/// Attention Start-Ups: Just Because Facebook Clones Your App, It Doesn’t Mean You’re Dead

December 26, 2012  |  All Things Digital


It must be frightening to be a successful Web start-up, knowing that at any moment another giant tech company could come along and clone your idea. It happens all the time. Indeed, when I wrote that Facebook was to introduce its own version of a Snapchat app last week — a mobile messaging application that allows users to send self-destructing text, photo and video messages to one another — many began writing their Snapchat eulogies. Not so fast. While Facebook’s new Poke app shot up to No. 1 in the App Store for its first few days on the market, it has settled back down to spot No. 39, according to the latest numbers on Apple’s App Store leader board. Part of this has a simple explanation. For the first few days after Facebook released Poke, the company inserted links to the App Store into users’ news feeds, prompting them to download the new app. That sort of distribution power is rivaled by few, as the news feed is literally front and center for every single one of Facebook’s billion-plus users. That, combined with the release day press blitz, pushed the app to the top of the charts. But now Facebook seems to have taken that placement out of the feed. That’ll obviously sink the download rates for the new app. And it has only been out for a few days, so it’s not necessarily a measure of the app’s long-term growth

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Attention Start-Ups: Just Because Facebook Clones Your App, It Doesn’t Mean You’re Dead



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