/// Former Apple CEO Says Newton "Scribble Thing" Was 15 Years Ahead of Its Time

January 13, 2012  |  All Things Digital


When Apple co-founder Steve Jobs returned to Apple in 1997, he famously killed off a number of products for the good of the company. Top among them was the Newton, for which Jobs had a profound distaste. Asked what he thought of the device during a Q&A at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference that year, Jobs slagged it as worthless, in a remark oddly prefigurative of the iPhone (see video below). “I tried a Newton,” he said. “I bought one of the early ones; I thought it was a piece of junk, I threw it away. I bought one of the Motorola Envoys; I thought it was a piece of junk after three months and threw it away. … Here’s my problem [with these devices]: My problem is, to me, the high-order bit is connectivity. The high-order bit is being in touch, connected to a network. … What I want is this little thing that I carry around with me that’s got a keyboard on it — because to do email you need a keyboard. … And it needs to be connected to the Net. So if somebody would just make a little thing where you’re connected to the Net at all times, and you’ve got a little keyboard. God, I’d love to buy one.

More:
Former Apple CEO Says Newton "Scribble Thing" Was 15 Years Ahead of Its Time


newEngagebanner

Leave a Reply