Archive for January, 2013

American Express CMO John Hayes on 'Unstaged,' Social Media, and Their Vast Amount of Data on Concertgoers

American Express CMO John Hayes on ‘Unstaged,’ Social Media, and Their Vast Amount of Data on Concertgoers

January 30, 2013  |  Blog  |  No Comments

John Hayes, chief marketing officer of American Express, has access to more data on the average concertgoer than perhaps any other company. Not only does Hayes know that 40% of AmEx's 102 million cardmembers spend money on music every year, and that AmEx concert pre-sales and exclusive events help sell 4 million tickets a year - he also knows how those music fans spend their time and money around a show. Speaking with Billboard editorial director Bill Werde in an onstage Q&A at MIDEM's Visionary Monday, Hayes said, "We don't just know the absolute numbers [of concertgoers]...we know whether you went

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Report Gauges Companies’ Approach to Advertising on Social Media

Report Gauges Companies’ Approach to Advertising on Social Media

January 30, 2013  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Since the arrival of social media platforms, companies have tried to figure out how to best use them to get their messages to consumers, often with mixed results. Some brands have embraced the notion that social platforms like Twitter allow constant interaction, for better or worse, with their customers. Others have turned away from some strains of social media, as General Motors did last spring when it stopped advertising on Facebook while raising questions about the return on its investment. The move had a ripple effect in the advertising world, with many brands questioning whether the costs of being on social

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Altitude unveils sales as it builds EFM slate

January 30, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

'Stone Roses' doc, 'Catch' among seven pics it's repping

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WB toying with Superman merchandise

January 30, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

WB, DC get creative with 'Man of Steel' products

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Ray Charles Foundation to appeal decision on song copyrights

January 30, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Org contesting children's claims to material in wake of trust agreements

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Judge Says Samsung’s Infringement of Apple Patents Not Willful, But Denies Bid For New Trial

January 30, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

The judge overseeing the Apple-Samsung case in San Jose denied Apple’s contention that Samsung’s infringement of its patents was willful, but at the same time she also rejected Samsung’s bid for a new trial. Judge Lucy Koh said that jury’s $1 billion verdict was supported by the evidence, adding that “the trial was fairly conducted, with uniform time limits and rules of evidence applied to both sides.” “A new trial,” Koh wrote in the ruling, “would be contrary to the interests of justice.” Both sides are likely to appeal various parts of the verdict with some appeals in the case already filed. For those that want to read the whole ruling, The Verge has posted a PDF .

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Codeblack bows ‘Angela’

January 30, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Shingle nabs theatrical rights to Shola Lynch's docu

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Hispanics power box office, with 25% of U.S. admissions

January 30, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Overall attendance declined slightly in 2012, according to NATO

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In the Battle of More Data Vs. Better Algorithms, Better Data Beats Them Both

January 30, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Image copyright kentoh In a series of articles last year, executives from the ad-data firms BlueKai , eXelate and Rocket Fuel debated whether the future of online advertising lies with “More Data” or “Better Algorithms.” Omar Tawakol of BlueKai argues that more data wins because you can drive more effective marketing by layering additional data onto an audience. While we agree with this, we can’t help feeling like we’re presented with a false choice. Maybe we should think about a solution that involves smaller amounts of higher quality data instead of more data or better algorithms. First, it’s important to understand what data is feeding the marketing ecosystem and how it’s getting there. Most third-party profiles consist of data points inferred from the content you consume, forms you fill out and stuff you engage with online. Some companies match data from offline databases with your online identity, and others link your activity across devices. Lots of energy is spent putting trackers on every single touchpoint. And yet the result isn’t very accurate — we like to make jokes around the office about whether one of our colleagues’ profiles says they’re a man or a woman that day. Truth be told, on most days BlueKai thinks they are both. One way to increase the quality of data would be to change where we get it from. Instead of scraping as many touch-points as possible, we could go straight to the source — the individual. Imagine the power of data from across an individual’s entire digital experience — from search to social to purchase, across devices. This kind of data will make all aspects of online advertising more efficient: True attribution, retargeting-type performance for audience targeting, purchase data, customized experiences. So maybe the solution to “More Data” vs. “Better Algorithms” isn’t incremental improvements to either, but rather to invite consumers to the conversation and capture a fundamentally better data set. Getting this new type of data to the market won’t be easy. Four main hurdles need to be cleared for the market to reach scale: Control and Comfort. When consumers say they want “privacy,” they don’t normally desire the insular nature of total anonymity. Rather, they want control over what is shared and with whom.

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Amazon’s E-Book Business Is Up 70 Percent, but It’s Still Not Disclosing Kindle Sales

January 30, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Amazon is still not saying how many Kindles it is selling, even though the e-book business has become a “multi-billion dollar category” for the retailer. But whatever those sales numbers were, they would have been higher last year if Amazon hadn’t sold out of its flagship e-reader, said Amazon’s CFO Tom Szkutak during the company’s earnings call today. In response to an analyst’s question about why the company’s revenue was lighter than expected in Q4 , Szkutak named a number of reasons. For one, he said, sales of consumer electronics, including TVs, MP3s and digital cameras, fell short of expectations. But also, he said, it had to do with shortages of the Kindle Paperwhite. “We are thrilled to have Paperwhite in our lineup — it’s the best e-reader out there, but we couldn’t keep up with demand,” he said. “We would have had more sales in Q4 if we could keep up with demand.” “The team is working hard to have good stock going forward on that product,” he added. Amazon is notorious for not commenting on the performance of its hardware business, and that policy didn’t change this quarter. But in Amazon’s earnings release, Amazon’s CEO Jeff Bezos did open up a little bit about the company’s e-book business as a whole. “We’re now seeing the transition we’ve been expecting,” he said. “After five years, eBooks is a multi-billion dollar category for us and growing fast — up approximately 70 percent last year. In contrast, our physical book sales experienced the lowest December growth rate in our 17 years as a book seller, up just 5 percent. We’re excited and very grateful to our customers for their response to Kindle and our ever expanding ecosystem and selection.” Some critics will not consider that enough information, given the size of the business. After all, without knowing unit sales, it makes it extremely difficult for analysts to compare Amazon to other tablet makers, namely Apple. But in some respects, e-book sales is a better measurement to track Amazon’s performance.

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