stolen art to a car manufacturer's fiasco to the American educational system in a bid to poke holes in the way we think about the past and present. With Gladwell at the helm, the podcast was an instant success, reaching the top spot on iTunes even before the first episode aired. As Gladwell prepares for the second season of Revisionist History, we caught up with him in his West Village home to talk about the power of audio, advertising and what's next. Adweek: Why is a podcast the best medium for the types of stories that you want to tell? Malcolm Gladwell: It's so different from writing books. You can tell a different kind of story, and when you can hear people's voices, you can recreate scenes and emotions and all those kinds of things so much more keenly and powerfully. And there's a wonderful directness to the podcasts—that I can do it and put it up online and I can reach all my listeners. There's an immediacy to it that's incredibly appealing. More young people are starting podcasts rather than blogs these days, and it's the fastest growing form of media. What's your take on this? I think you've seen three forms—the printed word, audio and video—you've seen existing conventional institutions being challenged by, essentially, young people working as part of small groups or on their own. The new technologies allow small players to compete in those three worlds. And it's been happening in film for a while now and video. Blogs were the beginnings of that happening in printed form.

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How Wine in a Can and ‘Brosé’ Are Helping Marketers Appeal to Millennials

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Move over, wine snobs. Millennials are disrupting wine marketing. The age group is outguzzling baby boomers in terms of wine consumption: 36 percent of wine drinkers in the U.S. are millennials versus 34 percent of baby boomers, according to the Wine Market Council. And to appeal to these millennials, wine brands are busy crafting innovative packaging, clever labels and more approachable messaging. Compared with older generations, millennials are more likely to drink wine at least once a week, noted Beth Bloom, senior food and drink analyst at Mintel.

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This Week’s Must-Haves: A Robotic Assistant That Gets to Know Your Family

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, the Adweek staff is highlighting a robotic family assistant, a hoverboard that won't spontaneously combust, Oakley's Olympian-worthy sunglasses and more. Take a look!

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Why This ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ Star Didn’t Watch the Original Show

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 46 Claim to fame Stars as Victor Strand on AMC's Fear the Walking Dead (Sundays, 9 p.m.); appears in the upcoming film The Birth of a Nation (Oct. 7); directs Barbecue at the Geffen Playhouse in L.A. (Sept. 6 to Oct. 16) Base Los Angeles Twitter @colmandomingo Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Colman Domingo: I hate to say it—I reach for my phone and go on Twitter. And CNN.com, especially because we're in the middle of this heated political season

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Viceland Suffers From Low Ratings Despite Its Young Audience

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Viceland launched in February, the network struck an agreement with Nielsen to keep its ratings private for six months. Shortly before that window is set to lapse, the first look at those Nielsen ratings are out, revealing that while the audience is a lot younger than that of the channel it replaced, H2, it's also a lot smaller. Viceland's average 18-49 prime-time audience in July was just 45,000, less than half of the 92,000 that H2 averaged in the demo last July, according to Nielsen ratings obtained by The Wall Street Journal . The deal that Viceland, a partnership between Vice and A+E Networks, struck with Nielsen is a common arrangement for many new networks as they try to get their bearings in the first months after launching. Nielsen will still not be publicly releasing Viceland's ratings for at least another week as part of that deal. While Viceland's audience is much smaller than H2's, it's also younger. The median viewer age dropped 17 years between July 2015 and July 2016, from 57 to 40. And Nielsen data found that the average 18-49 prime-time audience for the network's July premieres was up significantly, from 59,000 for H2 to 102,000 for Viceland. Depsite the premiere spin, those 18-49 ratings seem disappointing, especially given the buzz around Viceland. However, A+E Networks president and CEO Nancy Dubuc said she is taking a long-term view. "You have to look at what is the promise of H2 10 years from now, versus what is the promise of Viceland 10 years from now," Dubuc told the Journal. Viceland looked to shake up TV advertising by running more native ads that look like editorial and reducing ad load. The network's programming has just eight minutes of national ad time per hour and two minutes of local time. Shortly after the network launched, execs were already trying to downplay linear ratings expectations. Guy Slattery, general manager for Viceland, told Adweek in March that Viceland content is available on the website, app and VOD in addition to the linear networks, but Nielsen's numbers only reflect its linear ratings. "It's an important metric, but it only captures one piece of the multiplatform approach that we have," Slattery said. "So we didn't want to make it all about that. The headlines tend to go to Nielsen ratings, and we don't feel they're going to capture the viewing of this network, particularly among the demo that we're going after

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