Archive for October, 2012

Apple Delays iTunes Refresh

October 30, 2012  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Apple surprised lots of people yesterday. Here’s a smaller bit of unexpected news: The company is delaying its update of its iTunes software. Back in September, Apple said an iTunes overhaul would be out in October . Now it’s pushing that back a month. Here’s spokesman Tom Neumayr’s take: “The new iTunes is taking longer than expected and we wanted to take a little extra time to get it right. We look forward to releasing this new version of iTunes with its dramatically simpler and cleaner interface, and seamless integration with iCloud before the end of November.” The obvious question is whether the delay is related to the company’s  management changes, including the ouster of top executive Scott Forstall . Neumayr declined to answer that one. But it’s worth pointing out that Forstall wasn’t in charge of iTunes — that one falls under media boss Eddy Cue. On the other hand, Apple’s last major software refresh led to a public apology from Tim Cook . So it’s reasonable to guess that Apple would take extra care to get this one into shape. Here’s what the new software is supposed to include: Better layout Improved performance Easier playlist creation Full-library search  improved iCloud integration.  A completely redesigned mini-player A full-window interface on your Mac or PC, a new library view and an expandable album view. No word on whether the software will require less storage and computing power on Apple’s devices, which has been a longtime user complaint.

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Lucille Martin, assistant to Disney, Eisner dies

October 30, 2012  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Film News: Served as VP, special assisant to Disney board of directors

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Sony boss: ‘No truth’ to studio sale talk

October 30, 2012  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Film News: CEO Kazuo Hirai denies rumors that H'wood assets are on block

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NY Media Fumbles, Fights Its Way Through Sandy

October 30, 2012  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It was the biggest storm in New York in nearly 80 years, and while most of the city's media were prepared to meet the challenge, some were not. For example, the flooding on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange did not, in fact, take place. CNN meteorologist Chad Meyers reported the alleged flood on Piers Morgan Tonight , citing the National Weather Service , which denied making the claim. After following the trail to an NWS message board, then to Twitter, it became apparent that a user calling himself @ComfortablySmug (who is followed by dozens if not hundreds of reporters) had been disseminating bad information all night—that ConEd was shutting down all power in New York City, that Gov. Andrew Cuomo was trapped in Manhattan, that the MTA had announced service closures for the rest of the week, and other falsehoods, many of which were retweeted or re-reported. By Tuesday, BuzzFeed had outed @ComfortablySmug ; he is

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Video Gallery: Live From Hurricane Sandy

October 30, 2012  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

TV news reporters—especially those of the meteorological persuasion—are the first to admit they live to cover severe weather. Flying into action nearly as fast as police, fire and emergency services workers, local TV news reporters are among the first on the scene of any natural disaster. But unlike their well-trained fellow front-liners, they don't always know what they're doing once they get there.

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Video Gallery: Live From Hurricane Sandy

October 30, 2012  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

TV news reporters—especially those of the meteorological persuasion—are the first to admit they live to cover severe weather. Flying into action nearly as fast as police, fire and emergency services workers, local TV news reporters are among the first on the scene of any natural disaster. But unlike their well-trained fellow front-liners, they don't always know what they're doing once they get there.

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VIDEO GALLERY: Live From the Eye of Hurricane Sandy

October 30, 2012  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

TV news reporters—especially those of the meteorological persuasion—are the first to admit they live to cover severe weather. Flying into action nearly as fast as police, fire and emergency services workers, local TV news reporters are among the first on the scene of any natural disaster. But unlike their well-trained fellow front-liners, they don't always know what they're doing once they get there.

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Nokia Dangles Mobile Ad Exchange and Other Carrots to Lure More Developers

October 30, 2012  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Nokia is announcing on Tuesday that it is setting up its own mobile ad exchange in an effort to allow developers to potentially make more money from Windows Phone apps. andersphoto / Shutterstock.com The Finnish phone giant is working with Israel’s Inneractive to create Nokia Ad Exchange (NAX), which officials say will enable access to 120 different ad networks across the globe, with the opportunity to gain revenue in more than 200 countries. “It really is a single point for developers to monetize any app that they have or (to) promote other apps,” Nokia developer relations executive Richard Kerris said in an interview. The other pitch Nokia is making is offering a greater-than-typical cut to developers, promising 75 percent to the app maker, with Nokia and Inneractive getting the remaining 25 percent. In addition, Nokia is also offering developers a bunch of added benefits to those who take part in a new premier program. For $99, developers get membership in Microsoft’s Windows developer program, technical support and as much as $1,200 worth of real-time notifications, enough for 12 million API calls.

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Paul Giamatti, Billy Bob Thornton lead ‘Parkland’

October 30, 2012  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Film News: Jacki Weaver also cast in Tom Hanks' JFK assassination drama

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Skewering Madison Avenue for 60 Years

Skewering Madison Avenue for 60 Years

October 30, 2012  |  Blog  |  No Comments

For six decades, a magazine has been putting the “Mad” in Madison Avenue by lampooning — and frequently harpooning — the huckstering of the advertising industry. The magazine is, of course, Mad, which is celebrating its history of “humor in a jugular vein,” as its slogan once promised, with an anthology to be published on Tuesday titled “Totally Mad: 60 Years of Humor, Satire, Stupidity and Stupidity.” Among the 256 pages of the $34.95 book are generous samples of the wicked ad spoofs, parodies and sendups — takeoffs, as the editors call them — that have been an intrinsic part of

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