Archive for June 16th, 2011

Oprah Winfrey Wants O.J. Simpson to Confess On Her Network

June 16, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Oprah Winfrey had a message for the industry operatives gathered in her home city of Chicago at the final day of the Cable Show this morning. "I wouldn't bet against me." It was a pointed acknowledgement of the dismal performance by her Discovery-owned cable network OWN, which has been plagued by changes in leadership and poor ratings since its launch in January of this year. Winfrey acknowledged the network's struggles, and took the opportunity to underline a point that she and the press have been making about her network for months—namely, that

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Oprah Winfrey Wants O.J. Simpson to Confess On Her Network

June 16, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Oprah Winfrey had a message for the industry operatives gathered in her home city of Chicago at the final day of the Cable Show this morning. "I wouldn't bet against me." It was a pointed acknowledgement of the dismal performance by her Discovery-owned cable network OWN, which has been plagued by changes in leadership and poor ratings since its launch in January of this year. Winfrey acknowledged the network's struggles, and took the opportunity to underline a point that she and the press have been making about her network for months—namely, that

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More Red Flags for the Daily Deals Market, Survey Finds

June 16, 2011  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Groupon is already getting a bruising about the prospects for its business , and now a new study reveals a few troubling points about the daily deals market, as well. The study conducted by Rice University found that while more than half of the merchants believe they made money from deals, merchants report that a relatively low numbers of buyers spend beyond the deal value. The report, conducted by Utpal Dholakia, surveyed 324 businesses that conducted deals between August 2009 and March 2011 in 23 U.S. markets from five major providers — Groupon, LivingSocial, OpenTable, Travelzoo and BuyWithMe. The business reported that 55.5 percent of the time they made money, 26.6 percent lost money and17.9 percent broke even. Moreover, the study concluded that over the next few years, it is likely that daily deal sites will have to settle for lower revenue shares because it will be harder and more expensive for them to find viable candidates to fill their pipeline. The four major red flags: A low percentages of deal users spend beyond the deal value (35.9 percent) and returning for a full-price purchase (19.9 percent). Less than half of the businesses indicated enthusiasm about running another daily deal in the future. About 70 percent indicated openness to considering a different daily deal site. And only 35.9 percent of restaurants and bars and 41.5 percent of salons and spas said they would run another promotion in the future.

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The Programming Insider: Thursday 6/16/11

June 16, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In Today's Issue Prime-Time Metered Market Wednesday Ratings: Hockey Lifts NBC to Victory Ratings Box: What’s Hot/What’s Not On the Air Tonight: Prime-Time Programming Options TV Tidbits: Notes of Interest TV Trivia Time: Life Outside of Dallas PRIME-TIME METERED MARKET WEDNESDAY RATINGS: Hockey Lifts NBC to Victory Wednesday 6/15/11 Household Rating/Share NBC: 5.9/10, Fox: 5.4/ 9, CBS: 4.1/ 7, ABC: 3.3/ 6, CW: 0.8/ 1 Note: The overnight comparisons to one year earlier are not available today.

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MipJunior shakes up program

June 16, 2011  |  Variety  |  No Comments

TV News: Confab bows TV Projects in Development section -- MipJunior, a leading international showcase of youth programs, is shaking things up.

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Hal David: Story of his life

June 16, 2011  |  Variety  |  No Comments

ASCAP: Songwriter recieves honor from Songwriters Hall of Fame -- Master lyricist Hal David receives the Songwriters Hall of Fame's inaugural Visionary Leadership Award.

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Media Buyers Warn of TV Ad Downturn

June 16, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Despite being well on the way to wrapping one of the most lucrative upfront periods in TV history, media buyers are seeing signs that the ad boom may not be long for this world. Speaking on a panel at the NCTA Cable Show in Chicago on Wednesday, Horizon Media president and CEO Bill Koenigsberg said that for all the dollars flowing into the upfront marketplace, the annual trading session does not necessarily serve as a reliable indicator for how the remainder of the year will shake out. “I don’t think the barometer of this upfront is a forecast for the future,” Koenigsberg said, adding that “the jury still out” as to whether the general economy will cause advertisers to pull back in the latter half of the year. Koenigsberg has been a vocal critic of the upfront, in which broadcasters sell between 75 percent and 80 percent of their available prime time inventory. (Cable networks move roughly 50 percent.) In February, the Horizon founder said the upfront was no longer the most efficient way to serve the needs of the client, as it forces marketers to make a premature commitment to vast amounts of ad space. He also has characterized the upfront as TV’s “silly season,” decrying the sort of posturing that goes on when one side of the buyer-seller continuum holds greater sway than the other. For all his misgivings about the upfront process, Koenigsberg isn’t necessarily a malcontent. He just sees a certain irrational exuberance inherent in the gung-ho ad market, a giddiness that seems at odds with the nation’s high unemployment rate (9.1 percent in May 2011) and sagging housing market. Clients “aren’t throwing any parades” for the recovery, Koenigsberg said. Other agency chiefs were cautiously optimistic about the enduring solidity of the ad market. Tim Spengler , president of Initiative North America, said he holds out hope that the greater consumer economy will eventually pull alongside the increasingly robust advertising economy

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Hiring your next rock stars

ColinGlaum
June 16, 2011  |  Blog  |  No Comments

By Colin Glaum Hiring your next rock stars. I finished reading “A Whole New Mind” by Dan Pink and I have to say it was one of the more enlightening reads I’ve had in a while. In it, Mr. Pink offers three reasons why the future workforce will be driven by creative thinkers. 1. The continued rise of developing culture and massive populations of India and China. 2. The simplification of many “L-Directional” driven jobs (He defines tasks by whether they use left-brain thinking or right brain thinking. For example occupations that require sequential thinking like being a doctor or a lawyer are examples

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Netflix Becomes Cable Show’s Obsession

June 16, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After two days it's clear that the great obsession of this Cable show is Netflix. It is the bogeyman of Chicago, the company that keeps coming up again and again and again over coffee, in meetings, and during panel discussions on nearly every industry-related topic. Yesterday, it started first thing in the morning when Michael Willner, CEO of cable provider Insight Communications, took a swipe at the Netflix business model. “Cheapness and what we’re providing don’t necessarily go hand in hand,” he said. “Netflix is probably the best example of an application that requires a ‘fat’ [broadband] pipe ... If they want to compete, Netflix will have to charge prices that are comparable to our services.” It was the second day in a row that a cable chief took the opportunity to denigrate Netflix in public—yesterday, Viacom chief Philippe Dauman dismissed the service as little more than a provider of “library programming.” There has been ample talk here in Chicago of the various ways in which the cable industry can adapt to the changing video landscape. TV Everywhere is imminent, most say, and new set-top-box technologies will be able to much more seamlessly blend online video and traditional linear television. But there has been almost as much discussion of the competition in the last two days—and of Netflix in particular, as if it were the one company threatening to bring down an entire industry

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Axelrod, Gillespie Talk Political Ads In Age of Twitter

June 16, 2011  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The speed of technological development these days makes the pace of the presidential election cycle seem absolutely glacial. Last time around, Barack Obama was hailed for his grasp of new media—which included a massive text messaging campaign as a core component of his get-out-the-vote operation. In the age of Twitter, that sort of thing seems ancient. These days, the talk has turned not only to Tweets but to Facebook and ad interactivity. At a roundtable discussion between former Obama senior advisor David Axelrod and former George W. Bush advisor Ed Gillespie (moderated by CNN political correspondent Candy Crowley ) during the Cable Show in Chicago yesterday, the two strategists pondered the political ad in a rapidly transforming media market. “New technologies are going to be helpful,” Axelrod said. “If we have the ability not just to send ads, but to have interactive experiences with them [that’s desirable]. And that’s a feature the Internet offers

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