Archive for February, 2013

Oscars put ABC on top for week

February 27, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

CBS poised to win sweep; Univision strong as well

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Global digital sales fueling music biz growth

February 27, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Expansion of services in developing nations drive 9% gain in revenue

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Clearwire to Tap Sprint Financing

February 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Clearwire Corp. plans to tap financing made available by Sprint Nextel Corp., people familiar with the situation said Tuesday, in a move that further complicates Dish Network Corp.’s effort to buy the wireless broadband operator. Dish has proposed buying Clearwire for $3.30 a share amid opposition among Clearwire shareholders to a deal in which Sprint would acquire the roughly half of Clearwire it doesn’t own for $2.97 a share. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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When an iPad Isn’t Enough

February 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Q: I gave my wife an iPad for Christmas and she is delighted with it. Unfortunately, I discovered that it would be useless for my purposes. I would need a tablet that acts like a desktop or laptop but is smaller and lighter. Specifically, I would need a tablet that would allow me to have three browsers open and visible on the screen simultaneously. Are there any tablets that would allow me to do this? A: I’d suggest you look at one of the new Windows 8 tablets that are powered by a laptop-class Intel processor and can run full, standard Windows. Perhaps the best known of these may be Microsoft’s Surface Pro, but there are others. You can see some of them at http://tinyurl.com/d2j5bay . A warning, though: These tablets are typically heavier, pricier and have less battery life than an iPad. Q: Is Windows 8 now reliable

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A Wristwatch Tells When Phone Calls, Emails Arrive

February 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

[ See post to watch video ] Do you ever find yourself frantically trying to fish your phone out of a pocket or purse to find out whether that beep or buzz from the device is an important call, text or email — or just something you can ignore? What if you could simply glance at your watch to find out? Well, now you can, thanks to a new $150 digital wristwatch called Pebble that connects to an iPhone or Android phone wirelessly and displays notifications and previews of calls, texts and emails. Not only that, but the Pebble can control music playback on a phone and show at a glance the song that’s playing, along with artist and album information. And of course, it tells time. It comes with multiple software watch faces and you can upload more. Even better, the Pebble, from a Silicon Valley startup of the same name, is a platform that can work with other apps and aspects of a smartphone. For instance, the company is planning to roll out options that display information from apps for runners and golfers by spring. And there are already techie workarounds that can enable the watch to link to other smartphone apps. The gadget has been much-discussed in tech circles and its founders raised millions of dollars via the crowdfunding service, Kickstarter. The Pebble wristwatch comes with multiple software watch faces in black and white and shows previews of emails and incoming call info. One important note: It isn’t a wrist communicator. It cannot conduct phone calls or compose texts and emails. It just notifies you about them, by gently vibrating and displaying sender or caller info, and for messages, an excerpt, on the screen. I’ve been testing the Pebble watch for about five days with an iPhone 5 and a Google Nexus 4. I found the watch light and comfortable and nobody stared at me like I was wearing a computer on my wrist. I was able to receive notifications and control music on both phones.

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Obama noms Ramer for another term on CPB

February 27, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Entertainment attorney was originally nominated to board by President Bush in '08

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Feinstein says additional CIA info not needed in ‘Zero’ case

February 27, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Senator denies inquiry was an investigation of film itself

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HBO, Eros add channels in India

February 27, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

HBO Defined, HBO Hits to air on Dish TV, Airtel

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From TED, the Future of Robots: 4D Printing, Personalization and Adaptation

February 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

What’s next for robots? They’re becoming smarter, more personalized, more adaptive. But at the same time they’re becoming more complex and capable, they’re also becoming more basic. One MIT scientist, for instance, is trying to program physical materials to assemble themselves. Ryan Lash/TED2013 4D printer Skylar Tibbits The TED Conference in Long Beach, Calif., today presented three very different approaches to robotics: A safe industrial robot called Baxter, a cheap personal robot called Romo, and a research initiative into programmable materials such as self-folding proteins. 4D Printing Let’s start with that last one. Skylar Tibbits, a lecturer in MIT’s architecture department and founder of its new Self-Assembly lab, describes what he’s doing as 4D printing . If the fourth dimension is time, Tibbits’s projects are designed to respond to energy and change over time. At TED, he showed off a collaboration with Stratasys and Autodesk to create strands made of multiple types of materials that when dipped in water fold themselves into pre-designed shapes. Here’s what it looks like : 4D Printing: MIT Self-Folding Strand from Skylar Tibbits on Vimeo . You can think of it as an extension of those tiny plastic capsules you bought as a kid at the dollar store that melt and expand in water and turn into tiny sponge creatures. (And if you never bought them, this analogy was totally ineffective.) Tibbits describes this as a fundamental shift to create things that are adaptable and have their own smarts. “It’s like robotics without wires or motors,” he said. James Duncan Davidson/TED2013 Keller Rinaudo and Romo Romo Romotive CEO Keller Rinaudo showed of the Romo, a product of not one but two successful campaigns on Kickstarter. The $150 device is an iPhone dock on wheels that uses Wi-Fi and computer vision to react to human movement and other input

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Nickelodeon Keeps the Greenlights Coming and Caters to Tech Advertisers

February 26, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For the first time in a while, Nickelodeon can say that its ratings are recovering—the kids' network is back up 5 percent year-over-year in its key demo

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