Archive for August, 2011

TouchPad, This Was Your Life.

August 23, 2011  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Read More

Mangrove

August 22, 2011  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Film Reviews: A French femme travels back to the coastal Mexican village where she used to live in order to make peace with the past in the humidly atmospheric but underwhelming Franco-Swiss co-production "Mangrove."

Read More

Finding New Investors, in 140 Characters or Less

August 22, 2011  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Having trouble landing investors? Try showing some attitude on Twitter. This approach has worked wonders for Naked Pizza, an all-natural restaurant chain that began using the social-media service five years ago. Owners Robbie Vitrano and Jeff Leach post humorous (and pointed) notes every day, on subjects ranging from nutrition to the state of the food business to out-and-out jokes like, “One more glass of wine and I will b buying pop tarts from that damn vending machine for dinner, again.” The New Orleans company says it has gotten about 8,000 investment inquiries in the past year and a half thanks to its online presence. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

Read More

NFL Network Locks Up Mediacom Carriage

August 22, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With less than three weeks to go before the 2011-12 season kicks off, Mediacom has scored a multiyear affiliate deal with NFL Network. While financial terms were not disclosed, the pact includes carriage of the 24/7 NFL Network, as well as the game day highlights service, NFL RedZone. Mediacom plans to flip the switch on the NFL Network in its Midwestern and Southern markets before the season begins on Sept. 8. Wherever possible, the cable operator will launch simultaneous standard definition and HD feeds for both channels. NFL Net and RedZone will be available to Mediacom customers who subscribe to its Digital Plus package. Fans looking to enhance the coverage afforded by the stand-alone net can add a season of RedZone for $49.95. Mediacom is the country’s eighth-largest cable operator, serving 1.18 million subs in third- and fourth-tier media markets such as Springfield, Mo., and Albany, Ga. When satellite TV providers (DirecTV, DISH Network) and telcos (Verizon, AT&T) are factored in, Mediacom is ranked 12th among all U.S. distributors. The deal comes on the heels of a similar pact between NFL Net and top-five cable operator Charter Communications. Earlier this month, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said the channel was in ongoing carriage talks with Time Warner Cable . “You’ll be happy to know we are in negotiations today with Time Warner

Read More

MSNBC Late to the Qaddafi Party

August 22, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As rebel forces breached the walls of Tripoli yesterday, and Muammar el-Qaddafi’s brutal reign seemed poised for a spectacular collapse after months of civil war, American cable news outlets were all over the story. Except for MSNBC, that is. CNN started reporting live from Libya at 2 p.m., and began dedicating continuous coverage at 6. Fox News first began reporting on Libya during its Fox and Friends morning show at 6 a.m., with continuous live coverage starting at 4 p.m. But for hours, as Tripoli began to fall and as outlets around the world covered the struggle, MSNBC remained mute, choosing not to interrupt its traditional weekend fare of crime documentaries and prison lockup shows until much later in the evening.

Read More

MSNBC Late to the Qaddafi Party

August 22, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As rebel forces breached the walls of Tripoli yesterday, and Muammar el-Qaddafi’s brutal reign seemed poised for a spectacular collapse after months of civil war, American cable news outlets were all over the story. Except for MSNBC, that is. CNN started reporting live from Libya at 2 p.m., and began dedicating continuous coverage at 6. Fox News first began reporting on Libya during its Fox and Friends morning show at 6 a.m., with continuous live coverage starting at 4 p.m. But for hours, as Tripoli began to fall and as outlets around the world covered the struggle, MSNBC remained mute, choosing not to interrupt its traditional weekend fare of crime documentaries and prison lockup shows until much later in the evening. The programming discrepancy among the top news networks did not go unnoticed. How could it? At one point, MSNBC was airing home footage of a bear walking on an electric cable while its competition discussed Qaddafi’s future, as pundits took to excoriating it over Twitter. “MSNBC is airing a feature on ‘the 1992 slaying of Roger de la Burde’ rather than covering the fall of #Qaddafi in Tripoli,” The Daily’s Hunter Walker tweeted at around 5 o’clock. “CNN and Fox News are in live coverage of Libya uprising. MSNBC: staying with scheduled programming of Caught on Camera in NYC,” tweeted Broadcasting & Cable reporter Andrea Morabito. Was literally all of MSNBC away for the weekend? How could the second highest-rated cable news network in America remain silent on the impending overthrow of a 40-year Middle East dictator? Reporters reached out to MSNBC in the early evening for an explanation, and the network issued a statement. MSNBC was “monitoring the news closely,” and would be breaking into its regularly scheduled programming at 8 p.m., a spokesperson said. So what happened? According to sources at MSNBC who agreed to speak to Adweek on condition of anonymity, yesterday’s programming choices were a product of the network’s priorities. “Part of the success of MSNBC is the huge ratings it gets on weekends with these long-form [documentary] shows,” they said. “There are certain times, maybe three or four times a year, when that hurts you because something big breaks. If it happens on the weekends, this place is at a disadvantage

Read More

MSNBC Late to the Qaddafi Party

August 22, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As rebel forces breached the walls of Tripoli yesterday, and Muammar el-Qaddafi’s brutal reign seemed poised for a spectacular collapse after months of civil war, American cable news outlets were all over the story. Except for MSNBC, that is. CNN started reporting live from Libya at 2 p.m., and began dedicating continuous coverage at 6. Fox News first began reporting on Libya during its Fox and Friends morning show at 6 a.m., with continuous live coverage starting at 4 p.m. But for hours, as Tripoli began to fall and as outlets around the world covered the struggle, MSNBC remained mute, choosing not to interrupt its traditional weekend fare of crime documentaries and prison lockup shows until much later in the evening. The programming discrepancy among the top news networks did not go unnoticed. How could it?

Read More

MSNBC Late to the Qaddafi Party

August 22, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As rebel forces breached the walls of Tripoli yesterday, and Muammar el-Qaddafi’s brutal reign seemed poised for a spectacular collapse after months of civil war, American cable news outlets were all over the story. Except for MSNBC, that is. CNN started reporting live from Libya at 2 p.m., and began dedicating continuous coverage at 6. Fox News first began reporting on Libya during its Fox and Friends morning show at 6 a.m., with continuous live coverage starting at 4 p.m. But for hours, as Tripoli began to fall and as outlets around the world covered the struggle, MSNBC remained mute, choosing not to interrupt its traditional weekend fare of crime documentaries and prison lockup shows until much later in the evening. The programming discrepancy among the top news networks did not go unnoticed. How could it? At one point, MSNBC was airing home footage of a bear walking on an electric cable while its competition discussed Qaddafi’s future, as pundits took to excoriating it over Twitter. “MSNBC is airing a feature on ‘the 1992 slaying of Roger de la Burde’ rather than covering the fall of #Qaddafi in Tripoli,” The Daily’s Hunter Walker tweeted at around 5 o’clock. “CNN and Fox News are in live coverage of Libya uprising. MSNBC: staying with scheduled programming of Caught on Camera in NYC,” tweeted Broadcasting & Cable reporter Andrea Morabito. Was literally all of MSNBC away for the weekend? How could the second highest-rated cable news network in America remain silent on the impending overthrow of a 40-year Middle East dictator? Reporters reached out to MSNBC in the early evening for an explanation, and the network issued a statement

Read More

MSNBC Late to the Qaddafi Party

August 22, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As rebel forces breached the walls of Tripoli yesterday, and Muammar el-Qaddafi’s brutal reign seemed poised for a spectacular collapse after months of civil war, American cable news outlets were all over the story. Except for MSNBC, that is. CNN started reporting live from Libya at 2 p.m., and began dedicating continuous coverage at 6. Fox News first began reporting on Libya during its Fox and Friends morning show at 6 a.m., with continuous live coverage starting at 4 p.m. But for hours, as Tripoli began to fall and as outlets around the world covered the struggle, MSNBC remained mute, choosing not to interrupt its traditional weekend fare of crime documentaries and prison lockup shows until much later in the evening. The programming discrepancy among the top news networks did not go unnoticed. How could it? At one point, MSNBC was airing home footage of a bear walking on an electric cable while its competition discussed Qaddafi’s future, as pundits took to excoriating it over Twitter. “MSNBC is airing a feature on ‘the 1992 slaying of Roger de la Burde’ rather than covering the fall of #Qaddafi in Tripoli,” The Daily’s Hunter Walker tweeted at around 5 o’clock. “CNN and Fox News are in live coverage of Libya uprising. MSNBC: staying with scheduled programming of Caught on Camera in NYC,” tweeted Broadcasting & Cable reporter Andrea Morabito. Was literally all of MSNBC away for the weekend? How could the second highest-rated cable news network in America remain silent on the impending overthrow of a 40-year Middle East dictator? Reporters reached out to MSNBC in the early evening for an explanation, and the network issued a statement. MSNBC was “monitoring the news closely,” and would be breaking into its regularly scheduled programming at 8 p.m., a spokesperson said. So what happened? According to sources at MSNBC who agreed to speak to Adweek on condition of anonymity, yesterday’s programming choices were a product of the network’s priorities. “Part of the success of MSNBC is the huge ratings it gets on weekends with these long-form [documentary] shows,” they said. “There are certain times, maybe three or four times a year, when that hurts you because something big breaks.

Read More

Island Def Jam ups Karen Kwak

August 22, 2011  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Music News: Label veteran will serve as executive vp/head of A&R -- Island Def Jam Music Group has promoted Karen Kwak to executive vp/head of A&R, the Universal Music Group unit announced Monday.

Read More